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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, February 24, 1920, Image 1

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WILL VETO R. R. BILL
UNION MEN CONTEND THE BILL
DOES NOT GIVE SQUARE
DEAL.
|Pashington, D. C., Feb. S4.—~The
railroad union men today are confi
dent that President Wilson will veto
the Esch-Cummins railroad bill. The
measure was passed by the senate late
yesterday by a vote of 47 to 17 and
was sent to the president today. It
passed the house last Saturday. Rail
road union men's confidence of a
presidential veto is based upon what
they interpret as promises of a square
deal made by the president last sum
mer when he asked them to postpone
pressing their wage demands pending
the result of" government effort to
bring down the high prices. The
union men contend that the labor sec
tion of the Esch-Cummins bill does
not give them a square deal. What
action President Wilson will take
probably will be influenced by Rail
road Director Hines.
THE Miclir
WARRANTS OF ARREST ISSUED
FOR LOCAL OFFICIAMk
Marquette, Mich., Feb. 24.—J. V.
Dalrymple, prohibition agent of Chi
cago arrived here at 8 this morning
seeking warrants from Court Com
missioner Hatch for the arrest of
the county officials of Iron River for
interfering with the prohibition en
forcement.
Marquette, Mich., Feb. 14.—-War
rants for the arrest of Martin McDon
ohue, prosecuting attorney for Iron
county, and other officials alleged to
have interfered with the enforcement
of prohibition in Michigan were re
fused today by United States Commis
sioner Hatch here. When called
upon by Major A. V. Dalrymple of
Chicago for warrants, Commissioner
Hatch said he could not issue them
without instructions from either Dis
trict Attorney Walker of Grand Rap
ids, Judge Clarence Sessions or At
torney General Palmer.
Marquette, Michigan, Feb. 24.
Dalrymple prepared to leave for Iron
River at 2 o'clock to make arrests
whether warrants were received or
not.
WISH SECRET
BY ORDER OF A COURT OF THE
IRISH REPUBLIC.
Cork Ireland, Feb. 24.—Positive
evidence of deliberate execution of
a British secret agent by order of a
court of the Irish republic came to
light here today, it was learned from
reliable sources. Investigation into
the death of Harry Quinnlisk has re
vealed he was sentenced to death by
Sinn Fen court martial. After find
ings of the court were read by flash
light, Quinnlisk was given three min
utes in which to pray. His body was
riddled with bullets.
o
Council of Premiers
to Investigate Russia
Meat Packing
Under Investigation
Washington, D. C„ Feb. I«^-The
ninth congressional investigation into
the meat packing Industry in the last
four year* was to start today before
*he house agricultural committee.
•They will attempt to determine
Whether reguUUve is acc
essary.
Washington, 15. C., Feb. 24.—The
United States bureau of investigation
is hunting evidence against retail
/lueat profiteers in every section ol the
Country, the department of justice an
feotiMed, and arrests are expected.
Minister to
the Netherlands
Washington, Feb. 24.—Nomination
of William Phillips, first secretary of
state, to be minister to Netherlands
was sent to t\ie senate by President
Wilson.
E
PLACE IN AMERICA"
THEY MUST BE ELIMINATED
SAYS VICE PRESIDENT.
New York, Feb. 24.
—Personal suc
cess as an element of American citi
tenship should be subordinated to
the common gcod, declared Vice Pres
ident Thomas R. Marshall at a Wash
ington's birthday service held by the
Society of Tammany here. Com
menting on the declaration of Jeffer
son that all men are entitled to life,
liberty and the pursuit of happiness,
Mr. Marshall said that liberty and
life have a different meaning than
they had even 50 years ago.
"Life consists in somebody having
some good thought for his fellow
man," the vice president continued,
"and death will come to the man
who goes about his business, piling
up his money and giving no thought
to the good of those about him." He
added:
"Jefferson, you will notice, did not
say a man has a right to happiness.
Oh. no he knew most of us might
get married. Jefferson was not going
to give any guarantee."
Americans should be Americans in
reality and not in name only, Mr.
Marshall said. "I am tired of the
hyphenated American," he continued.
"It cost an awful lot to get rid of the
German-American hyphen. We can
get rid of the other hyphens by edu
cation and enlightenment."
The man who does not believe in
God was classed by the vice presi
dent as a menace to the country. "We
Uhould remember the advice of Wash
ington that a country cannot get
along wihout morality, and we cannot
have morality without we have relig
ion," he said. "A man is either re
ligious or superstitious. For my part
I had rather believe in the living God
than in the fqafc a grave
yard rabbit.**
Compensation Cast
Won By Plaintiff
Webster, Feb. J4,—Ander
son of the state circuit court, render
ed an important decision bearing on
the state workman's compensation
»ct, in a case arising in Day county.
The suit was brought by the heirs
of Claud L. ghaw, who was killed in
an auto accident south of Webster,
the defendant being the Harms Piano
company of Webster.
The case as tried on appeal before
Judge Anderson from a judgment
rendered by the state industrial com
mission, which has charge of the en
forcement of the workman's compen
sation law.
Judge Anderson, after hearing and
considering the testimony In the case,
rendered a decision in favor of the
jShaw estate, thus awarding the
estate the sum of $2,000, the amount
"of insurance claimed in behalf of the
heirs.
It is said this is the first case of
the kind to be tried under the work
men's compensation act
London. Peti. council of
."J?*
premiers has decided to ask the
league of nations to send a commis
sion to Russia to study the situation
theme. They officially announced
"We cannot take up diplomatic rela
tions with soviets in view of past ex
periences until we are convinced that
bolshevik horrors have ended," the
official statement said.
o ,,t
appealed to the state supreme court
which will have the duty of affirm
ing or reversing the decision of Judge
Anderson
To, Ship Flour v'
to Suffering Europe
Ttew'Yatot,' feb. 2^-^Tftfe trailed
States Grain corporation awaits only
authorization from congress to begin
shipment of 10,000,000 barrels of
flour to cities in Austria, Hungary,
Holland, Bohemia and Armenia it was
learned today. An appeal for this
flour was made recently by Ameri
can relief search.
A'
to**
7 ,* 1 i1*
itlatii
RETAIL MEAT DEALERS
ATTORNEY GENERAL DECLARES
DROP IN PRICE MEANS LESS
COST TO CONSUMER.
Chicago, Feb. 24.—Retail meat
dealers throughout the country must
reduce their prices as the wholesale
price of meat declines or else submit
their books to federal agents for in
vestigation of their profits.
Th is definition of the government's
attitude was announced here by At
torney General Palmer. Instructions
to serve the notice on all retail meat
dealers have been sent to every Unit
ed States district attorney, he said.
"For three months the wholesale
price of meat has been falling," said
Mr. Palmer. "The retail dealers
have claimed that their supplies were
old stocks purchased at the higher
prices. The eld stocks should be ex
hausted by this time, and unless the
price to the consumer comes down we
will have to look into the question of
the dealer's profits."
The attorney general also announc
ed that the terms of the agreement
for the dissolution of the allied inter
ests of the five big Chicago packers
had been settled and would be filed
in federal court next Friday. He de
clined to state in what court the case
was to be filed.
Mr. Palmer'3"pronouncement on the
meat price situation follows the pub
lication by the Institute of American
Meat Packers of a bulletin announc
ing the practical cessation of foreign
trade as a result of the adverse ex
change situation. Wholesale meat
prices at the Chicago stock yards
dropped to pre-war levels for some
grades, following the publication.
SOUTH DAKOTA BILL
E
I
MITCHELL, \VATERTOWN, ABER­
DEEN, REDFIELD, HURON
AND SIOUX FALLS.
Mitchell, Feb. 24.—The first steps
to form a South Dakota baseball
league will be taken early next month
at Redfield, when independent club
managers from Mitchell, Watertown,
Aberdeen, Redfield, rfuron and Sioux
Falls will meet to discuss the 1920
season.
Watertown is the only one of these
six towns that has not already made
tentative plans for a ball club this
season. It is expected, however, that
that place will bo represented at the
session. If Watertown does not join
the league .some other town probably
Will
be selected. Whether the state
organization will be composed of six
or eight clubs will be decided at Red
field.
Baseball interest was revived all
over the«6tate last year and it is ex
pected that there will be little trou
ble in organizing a state league this
year.
Baseball talk is being revived early
in the state in order that those towns
which will have clubs will be aoTe to
secure good material as early as pos
sible. It has been decided to limit
the salary roll of each club la $1,800
a month.
The Redfield meeting will be open
to every town in the state and an ef
fort will be made to see that other
places besides the six cities which are
taking the organization steps are rep
resented at the meeting.
o
Assign Large
Sum for Trail
Atetiflfeen, 24.—Over $W0,
000 will be expended on the Yellow
stone Trail in South Dakota during
1920, it was announced by J. R. Hub
bart, South Dakota member of the ex
ecutive committee of the trail asso
ciation, upon his return from the an
nual meeting of the committee in Mil
waukee.
The committee will also work to
secure either a separate bridge for
automobiles over the Missouri river
at Mobridge or extending the present
Milwaukee railroad bridge by means
of a wing to its floor.
-0-
Jury Agreed
Lowden for President
Sioux Falls, Feb. S4.—The Jury
*jrhich tried the ease ol the Slaughter-
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, TOESDAY, FEBRUARY 24,1920
Burke grain commission company
versus J. L. Jolfetson in circuit court
this week couldn't agree as to the
guilt or innocence of the defendant,
and after arguing on the case among
themselves for about lg hours the
members were dismissed by the
judge, but on another question there
was considerably less differences of
opinion, it has now been disclosed.
During their deliberations, and
When all were tired of listening co
arguments by the other fellow, some
one proposed as a diversion that a
straw vote be taken on the preference
of the jurymen for a presidential can
didate. This was done, and the very
first ballot showed that there was at
least one. question upon which they
all agreed for all 12 of the members
had cast their vote for Governor
Frank O. Lowdcn, of Illinois as the
republican candidate for the presi
dency.
REBUFFS FOR SUFE
PLAN Or PRMINIST L^AHl»!llft WR
CONGRESS IN MADRID IS
ABANDONED.
Madrid, Feb. 24.—Reports reach
ing here that the International Wom
an Suffrage alliance has abandoned
the idea of holding a congress in Ma
drid next May came as a surprise
Six Boys Pay $1,230
for Six Duroc Swine
Sioux Falls, Feft. 21.—Six boys of
the Valley Springs boys' pig club pur
chased six purebred Duroc hogs at
prices ranging from $115 to $360,
totaling $1,230, at tbe sale of Spies
brothers at Valley Springs yesterday
afternoon. This was the seventh an
nual sale of pure-bred Durocs held
by Spies brothers who are among the
most prominent breeders of the coun
ty. Fifty head averaged $222, which
is the highest average of any Minne
haha county Duroc breeder this sea
son, and the top sold for $560 to F.
L. Gale of Philip.
The six boys who bid In for and
bought the hogs, and the prices paid,
are: Lynn Outkc, $180, Edward
Johnson, $220, Henry Key man $140,
Jean York, $360, Iloland Skillman
$115, and John Klovstad, $215. These
farmer boys are planning on enter
ing the livestock bu^isness and are
laying foundations by
good blooded sowa.
rhe Peace Treaty
Up Thursday
Washington, Feb. 24.-—Republican
leaders have decided to forco the
issue on the peace treaty and bring
it to a final showdown without more
delay. Senator Lodge gave notice
that he will call the treaty u» Thurs
day for final disposition.
Increased Exports
for January
Washington, D. C., Feb. 24.—Ex
ports for January totaled $731,000,
000, an increase of $49,000,000 over
December, the bureau otf foreign and
domestic commerce announced, lm
ports for January were
cember,
_r.
Stotto
i—fc i
1
to
feminist leaders here. The Marquesa
del Ter, president of the Union
of
Spanish Women, told the Associated
Press correspondent today that the
efforts to arrange for the congress
had met with many difficulties, but
still were, progressing.
The marquesa declared the femin
ist movement had found sympathizers
among every class of Spanish society
with the possible exception of the
clericals, whose leaders strongly op
pose any effort at the emancipation of
women .especially in a political sense
Marquesa del Ter, who has par
ticipated in the feminist movement in
England and France, said she had
virtually obtained use tf the Royal
theater for the congress meetings, but
that later such strong pressure had
been brought to bear by the clericals
that assent had been withdrawn. She
added, however, that she intends
making a direct appeal to King A1
fonso. The marquesa also discussed
the possibility of engaging another
meeting place.
The archbishop of Madrid lias come
out strongly against feminism, but
approves the formation of women's
societies under the presidency and
control of the clergy.
$414,000,000.
tacraus of WO,000 oyer
*'v
.V
w
THHffiLfNO SPORT IN litfHEG.
TION WITH CROSSING ON
it
.... J!
WEAKENED I(fe^
Yankton, Feb. 24.—It is not neces
sary to leave Yankton at present to
enjoy real full-sized thrills as a loop
the loop fully as dangerous and full
of thrills as ev«r was devised by an
amusement company for an admiring
audience, can be seen at the Missouri
river. 1
The performance, which Is contin
uous, is being staged just east of
where the ferryboat the "Josle L. K."
is being repaired, ready for the wa
ter when the river opens up. I
About 50 feet east of where the
river "blew up" recently is a road
across the ice. It Is called a "road"
by courtesy, so that this story can
be made clear. At the Dakota end
cars that negotiate the entrance to the i
road go over a series of bumps that
make all on board hang on for dear'
life.
Then comes a smooth shoot out on
the ice. This part of the shoot has
to be done quickly or the vehicle will
disappear beneath winter's icy em-
i
brace of Old Muddy.
With a wild abandon the driver
plunges forward. He looks death in
the eye in the first few seconds and
keeps winking at the Grim Reaper 1
all the way across. Several
times
the car will hit water on the ice ami:
send it flying 15 feet.
The sight sometimes suggests
a
yacht race and at other times one is
reminded of "What fools these mor
tals be," and other classic sayings
expressing the same thought. Just
why people will do this sort of thin?,r
in the face of several tragedies al
ready reported on the Missoi)ri one
does not quite know.
Perhaps the great war has trained
folks to indifference to danger, but it
is more likely "durned fool crazi
ness."
A number of cars with women folks
on board, sometimes a whole family,
hit this dangerous shoot. Two cross
ings have been worked out on the
ice "Y" shape and passengers for Ne
braska take their choice of the left
or right arm of this "Y."
From the ferryboat the spectacle is
highly interesting ,as bets were made
whether the last car attempting the
crossing would make it or "go be
low."
Not many Yankton people would
care to walk out where these autos
were passing. It is a thrill, all ftUffet,
to watch the dangerous sport.
Whole Family Is
Wiped Out By Flu
Tffgfttnore, Feb. f4.—fftflwcftw has
wiped out an entire Highmore family
of four persons, with the exception of
a 1-week-old baby girl. L. Woolard,
the husband, was the first of the fam
ily to succumb. The death of his wife
followed, and that of Merle, 10-year
old daughter, occurred next day. A
nurse from Iowa, who came to High
more to take care of the family, also
died.
Doris KJelmyr, the 12-year-old
daughter of S. G. Kjelmyr, who liv« 3
here, is dead. Hers was the third
death in this home the past week. An
other daughter, Virginia, 14 years
old, and Miss Ithoda McCune, house
keeper for the family for a number
of years, both died and were buried
in Mitchell.
The six members of the family were
all ill with the influenza, which
brought on pneumonia In the case of
the three who died. The others have
recovered.
V
Independent Dray Line
HEAVY AND LIGHT TEAM
WORK of iD kinds. W# do
ttjrtfclag ia the
way
S'
K
Daily Market Report
&
.1 V
Sioux City, Feb. 24.—With the
upper limit at $14, the bulk of the
sale which went to packers, ran from
$13.40^13.90. Very weighty droves
went under $13.
of Hauliag.
Phone 2119 or Call oa
msmmmmmmmBtssamsmtaaaammmu
DBS. KELLOGG and
ALLISON
Physicians and Surg
TELKPHQNH2U3
eons
madison,
a a
W:,
4
IN BANKING
The constantly increasing number of our
depositors answers best the able manner in whicll
Aye care for the interests of our patrons.
"*AVe invite you to favor us with a visit relative
fo opening an account.
DAKOTA STATE BANK:
Madison, South Dakota
Scrap iron and rags are high. Bring your iron in and
get the highest prices. We also buy second-handed cars,
Hides, Furs and Junk of all descriptions^ v
Northwestern Hide & Junk
PHONE 2201 MADISON, S. D.
OUR IDEA
E. W. KETCHAM & SON
.." COAL
^entadoHfef^ r- Hard
Coke
Splint Lump
large and Small Briquets
PHONl
THE'TEST OF ALL
OLE HIGHLAND
FIIRNITI'RE AND BUGS
i Buy and
Sell
New iueh
Hand Furniture and Stoves
Madison Electric Co.
WIRING. FIXTURES, MOTOBS
SUPPLIES
1M Ave. 8. VMRSlUI.
DR. a P. GULSTINE
OfBee Over BafcMa State Mil
tSH
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Las'5? ,' z1*
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Service to oar customers and
to the community In which
do business.
We wa«t our customer* to feel «t fcome, whether to deposit, to
borrow, or talk over their business With our Officers. We solicit
your business on above principles. Let us prove our ability to
serve you.
MADISON. SO DAKOTA
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East River ISottCotl Oak and Mapte WoM
Sterling E£l k Scranfcm jlsid CSgfl
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Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.
Phone 2343 L. H. BLAGBN, AfUlt
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