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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 28, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1909-09-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWELVE OF HER
0REW_10WNE0
Norwegian Vessel Fmmders
Off Atlantic Coast.
SIX MEN ESCAPE DEATH
Manage ta Reach Lightship Off Cap*
Henlopen, Where They Must Await
Better Weather Before They Can Be
Taken Off—Newt of the Disaster
Brought to Baltimore by a Passing
Steamer.
Baltimore Sept Wr-W* sunrlT©rs
out of a crew of eighteen of a Nor
wegian steamer are aboard Winter
Quarter lightship, the remaining
twelve men having perished, accord
ing to a report made by Captain Del
ano of the steamer Poito Rico, which
arrived here from New York. The
vessel fouAderod nine miles northeast
of the lightship.
Captain Delano stated that an the
Porto Rico was passing Winter Quivr
ter light a signal was seen flying from
the lightship. A heavy northeast wind
prevailed. He ordered his ship to run
close to the light station and when as
near as consistent with safety an at
tempt was made to communicate by
megaphones.
It was difficult work with the wind
whistling about the superstructure of
the ships, but enough was learned to
realize that a ship had foundered.
The captain of the lightship said that
there were aboard his vessel six sur
•Ivors from the ill fated ship and
asked that they be taken off If ponsi
ble. Captain Delano considered th"
matter carefully and decided that it
would be tempting death again to try
to make the transfer
under
weather conditions prevailing.
FINNS MAY START REVOLT
Russian Duma Expected to Terminate
Finnish Home Rule.
Helsingfors, Finland, Sept. 28.—In
anticipation of the Russian duma's
early passage of the bill depriving
Finland of ts liberty and reducing it
to a mere parliamentary district of
the czar's r-untry Finnish revolution
its are trying to hasten along the long
threatened uprising against Muscovite
rule.
The climax in Russia's encroach
ment upon Finland^ constitutional
rights came a few days ago. when It
was announced that the St. Peters
burg government had decided to wait
no longer for a report from the Ttusso
Finnish commission appointed to de
fine the lesser country's rights, but to
secure legislation lmnediately ter
minating Finnish home rule and al
lowing Finland no more than five
in the duma.
Fireman Dies of Injuries.
Minneapolis, Sept. 28.—Captain Dan
iel L. Kane of the fire department,
who was overcome while trying to res
cue four persons from a Are, is dead
at the city hospital from suffocation.
Captain Kane was found In one of the
rooms unconscious and never regained
his senses. The four persons for
whom the brave fireman lost his Ufa
fat out safely down a rear Are escape.
Tatt Endorse* tsannara.
Jfew York, Sept. 28 —A message
from President Taft expressing the
hope that Otto T. Unnnard, the Re
publican nominee, will be elected
mayor of New York city was received
by Representative Tl rbert. Parsons,
chairman of the New Yoxlt county &•»
publican committal.
"s"'
V
'5
A.
V'
•mart?
I#
iHliliU- The only Baking Powder
made from Royal Grap^ Cream ol Tartar
Insures the most
delicious and healthful food
ABSOLUTE1! V PURE
VfcOMEN UNFIT FOR SUFFRAGE
Chicago Priest Also Ccndamna Tight
Fitting Gowns.
Chicago, Sept. 28.—Suffragettes, suf
fragists and other varieties of women
aspiring to activity outside the home
were dealt with in terms of withering
scorn by Rev. Father Michael in an
address at the Illinois theater. Women
were declared to be by nature abso
lutely unfitted for the right of suf
frage.
Father Miciiael drew a sad picture
of the suffragist's neglected husband,
who remains at home caring for the
lap dox. which takes the place of chil
dren in hi« wile's affections, while
wife is out "complaining. lecturing
and voting."
The revt-n-ml fattier tuined his at
tention to fashions in dress and as
serted that tight tilting gowns are de
serving of rebuke because of their
womanly appearance.
SAYS NO COMBINE EXISTS
George P. Baer on Stand in Coal Truat
Hearing.
Philadelphia, Sept. 2S.—"There has
never been,, .an agreement, combina
tion or conspiracy betwe% the com
panics i represent and any other coal
or railroad com panics to control the
output or sale of anthracite coal." de
clared George F. llaer of the Reading
11
the
41
GEORGE F. BAER.
company when the hearing of th^gor
ernment's suit to dissolve the alleged
hard coal trust was resumed 4n the
federal building here.
Mr. Baer, who appeared on the
stand for the first time In the two
years the case has been under way,
spoke for both the Reading companies
and the Jersey Central railroad and
Lehigh and Wilkesharre company, of
which he is tire head. He entered a
specific denial to all the charges con
tained in the complaint of the govern
ment filed in Juno,v19rt7. While on
the stand the anthracite leader gave
much interesting information regard
ing the natural law df prices, produc
tion, etc.
MAYOR FIXES "KICKING DAY
Resident* of Cincinnati Given Chane*
to Make Complaint*.
Cincinnati. Sept. 28.—Mayor Joht
Galvln, carrying ogt his Idea of uni
formity In all things possible, has
established a "kicking day" for the
residents of Cincinnati. On that das
they can ro to the cjty hall and se
either him or his secretary and reg
later their complaints.
Thursday is his Jonah day. How
ever, there are not so many com
plaints coming In as he thought there
would be. Approximately 500 already
have been made, but hardly any of
them are of moment.
Galvln says folka who have kick*
can make them at his office on one
day nnd he and his secretary and the
"city cabinet" can enumerate and at
tend to them in order.
i S.'-"
Ml/
tf
mk..
Jfi
iJfrL'V 4. A# ii- 'iii'i
HALF HUNDRED
IT
Expfcsftn Wrecks Pittstrarg
Office building.
ONE WALL IS BLOWN Ol'T
Othera Are BwMy Damaged and the
Authorities Have Ordereo Them
Razed—Occupants of the Building
8creaming From Pain and Fright,
Rush Panic Stricken to the Street
Many Falling Down the Stairways.
Pittsburg, Sept. 28.—A terrific ex
plosion occurred in the offices of th
Columbian Film Exchange, located in
the Ferguson building, in the heart of
the down town district. From fifty to
seventy-five persons were injured
many
of them seriously, and the mon
etary damage 1* estimated at $200,000
or more.
At tirst It was believed seven em
ployes of the film company had lost
their lives, but a thorough search of
th^ ruins failed to disclose any dead
The employes, it Is now thought, made
their scape.
A score of the injured were taken
to hospitals. The majority of the in
jured were burned the others sus
tained fractured arms and legs.
The force of the explosion was so
great that the south wall of the Fer
guson building was blown out. The
remaining walls were badly damaged
and the building inspector immediate
ly ordered them razed. Windows for
fully a square on either side of the
explosion were broken. A number of
pedestrians making their way alon
Fourth avenue, the "Wall street" of
Pittsburg, were cut by falling glas^
The explosion was caused by an elec
tric spark.
Occupants Rush From Building.
Practically every office In the build
lng was damaged. Panic stricken the'
occupants made a wild rush for th
exits. Men and women ran screamin
from pain and fright, many of thein
falling down the stairways. Others
congregated about the elevator shafts
and In their efforts to board the cars
wrecked the iron framework encasing
the shaft. As most of the occupant
of the building finally reached the
street they fell to the ground suffer
ing from burns, cuts and bruises.
The accident threw the down town
district into great excitement. Spe
cial detachments of police were ne»
sary to clear from the streets thou
sands of persons who for a time were
In Imminent dunger of a second ex
plosion.
Shortly befora 3 o'clock all the em
ploye* of t,h« IHw company were
found. John Illletta, special clerk,
mad* a statement In which be said
the explosion occurred In the vault
•illletta said he w«»nt Into the vault,
which Is three feet wide and six feet
bip,h, to get a film. When he turned
the electric light on a spark shot
from the switch and Ignited one of
the films. He Jumped from the vault,
slammed the door and shouted to the
others to run. As they reached, the
oorrtdor rb« explosion occurred.
Boy Hunter Kilts Companion.
Langdon, N. D., Sept. 28—George
Alpstag, aged seventeen, was accident
ally sb/ot and killed by Stanley Walk
er. aged fifteen, at Wllliston lake,
southeast of Lan&dop. while hunting
Jaalssiap Qauaa o#
Lyons, N«b., Sept. 28.—Albert Ba
ker. owner of the Raker Theatrical
oompany, shot and killed his wife and
than killed himself at the home of his
an hare. Jealousy was tha cause.
m. XL •lb •iM
MADISON. SOITH DAK OVA, TIISDAY, SEPTEMHEH 28, 1909
TAFT PAYS VISIT
TO COPPER MINE
Descends Into Underground
Workings at Butte.
SEES ANACONDA SMELTERS
President Much Impressed With tha
Extent of the Mining Industry tn
the Two Montana Cities—Tendon
Sprained Before Leaving Beverly
Causes Executive ta Wal« With a
Decided Limp.
Butte, Mont., Sept 28.—When Pres
ident Taft arrived In Butte lie found
city eager to welcome him. the
streets gay with bunting and nothing
in sight to mar his reception. He was
welcomed at the depot by a big recep
tion committee. Automobiles took
him and his party over the line of
parade mapped out several days ago
and after a speech by him on North
Montana street opposite the court
house he was whisked away to his(
train and started on the Journey to
Helena, where he was welcomed by
thousands of people at the state fair
grounds.
When the parade here, headed by
the president, reached the speakers'
stand former Senator Lee Mantle in
troduced the president to Mayor
Nevis, who, in turn, presented Mr.
Taft to the throng. As in other cities
the school children formed a feature
of the greeting to the president. The
children all carried flags and saluted
the chief executive as he passed in
his motor.
Strike Causes Change In Plans.
Trouble between the Western Fed
eration of Miners and the organiza
tion ot the engineers in the mines
caused a change in the original pro
gramme. It had been planned for Mr.
Taft to spend some time in the mlne^
and smelters here, but when labor
troubles became acute last week the
committee changed the arrangement
so that a part of the time was spent
at Anaconda, where the smelters were
visited and examined. The president
took a lively interest in all he saw and
seemed to be much impressed with
the extent of the Industry at Anar
conda and Butte.
The labor trouble, which was caused
by the engineers withdrawing from
the federation and forming an Inde
pendent organization, gave the police
officers some apprehension and extra
precautions were taken to safeguard
the president. Both the sheriff and
the chief of police added many men
to their regular forcea.
Taft Walks With a Limp.
The president had a decided limp
in his walk when he alighted from his
special train here. He sprained a
tendon in his foot before leaving Bev
erly, but had suffered no bother until
Sunday, when, after ten days of con
stant going with little or no rest, the
foot became swollen. Dr. Richardson,
who accompanies the president, is
treating the strained tendon. The
hurt is not serious, but is causing dis
comfort.
The president was met at the sta
tion by a band and a long line of auto
mobiles. After speaking In the court
house square he was taken to the
famous old Leonard copper mine and,
entering a cage with John Hays Ham
mend, was taken down a damp and
darksome shaft to the 1,200-foot level,
wtiere he saw the miners at work in
the midst of drills and all the other
paraphernalia of deep underground
labor.
BUTTE DISPUTE ADJUSTED
Trouble Affecting Most of Her Mines
Is Settled.
Butte, Mont., Sept. 28.—The labor
trouble which threatened to tie up
this camp, shut down the smelters in
Anaconda and Great Falls and throw
11!,000 people out of work throughout
the state has been settled.
While no official statement of the
agreement has been given out it is
known that the contentions ot the
Miners' union were sustained and the
seceding engineers who withdrew
from tha Western Federation of Min
ers have gone back into the fold. All
will be received and given their old
positions.
BY ATTACK OF APPENDICITIS
Assistant Secretary of Mat* Wilson
Seriously III.
Washington, Sept. 28.—Suffering
from a second attack of appendicitis
Huntington Wilson, assistant secre
tary of state, is kept from attendance
"Bpon the Hudson-Fulton celebration In
New York. He was to have officially
represented the state department
there. The attack of Illness followed
lard upon Mr. Wilson's etftertalnmenv
,of Prince Kuni of Japan in this city
S few days ago.
'0k
A
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^wuMWWWlll
****&*-•>•
EXAMINES PEARY S RECORDS
President of Arctic Club Goes Ovar
Explorer's Data.~
Par Harboi, Me., Sept. 25.—General
Thomas H. Hubbard, president of th
Peary Arctic club, has examined th
data and observations of Commando
Robert Peary's dash to the poU
[General Hubbard also looked Into th
information which Commander Poar
has obtained on the question, "Ha
Cook been at the pole?"
The examination la preliminary t*
a conference here Monday
The course likely to be pursued
Commander Peary is to proceed wit
the development of his own seientlf
data and its submission to the necei
sary scientific bodies to prove hi
finding of the pole without regard I
any question of whether Dr. Cook h«
been to the pole.
KILLS WOMAN AND HIMSELF
Vermont Man Wanted Her to Leave
Her Husband.
8t. Johnsbury, Yu, Sept. 27.—lnf«i
uated with Mrs. Kate Frey, wife of ,i
blacksmith, and infuriated becnus
she refused to abandon her husband
and children and live with him, Ab
Hartshorn, a farmer, shot and kilh I
the woman at Danville, llart&ho: ii
then ended his life with a bullet. Hi
was sixty years of age and is sin
vtved by a vife and four children.
The murdered woman was thirtv-fl.
years old and was a sister of C„ 1'
Bonn«tte, a well known balloonist.
PASSING OF NOTED PEOPLE
HAKRY 3. SMITH, prosideut oi
Citizens National bank of ITartfo: 1
City, Ind., president of the I2v»nsvll
and Southern Indiana Traction cot
pany, a principal stockholder :n oth
inter urban railroads and a prooilneu'
figure in Indiana Democracy, died su.l
denly at Fort Wayne, Jnd.
PATTEN NOW COTTON KING
Says There Are Lively Times Ahe.-.d
for tho Market.
Now York. Sept. 27.—Jamea A. Pit
ten. the new king of the N'ew Yck
Cotton Exchange, has returned to I
cage, leaving a scaring market in 1 i
wake. Mr. Patten is credited to ha
been "right" on the short supply
cotton to the extent of annexing $
000,000 to his already ample bank roM
"I shall he back in November," sai.
Mr. Patten. 'But there are some lh
ly t.mes ahead in cotton. My goiu
will not spoil the market. We are n
against a short crop and from now on
until another crop is picked there
going to be something doing In
ton."
Deafceee Cannot he Cured
by local applications, as they oanm.t
rcach the diseased portion of the ear
There is only one way to cure de*fntHn
and that is by constitutional remedies.
Deafness is caused by an inflamed ceo
ditionof the mucous lining of the Ki
stachian Tube. When this tube is in
flamed you have a rumbling sound or
imperfect hearing, and when it is en
tiielv elost-d, deafness is the result, ami
unless the inflamation can be taken out
and this tube is restored to its uormal
condition, bearing will be destrojed for
ever nine canes out of ten are caused by
catarrh, whirl) is nothing but an in
tlaiued condition of the mucous surfaces.
We will give One Hundred Dollars for
any case of deafness caused by catarrh)
that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh
Cure. Send for circulars, free.
F. J. CH KN'EY & CO Toledo, O.
Hold by Druggists, 75.
Take Hall's Family Pills for oonstipation
Mr. P. G. Fritte, Oneonta, N. Y.,
writes: "My little gi'1 was greatly ben
efitted by taking Foley's Oriuo Laxa
tive, and I hitk it is the best remedy
for constiprtion and liver trouble."
Foley's Oriuo Laxative is best for women
and children, as it is mild, pleasant and
effective, and is a splendid spring rnedi
cin»», as it cleanses the svsteiu and
liears the connection.--J. H. Anderson
E. J. COSTELLO
UNDERTAKER and EMBALMER
Caskets and Funeral Supplies
Calls Answered Day or Night
Phone 114 MADISON, S. D.
DR. P. GULSTINE,
...DENTIST^
•HONf 293
Office ovw The Bit Start MADISON. S. DAM
MCDANIEL & TRIMMER
CONSULTING CIVIL ENGINEERS
Special Attention Given to
jr
ftr
Tuesdaj
when Commander Peary probably wi
submit further records and supply an
needful information not contained lr.
the rough draft ot his preliminary
ports.
Land Drainage and Sarreys ______
.1
Phone 195
COAL
ulUL
mwH
Peter Marquart & Son
MEMBER OF
•iOTTO
HONEST CONCRETE
W. G. MARQUART,
CHAS. B. KENNEDY
Presided
R. W.THOMPSON,
Cement Walks,
Foundations, Bridget,
Culverts, anything
Mid everything
Guaranteed Cement
Construction
Phone
or Leave Orders With Hackett & Sutton
THE
Madison State Bank
MADISON, 1
FARM ,10ANS AT LOWEST POSSIBLE
RATES
COAL' COAL! COAL!
l-et us fill your Coal Bin for this wintMT
With our superior quality of
HARD AND SOFT COAL
Every ton it nice and dean fresh front
the mine.
PHONE 236
We handle only the
best and deliver to
fdl parts of the city
JONES BROS. GRAIN CO.
ClhFU/AI |/C Concrete Foundations
XV HLIiOj
CHAS. A. TRIMMER, MADISON, S.D.1 DeWilt's Kidney and Blattw HlliDtWItt'i Kidnir tod Bladder Piila
cm FOR BACKACHEFOR BACKACHE
Green 263
C.
KENNEDY,*
Vice President
W. KETCHAM
COAL
READE & PAULSON
PRACTICAL SHOEING
Located at the Croom McLean
Shop, Shoe the lame and the sound.
SHOE THEM ALL.
and
BRIDGES
ALl WORK GUARANTEED
Brookings Cement Co.
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