OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 26, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-08-26/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WALL STREET IS
STILLALARMED
Not Assnred by Reports on
Harriman's Condition.
STOCK MARKET IS WEAK
Union Paclfle and Allied Securities
Particularly Depressed, Heavy De
cline* Being Recorded on Big Vol
ume of Trades—Harrlman's An
nouncement That Dividends Would
Not Be Increased a Factor.
New York, Aug. 26.—The stock mar
ket opened weak on unfavorable in
ter pretations of the reports of Mr.
Hnrriman's health and disappointment
over his interview, in which he indi
cated it to be his policy to maintain
Present dividends and extend the
properties rather than to Increase im
mediately the returns to stockholders.
The Harriman railroads, New York
Central, Erie and Reading were con
spicuously weak, with declines of a
point or more.
Before the end of the first hour fur
ther weakness was shown by the Har
riman stocks and Union Pacific showed
J| decline of 3%, the preferred 2%
tjnd Southern Pacific 2. Reading was
iold extensively at a decline of over
2 points. In the group of specialists
the most marked recession was in
©moral Electric, which sold off 2Va-
Respite the fact that the business of
the first hour was limited largely to a
Half dozen issues the volume of trad
IbR was in excess of 300,000 shares.
Ifl the second hour there was some
recovery, but on a reduction of opera
tions.
By noon further losses were record
ed throughout the lisV Union Pacific
was ofT over 5 points, the preferred
over 2, Southern Pacific 3, New York
Central 3^, Reading 3 V*. St. Paul 2%
and United States Steel common and
Erie common 2 points each.
HOPES TO REGAIN STRENGTH
Harriman Begins "After Cure" at His
Summer Home.
New York, Aug. 26.—Sustained by
•beer determination and will power
S. H. Harriman, after a trying ordeal
accompanying his arrival from Eu
fDpe, is beginning the after cure for
Which he returned to his home in Ar
$en after a rigorous treatment at Bad
flastein. His weakness resulting from
fe|ie ill health and rigid diet while
Sibroad was accentuated on his arrival
|jy an attack of nausea while coming
Hp the harbor and It apparently re
ired considerable exercise of nerve
rce on Mr. Harrlman's part to carry
felm through the transfer from the
liner to the tug which bore him to his
new home and to face and answer the
COURTYARD AT ARDEN.
Questions of many newspaper men
yho met him at the dock. While Mr.
fttarriman seemed physically weak he
^ras as vigorous mentally as ever. He
displayed a determination to put the
.fcest possible face upon his condition.
Jlsserted that he was feeling better
*nd outlined plana for the further de
velopment of the railroad properties
ttnder his control.
On arriving at his new home on the
Vountain top at Arden Mr. Harriman
fepe&tedly expressed his delight at
the progress which had been made
luring his absence in completing the
louse and grading the grounds and
declared his pleasure In getting home
•gain.
"The German food may be all right
§nd the champagne baths may be all
tight, but the rest cure right here will
le the only cuje for me," he declared.
He walked without assistance from
his car to his automobile at the Arden
ftatlon. Arriving at the house he as
sisted Mrs. Harriman from the cai
fcnd walked a distance of ftp block!
to the entrance.
:*Vv
COMPRISES EIGHT CRUISERS
Uncle Sam to Send Another "Peace"
Fleet Across Pacific.
Washington, Aug. 26. Another
"peace" fleet Is to be sent across the
Pacific by Uncle Sam. It will com
prise eight of the strongest and fast
est cruisers in the naval force and
will leave San Francisco a week from
next Sunday. It will be occupied with
Its mission, which is declared to be
friendly, more than five months.
The vessels which have .been or
dered to prepare for the journey are
the fully armored cruisers Tennessee,
California, South Dakota, Washington,
West Virginia, Colorado, Maryland
and Pennsylvania.
According to the navy department's
schedule of their 28,000-mile journey,
after making several side trips to Chi
nese and Japanese ports, the whole
squadron will reassemble at Yoko
hama and will sail for home Jan. 19,
1910.
NEED NO HELP FROM EAST
Western Banks Not Pressed for Cash
to Move Crops.
Washington, Aug. 26.—Western
banks and thoBe of the interior gen
erally are overflowing with money.
They can get along with little aid
from Eastern banks. This is the view
of Acting Secretary of the Treasury
Norton, who has just returned from
Beverly. Mass., where he had a con
ference with the president.
Any talk indicating that the banks
are pressed for money with which to
move the crops seems to be discount
ed by this view of the acting secre
tary.
MUST RESIGN FROM
POLITICAL POSITIONS
Letter From President Relating
to Census Supervisors.
Washington, Aug. 16.—President
Taft is leaving nothing undone to
make it clear that he does not intend
that census work and politics shall be
mixed. Acting Secretary McHarg of
the department of commerce and la
bor has received a letter from Mr.
Carpenter, secretary to the president,
stating that census supervisors who
hold political positions, such as sec
retaryships or chairmanships of coun
ty committees, must give up either
their political or government position.
In a number of states, particularly
In the South, Republican politicians
have been recommended for appoint
ment as supervisors of the census.
Complaint was made that as the su
pervisors have authority to appoint
enumerators it would be possible for
them to build up powerful political
positions.
Mr. Carpenter's letter was written
at the direction of the president and
Mr. McHarg immediately communi
cated its contents to Director Durand.
As this is not a season of political ac
tivity it is likely that the effect will
be wholesale resignations by persons
holding local Republican or Demo
cratic party positions.
DEFEATS WRIGHTS RECORD
French Aviator Exceeds Distance
Made by Americans.
Rhelms, France, Aug. 26.—Paulhatn,
the French aviator, flying over the
ten kilometer course here, beat the
distance record held previously by
the Wright brothers. He was com
peting for the Prix de la Champagne
and covered a distance of 131 kilo
meters (31.35 miles) in 2 hours, 4.}
minutes and 24 seconds. The Wright
record for distance is seventy-three
miles.
Glenn H. Curtis?, the only Ameri
can contestant in the aeroplane races
here, covered a lap of the course, six
and one-fifth miles, at a rate of speed
that, according to unofficial timing,
broke the record for this distance,
made Tuesday by Bleriot, 8 minutes
4% seconds. Curtiss himself made
the record that fell before Bleriot,
covering the distance in 8 minute*
35% seconds. But when the official
time was given out it was seen that
Curtiss had tied Bleriot. His time
also was S minutes 4^ seconds.
SIGNED BY THE GOVERNUn
Alabama's New Prohibition Coda Now
In Effect.
Montgomery, Ala., Aug. 26.—The
whole code of prohibition laws passed
by,the legislature at the session Just
adjourned has been signed by the
governor. They prevent the use or
distribution of liquors in clubs make
it unlawful for foreign corporations
to break the temperance laws provide
for impeachment of sheriffs who re
fuse to obey the laws make It the
duty of municipalities to fix and en
force prohibition laws like those in
efTect in the Gtate and prevent soft naands
drink stands from using screen* Qt V
storing liquors of any kind.
ASSERTS CHILD
WAS_P0IS0NED
tmeoffear Atfmtral Eaton
Makes Charge,
AUTOPSY WILL BE HELD
Mother e# Infant Also Declares That
an Attempt Was Made to Murder
Her by Placing Some Drug In Her
Tea—Husband of Woman Believes
Child Died From Natural Causes.
Boston, Aug. 26.—To ascertain If
Joseph Giles Eaton, Jr., the Infant son
Of Rear Admiral Joseph Giles Eaton,
United States navy, retired, died from
poison Medical Examiner J. W. Spoon
er of Hingham has forwarded the
stomach of the child to the Harvard
medical school, where the contents
will be analyzed by experts. The child
died Friday night at Isis cottage,
Scituate, the summer home of the
Eatons.
Statements of a startling nature are
made in connection with the child's
death by Mrs. Eaton and by June
Ainsworth, her daughter by a former
marriage. Both mother and daughter
told neighbors that attempts had been
trade to poison them.
Medical Examiner Spooner was
called into the case by Mrs. Eaton,
who insisted that an autopsy be per
formed on the Infant's body. When
Mrs. Eaton told him she was positive
toe baby died of poison an autopsy
was ordered. It was performed on
Saturday by Dr. Spooner.
Immediately after her return to Isis
cottage after the funeral Mrs. Eaton
talked with some neighbors and made
her sensational statements. She be
lieved fhe baby had been poisoned
and attributed the act to some de
mented person. At the same time she
Bald an attempt had been made to
poison her some months ago by plac
ing some drug in her tea,
Mrs. Ainsworth was married to Rear
Admiral Eaton three or four years
ago. She was about thirty-seven years
old and her husband sixty-two. The
baby, Joseph Giles Eaton. JT., was
born six months ago. Rear Admiral
Eaton says:
"I believe my son died a natural
death of cholera morbus. I believe
also that I felt his death far more
keenly than did the other members
of the family."
UNTIL HEARINGS ARE HELD
Kidnapped Child In Custody of Court
Official.
Kansas City, Aug. 26.—Marian
Bleakley, the five-year-old Incubator
baby of St. Louis world's fair fame,
who was kidnapped at Topeka last
Saturday from its mother, Mrs. J. J.
Blenkley, was placed temporarily in
the custody of the clerk of the juvenile
court at Kansas City.
An order to this effect was given
here by Judge Porterfleld in the cir
cuit court after he had postponed un
til next Monday hearings in the ha
beas corpus proceedings In the case.
During the proceedings Marian nes
tled in the lap of Mrs. Bleakley, who
sat Just in front of the judge's bench.
During Mr. Walsh's argument for the
immediate possession of the child
Mrs. Bleakley gave way to tears as
she caressed the little one. Mrs. Bar
clay sat unmoved beside one of her
attorneys in the rear of the room.
IN BIG INDUSTRIAL PLANTS
Red Cro33 to Instruct Workers In
First Aid to Injured.
Washington, Aug. 26.—Instruction
in first aid to the injured will be given
by the national Red Cross to thou
sands of employes of large corpora
tions, first among which will be those
of the United States Steel corpora
tion and the Pennsylvania Steel com
pany. During the last two yearB tfte
Red Cross has met with such success
in this work among corporation em
ployes that it is proposed to pursue
similar methods on a much larger
scale than in the past. Within the
next month more than 20,000 employes
Hf the Steel corporation will be in
structed.
As far as possible local physicians
will be utilized in giving this instruc
tion. Classes for Instruction will be
formed in overy large city of the
United 8tates.
WINNIPEG CARPENTERS QUI
Strike to Enforce Demand far If
creased Wages.
Winnipeg, Aug. 26.—Fifteen hun
dred union carpenter^ went on a
Btrike here, demanding a nine-hour
day and an increase toi pay of 5 cents
an hour. They have been getting 35
cents nu hour. Tho employing con
tractors refused to grant their de
f't
111(1 I.
rt» lo
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, .irRSDAY, AVGUST 26, 1909
BY RAIL AND WATEH ROUTE
Late
Hill to Enter San Francisco
Next Month.
Portland, Ore., Aug. 26.—James J.
Hill will be ready to deliver through
passenger business by combined rail
and water lines from Eastern points
to San Francisco in competition with
Harriman on and after Sept. 25. Joint
rnssenKef tariffs, operative over the
North Bank road and the North Pa
cific Steamship company's coasters,
the Elder and Roanoke, just have been
Issued and when the Elder sails from
Portland on Tuesday, Sept. 28, it will
carry the first through passengers for
California.
Tliis gives him accesB to territory
hitherto regarded as exclusively un
der the control of Harriman and re
prisals are likely.
HILL AND STRATHCONAHBET
Were Pioneers in Railroad Construe
tion in Northwest.
Winnipeg, Aug. 26.—J. J. Hill's spe
cial train came in ahead of time and
Lord Strathcona, who bad prepared to
meet him on arrival, was disappointed.
The two pioneers in railroad develop
ment la the West met at the Cana-
LORD STRATHCONA.
dian club luncheon and 1,500 citisens
cheered to the echo as th* Jasped
hands. After luncheon ad
dresses were delivered bjrvj hcoiia
and BIB, who were the guests of
honor.
LITTLE LOSS OF LIFE
ATTENDS THE SHOCK
Heavy Earthquake Felt til Pnw
te Siena,
lt%
Siena, Italy, Aug. 26.—A heavy
earthquake was felt throughout the
province of Siena. Practically all the
houses in San Ixrenzo were destroyed
or badly damaged. Many persons
were injured.
The quake was fait most severely
within a radius of twenty miles from
Siena. Considerable damage was done
at Buonoconvento. Several houses
collapsed and one person was killed.
Several persons were injured at Mon
teroni. A number of houses also were
damaged there and masonry fell Into
the streets.
The shock was recorded at Pioiu
blno, on the coast about fifty miles
southwest of Siena, and there was a
repetition five minutes later. The
people fled from their homes in terror,
bat no damage has been reported.
Biena itself escaped with a sever"
shaking. The people, however, rushed
out of their houses Into the street*,
where they wandered about in a stat
of semi-panic until they were assured
that the quakes were over.
HEADQUARTERS AT CHICAGO
Groat Western Offices to Be Removed
From 8t. Paul.
8t. Anil, Aug. 26.—The general
offices ©V the Chicago Great Western
railroad will be removed to Chicago
in the next few months. That state
ment was made by a representative
of the J. P. Morgan company in New
York. The president's office will be
located in Chicago as soon as S. M.
Felton, the new president, assumes
charge of the road, which will prob
ably be Sept. 1.
Just when the rest of the general
offices will be transferred Is not defi
nitely settled, but that all will be lo
cated there is assured.
Twelve Injured In Collision.
8t. I/mis, Aug. 26.—Twelve persons
were injured, two severely, when a
moving van carrying thirty persons
was struck by a work car in East St.
Louis. The van was overturned and
the occupants thrown into the
Btreet,
several being bruised and, crushed un
der tho vehicle,
BEGIN SEARCH FOR FIREARMS
Troopers Going Through Houses at
McKees Rocks, Pa.
Pittsburg, Aug. 25. With the
Pressed Steel Car company strike sit
tation apparently well in hand the
Pennsylvania troopers began the task
of searching houses in the trouble
zone for firearms. While not openly
re?entinsr the action of the troopers
the strikers are sullen, but are awed
by the police.
Under the auspices of tho United
States government the inquisition into
charges of peonage is being conducted.
S{ eeiril Agent Hoagland of Washing
ton: A. E. Anderson, attorney for the
Public Defense association W. N. Mc
NTair, counsel for the strikers mem
bers of the Austrian and Hungarian
consulates and newspaper representa
tlves make up the party. A thorough
search will be made ar.d statements
of men alleged to be foruiWy
in the plant taken.
SEQUEL TO HOTEL DISASTER
Former Proprietor Confesses to Fit
ing Building.
Victoria. B. C., Aug. 26.—The sequel
to the destruction by fire of the Oka
nagen hotel at Vernon, with a loss of
twelve human lives and the crippling
of five other inmates of the house,
now under surgical treatment at the
general hospital, promises to be the
revelation of one of the most remark
able rimes in provincial history.
Andrew Smith, ex-proprietor and
later bartender of the hout e, has dis
appeared, leaving a written confession
that he applied the torch, piqued by
Ms unfust eviction, nn he believed, be
fore the expiration of his lease.
In this confession he says he in
tends to silence accusing conscience
by forthwith committing suicide.
COURT HOLDS LAW INVALID
WORTH
MOUNTAINS
OFJOLD
During Change of Life,
says Mrs. Chas. Barclay
(1 raniteville, Vt.
thr
Vegetable
I was passing
ugli tlieChangeof Life and suffered
from nervousness
and other annoying
symptoms, and I
can truly say that
^ydiaE.rinkham's
Vegetable Com
pound has proved
worth mountains
of gold to me, as it
restored my health
and strength. I
never forget to tell
my friends what
LydiaE. Pinkham's
nd has done for me
during this trying period. Complete
rcirtorutkm to health means so much
to me that for the sake of other suffer
ing women I am willing to make
trouble public so you k
this letter."--Mns. CHAS. iJABGLAY,
lt.F.I).,(iraniteville, Vt.
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
President
for
McKees Rocks Strikers Asked
Compulsory Arbitration.
Pittsburg, Aug. 26.—In a decision
handed down by Judge Jamc3 A. Mac
Farland concerning the petition pre
sented by the striking employes of
the Pressed Steel Car company, in
which compulsory arbitration was
asked, the law is declared unconstitu
tional and the petition refused. The
court says before action can be had
both the strikers and company would
have to Join in the request for arbi
tration. The company opposed the
motion.
Wonderful 6ktn drafting.
Salem, Ore., Aug. 26.—Mias Irene
Martin, eighteen years old, of this
dty, has Ju£t undergone an operation
in which 400 square inches of skin
has been engrafted on her body. Sht
was recent'y teriously burned. Phy
sicians declare this the greatest, skin
grafting operation ever performed.
Phone 195
COAL
DR. H. P. GULSTINE,
"I
No other medicine for woman's ilia
has received such wide-spread and un
qualified endorsement. No other med
icine we know of has such a record
of cures of female ills as has Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.
For more than 80 years It has been
curing female complaints such a*
inilammation, ulceration, local weak
nesses, fibroid tumors, irregularities,
periodic pains, backache, indigestion
and nervous prostration, ana it is
unequalled for carrying women safely
through the period of change of life.
It costs but little to try Lydia £.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, and,
as Mrs Barclay says,it is worth moufr
tainfi of gold to suffering woman.
O-NIGHT
Peter Marquart & Son
MEMBER Of
t-ij* v? oijn_Mqrro_
HaKB'FcaNfiwd-li:
W. G. MARQUART,
PtIONf 293
Office
sver
The
Bit
E.
Stare MADISON, S. DAM
J.
COSTELLO
UNDERTAKER and EMBAIMER
Caskets and Funeral Supplies
Calls Answered Day or Night
Phone 114 MADISON, S. D.
Guaranteed Cement
Construction
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
—the
C0AU COAL!
Every ton is nice and clean fresh front
the minuBf i.'
PHONE 256
We handle only th4
best and deliver to
all parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
-.OWTIS^i
'.v.V.y
,M. "li"**1' "t'-i Jf*"
*j
Cement Walks,
Foundations, Bridges,
Culverts, anything
and everything
in
-«=SEEm«
Phong
KENNEDY,*
Vice President.
Lf ft 4*4^5
*'V -'V 4'^,
'"Si!-,*'
Madison- Stdfe Bank
,VD
FARM LOANS AT LOWEST
HATES
Let us filf your Coal Bin for this winter
with our superior quality of
HARD AND SOFT COAL
E. W. KETCHAM
COAL
§ynr
^Oixir^Seana
da
McDANIEL & TRIMMER
CONSULTING CIVIL ENGINE9S
Special Attention Given
It
Land Dranase and
Ssmjt
CHAS. A. TRIMMER, MADISON, S.D.
'v'. s»i«air.as4i:":'
acts gently^yet prompt
ly on the bowels, cleanses
fKe system e||ectup)l|^
assisfe one in overcoming
habitual WisttoaHon
permanently. lQ As
beneficial
tke genuine.
v
,%jt
*--1
263
COAL'
•«a
-3
&
&
•f',
/v-

xml | txt