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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, April 05, 1920, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1920-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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IL1
AUMMOM FOOD SUPPLY
MIR
L. 'I
is, April
k,' vv\
MAT
BE
CUT OFF.
Chicago, Aprtf American
Express company and the Milwaukee
railroad declared that freight and ex
press embargoes would result from
the Switchmen's strike.
Chicago, April 5.—Martial law may
be needed in Chicago's railroad yards
as the result of the strike of switch
men on 11 roads which is imperiling
the city's food supply and wrecking
railway passenger and freight sched
ules. The strikers claimed that 9,000
Mritehmen were out.
E
MBKNCH WIT, TOT OFTTTY COTES
IN RUHR DISTRICT
Paris, April
#.—Frcadh
of German cities in the Ruhr district
to guaranteed evacuation of German
troops which entered the neutral zone
in violation of the Versailles treaty,
will not be carried out before April
7,
It was learned today.
This decision was reached at a con
ference between Premier Millerand
and Marshall Foch. French leaders
decided that their troops would not
be sent into German cities garrisoned
by German troops nor into those dis
tricts of the Ruhr valley where Teu
ton troops already had penetrated in
their efforts to clear out the com
munist rebels.
France does not intend to risk pos
sible clashes between her troops and
Reichswehr. British representatives
explained to Millerand today that de
lay in Great Britain's reply to the
French communication notifying Bri
tain of France's decision to occupy
cities in the neutral zone was caused
by the fact that most members of
the London government were away
from their offices during the Easter
holidays.
At Mayence dispatch said Reichs
wehr troops had entered Hamburg,
Dortmound and Recklinghausen. The
troops were singing "Hoch Der Kais
er," it was reported.
5.—The
movement of
Oeftnan troops into the Ruhr district
continued today, the French foreign
office was advised. The foreign of
fice said that up to date 94,000 Teu
ton troops had entered neutral zones.
This force was estimated as compris
ing two-thirds of the forces General
Matter had concentrated to move
agaiaat tfto West Phalen eomxpun
ists.
West Baden, Germany, April 5.—
The German government has ordered
the Reichswehr troops to leave the
neutral zones, it is reported unoffi
cially here. Duisberg has already
been evacuated, the report stated.
Washington, April 5.—The United
States is expected soon to make an
inquiry or France as to her intentions
with regard to advancing farther lato
Germany.
o
Money to Settle
Federal Ry. Control
Washington. April S.—Additional
appropriations of $436,000,000 to
wind up federal control of railroads,
was asked of the house today by
Swagar Sherley, director of finance of
the railroad administration.
o
Burned to Death
By Gasoline
Brainerd, Minn., April 5.—Mrs.
Hulda Parsons,
48,
I
Sir
of Pillagers, was
burned to death and her daughter
suffered severe burns while cleaning
clothing with gasoline.
o,
Sues For
Big Heart Balm
Bioux Falls, April
6.—Balm
"broken heart"
for a
in the sum of
nnn i« hv Wlu Trtrn* T)nrn. trad
W w w A
5 and employed in a Sioux Falls de
partment store, from Ed. Muns, aged
$0, said to be wealthy, and a resident
of Cedar Rapids, la.
According to the complaint, Muns
was an ardent suitor for the girl's
hand and gave her an automobile val
ued at $1,200. She alleges that when
his ardor cooled, he brought a replev
in action for the return of the car.
She is still willing to fulfill her en
gagement to marry Muns, she asserts,
but he refuses.
Both the breach of promise and the
replevin suit are set for the May term
of circuit court here.
o
Presidential Prefer
ence In Michigan
Detroit, Mich., April 5.—Michigan
today was registering its presidential
preference at the polls in direct party
primary.
OSMLA,
qgeepattoa
I IRELAND
8INN FKINKRS ARRESTED—OUT
BREAKS WERE CAREFULLY
PLANNED.
April
5.—More thaa
500
Sinn Feiners have been arrested in
a new series of raids by the police
and military following the Easter up
rising, according to estimates at Dub
lin castle today. North of Ireland is
still under virtual martial law. North
ern Ireland is completely cut off from
all telegraphic communication. The
total number of police barracks
burned and bombed in the Easter up
rising throughout Ireland stood at 99
at 2 o'clock this afternoon. In Dub
lin the troops were confined Mn their
barracks. The officers hav# orders
to prepare for any eventuality. The
night passed quietly.
Reports today showed that the out
breaks everywhere were carefully
planned and directed by a central or
ganization. Fresh outbreaks were re
o
ELMf! PF*SKF FO»*!F DEAD
WITH BULLET WOUND IN
HER HEART.
Deadwood, April 5.—Miss ETste
Pinske was found dead with a jagged
bullet wound through her heart last
Thursday afternoon about 5:30
o'clock, by Janjes E. Russell, who
just returned from a business trip to
Omaha, when he went to his home on
Forest avenue, Deadwood.
Immediately after finding the body
Mr. Russell notified the authorities
of the death of Miss Pinske, who has
been wording for him and his father
as housekeeper since last August.
States Attorney Francis J. Parker,
County Coroner V. R. Hodges, Deputy
Sheriff Warren Owen, Dr. Alfred Ben
nett, noted criminologist from Den
ver, and Chief of Police McGinley
hurried to the scene of the shooting,
where they found the dead girl lying
in the bathroom shot through the
heart, her body lying in a pool of
blood.
Mr. Parker asked Mr. Bennett to
take charge of the case, which he
did. Immediately after taking charge,
the doctor, who is in Deadwood in
connection with the Searle case, ob
tained a print of a footmark, which
was evidently made by a woman,
from the snow on the stairs leading
up to the house from the street be
low.
A search was then made of the first
floor of the building. The following
death message was found by the of
ficials on the kitchen table:
"Dear Folks:
"I am just tired of living, .1 am
not satisfied in town and would like
to be at home but I thought when I
could be working it was best. I liked
it here while Anna (which is sup
posed to mean a sister of the dead
girl) was here but since she has been
gone nothing seems to be the same,
and it seems to me all my friends are
against me. They don't like me any
more here, but I will go to a different
place and perhaps I will be more sat
isfied.
"I like everybody, even to my ene
mies. I care for every one.
"Hope
nothing happens to you
folks Just because I thought Heaven
was better than living on earth.
"Remember, I am
thinking of
every one this last minute.
"Goodbye,
taisaed)
$75,-
w w
V
BILL IS
EX-SERVICE MEN'S CLAIMS WILL
BE TAKEN UP.
Washington, April
This would make the total expen
diture about $1,500,000,000." Repub
lican leaders are considering raising
this amount by a tax on all retail
sales. No other changes in the reve
nue law will be made at this session,
the majority of the house committee
decided today.
A special sub-committee probably
will be appointed to consider all the
soldier aid proposals, but it is not
thought a bill will be submitted be
fore the latter part of April.
0
CfDlTES IN
WOOD-L O ITD TS N-JOHNSON CON
TEST FEATURE OF CAM
PAIGN IIC MICHIGAN.
Detroit, Mich., April
6.—Final
The three other candidates on the
republican ticket, General Pershing,
Herbert Hoover and William G. Simp
eon of Detroit, made no active cam
paigns. Mr. Hoover's cause, how
ever, was taken up by a hurriedly as
sembled volunteer organization, after
he announced he wSuld accept the re
publican nomination if it were shown
to be desired by supporters of that
party.
The democrats have only one
active candidate in the field although
five were placed on the ballot. At
torney General Palmer, appealing for
support on the record of the demo
cratic national administration, made
a short campaign trip across the low
er peninsula. Four others/ William
J. Bryan, William G. McAdoo, Gov
ernor Edwards of New Jersey and
Mr. Hoover made successful efforts
to have their names withdrawn, im
mediately after they were filed with
the secretary of state.
o
Deserted Wiff
Is In Luck
Fremont, Neb., April 5.—Ten yfars
after Loren D. Whelpley deserted her
and their four children, taking with
him the proceeds of mortgages on
their home, Mrs. Laura Whelpley has
secured in district court judgment
against him for $8,706.50.
For nine years no word came from
Whelpley, and the widow struggled
at sewing to pay off the mortgages
and send her four daughters through
school. Last fall Whelpley's sister,
Mrs. Addie Beebe, died, and the first
news came from him when he cabled
from Honolulu his claim to the estate.
In the meantime his wife had secured
a divorce.
Of the judgment $5,000 is for the
support of the children since he left,
and the remainder is for the amount
of the mortgages with interest. The
judgments will be a lient upon the
Beebe estate.
Reitz Is Taken
To Leavenworth
Sioux Falls, April
5.—Edwin
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, MONDAY, APRIL 5, 1920
5.—Republican
members of the house ways and
means committee have decided to re
port favorably a soldier bonus bill at
tli is session, it was learned today.
Democrats on the committee are
opposing such action, claiming the
government cannot afford it at this
time.
No details of the bonus legislation
have been agreed on, but it is prob
able that the bonus will be less than
the smallest amount asked by any of
the soldier organizations. The small
est amount asked was $30 for each
month's service. A prominent repub
lican today said the bonus would be
920 a month or less.
ap­
peals by Governor Frank L. Lowden
of Illinois and Senator Hiram W.
Johnson, marked the close Saturday
of the campaign in Michigan's pres
idential preference primary today.
Governor Lowden closed at Saginaw,
while Senator Hiram Johnson wound
up his campaign at Muskegon.
The Lowden-Wood-Johnson contest
for the republican endorsement was
the outstanding feature of the cam
I paign. All three made at least two
trips through the state, while Sena
tor Poindexter, also a republican
asprant, made one brief tour.
Reitz,
Aberdeen merchant, bad? f&rewelj to
o/lC Vc.
itlftDison leader.
his family and left with Deputy Unit
ed States Marshal Bert Donahoe for
Leavenworth, where he will serve a
ear and a day in the federal prison.
Reitz, who was convicted in 1918
of violating the espionage act, sur
rendered to United States Marshal
William Hickey' Friday morning, two
days after the federal board of par
dons had refused him a pardon but
commuting his original sentence of
five years and a fine of $1,000 to Me
year and a day.
0—————
E
IVE
GREATER ADVANTAGES IN SIOUX
LLJWUA AS EDUCATIONAL
CENTER.
The proposition is being seriously
considered. It is suggested that the
present buildings at Vermillion could
be used for a state normal school or
some other institution.
o———•
Missing Heiress
Found Dead
Chicago, April
«.—JEWHW ©E
Diamond Shower
On Street
Minneapolis, AprtT 5.—"Hails of
bullets" are not infrequent. "Storms
of applause" often occur. And every
now and then there is a "flood of pro
test" or a "reign of terror."
But a shower of diamonds is some
thing else again and very infrequent.
However, that is what pedestrians
saw along Nicollet avenue, this city.
Mr. and Mrs. S. N. Wickersham of
New York city were returning to their
hotel. She was wearing a diamond
necklace of 100 stones valued at $25,
000. As she stepped from her mo
torcab a passing automobile struck
her and knocked her down. The
Btring of diamonds broke.
Led by the owner, pedestrians and
chauffeurs began a wild scramble in
the snow to regain the gems. All but
one was found. Fred Markham, a
cab driver found the hundredth gem
the next day. He returned it to Mrs.
Wickersham, and she
with a
$100
Cedar
school student,
moment
is on foot over the state to transfer
the University of South Dakota, now
located at Vermillion, to Sioux Falls.
It is proposed to bring this matter
up as soon as possible before a large
amount of proposed construction *3
started at the university.
It is understood that present condi
tions at the university demand about
five new buildings and the proposi
tion is to have the educational insti
tution transferred here before this
is undertaken.
The advantagel of Sioux Falls as
A, location for the state university in
preference to Vermillion are pointed
out as the chief reason for the
change. The new clinic building,
nearing completion, and hospitals
and other medisal facilities 'here
would materially assist the school of
medicine in its work, it is said. Sim
ilar conditions obtain in regard to the
college of law, engineering, etc., in
that greater opportunities are to be
found here for practical application
of knowledge gained in class-rooms
and elsewhere.
•There are several reasons given by
those who are fostering the proposi
tion, among which are: Greater op
portunity for students to make their
way through school better facilities
for taking care ol both professors and
the student body, the many classical,
musical, and other events of interest
offered in Sioux Falls the industrial
section of the city giving a chance foi
students to view at first hand the
operation and conduct of big busi
ness and factories the greater at
traction which a larger city has to
the majority of students as well as
instructors the location and railroad
facilities which this city would offer,
making transportation of students
from and to their homes much cheap
er and quicker.
15
years old, commit­
ted suicide here by shooting himself
through the temple with a revolver.
The following note was found on the
boy's body:
"I am killing myself because I am
too lazy to keep on living and take
the responsibility of life. I don't be
lieve 1* religion of any kind."
Digging Out
of Snow Storm
Chicago, April
6.—Midwest
Chicago, April
Mitchell, April
Kay,
the missing heiress, has been found.
The body of a young woman, taken
from Lake Michigan today by the po
lice, was identified as that of the
girl, whose disappearance caused a
national search by Gertrude Howe
Britton, Hull House serial worker.
o
JTFRESEUTED 'him
bill.
Lazy School Boy
Kills Self
Rapids, Iowa, April
e
K.
5.-
Blah ton. of this
w?.¥fh
states
are digging out of phenomenal snow
storms today. Floods are threaten-1
ing. More snow fell over central II
linois and northern Indiana on Easter
1
Sunday than has fallen all winter.:
Four feet of snow fell in Chicftfa.
Judge Quits Bench
Too Much Divorce
5.—Sick and tired
of hearing divorce cases, Judge
Joseph B. David of the superior court
here, resigned from that branch.
"Marriage doesn't mean anything
anymore," he said.
"A
divorce is no
longer a stigma on a woman's name.
It is an asset that seems to attract
more men."
Idle women and women seeking ex
citement were the' chief offenders in
ask*«« AivatecB. JuAqa JgNMnkt dwalar
ed.*-
Corn On Nebraska
Farms May Spoil
Lincoln, Neb., Aprfl
S.°—If
the rail-1
roads do not furnish cars immediate
ly much of last year's Nebraska corn
crop will spoil, according to represen
tations made by elevator interests and
farmers to the slate railway commis
sion.
Complaints filed with the commis
sion charge that station agents are
disregarding the rule of the inter
state commerce commission regulat
ing distribution of cars. Elevators
in some parts of the state, according
to the complaints, are full of grain
and cannot be emptied for lack of
cars. Farmers, it is declared, must
move their crop, or it will deteriorate
badly, as it contains considerable
M«4I!}T«U» and
is threatened with
Mitchell Votes
$125,000 Bonds
6.—At A
special!
bond issue election MiteheW citizens
approved, by a majority of more than
200, a bond issue of $125,000, which
will be used to lay additional water
mains and build storm sewers.
The passing of the bond issue
means that the contemplated $650,
000 paving program, outlined by the
city co'uncil can be carried out.
Had the bond iBsue been defeated
practically the entire program would
have been given up because of the
necessary underground work that
would have to be put in before the
paving could be laid.
Contractors who were awarded the
paving contracts have been notified
and are preparing to open the streets
tor the underground work prepara
tory to laying the paving.
Daily Market Report
Minneapolis
GUDN.
Minneapolis, April 5.—Corn: Mar
ket [email protected] higher, "with a good de
mand low moisture corn of good
shipping quality strongest. No. 3 yel
low closed at $1.63 @1.65 No. 3
mixed, $1.61 @1.63.
Oats: Demand good and prem
iums well maintained bulk of No. 3
whites at [email protected] over May, in cars
which could not be reloaded, 5c over.
No. 3 white closed at 92%@94%c
No. 4 white oats at 90% @92%c.
Rye: Market firm with good de
mand No. 2 at 3%c over for straight
and 1 per cent dockage, V4c better for
each 1 per cent of dockage. No. 2
rye closed at $1.85 @1.86%.
Barley: Market up [email protected] de
mand good and offerings moderate.
Prices closed at [email protected]
ADD FIUME
8km Olty liiwtetl.
Sioux City, April 5.—Some in
crease in quality and decrease in
weight caused the market to look
higher which also accounts for the
iact that the top of the bulk only ran
to $14.75 Saturday and went to $16
today. The bottom of the bulk land
ed around $13.50. The extreme close
found porkers dominating the trade
and prices were 25 to 60 cents lower
-vij
Sparkling Gem,
Bast River
Sterling Egg
You should be as quick as others in
learning the advantages of having a
bank account in a reliable bank whore
your
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEED
UNDER STATE LAW i
DAKOTA STATE BANKS?J
Madison, South Dakota
Farmers! Attention!
Scrap iron and rags art high. Bring your iron in and
get the highest prices. We also buy second-handed cars,
Hides, Furs and Junk of'all descriptions,
Northwestern Hide & JuM Co.
PHONE 2201 MADISON, S. a
OUR IDEA
Thrift
Is never o«t of data. The family that saves brings eontsat
ment
to its fireside.
As often as tenant te sswai seenrtttes Ike sasler
becomes to save. You want every dollar you invest to yield
YOU
and yoursr a substantial return and there is something al
Moat sacred about your savings.
i-H"
We know how you feel and we realise our resiMDhsiblllty
When we encourage hundreds to deposit in our Savings Dapftrt
Bent, and come to us for securities.
something well adapted to your needs.
THE TEST OF ALL
Hayes-Locas Lumber
Phone 234$
i |6
,I.S
i-
'. UC
$
£?&Kr
'k
=9*»
S
\4
'-3*
Service to oar castomers IMI
to the commanity to
do bnsinees.
We want our customers to feel at home, whether to deposit, to
borrow, or talk over their business with ou% Officers. Wo sollelt
your businoss oa «tMve principles*,*• Let us Mr «M|§ty to
serve you.
MADISON. SO DAKOTA
4V.-

We will be pleased to have you call at our office tad
secure
a little paper on Economic Conditions, Governmental
jpinance and U&ited States Securities, which Issaed each
Bionth.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS SIM,MM*
A -'V
I- H-B
'1*3

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