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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, May 28, 1920, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1920-05-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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KNOX PEACE RR8QU?.
iiM£D BY THE HOUSE
Wa lington, May 28.— The Sena
tor Knox peace resolution was killed
today by the house which failed by
twenty-eight votes to override Presi
dent Wilson's evto of the measure.
I ARMERS' XATIOWAIi COL WOT,
ADDRESSES LF7TTBR TO
POIJTICAL PARTIES
Washington, May 28.—Govern
ment ownership of the railroads and
merchant marine was demanded to
day by the Farmers' National Council
in a letter addressed to the demo
crats and republican committees anil
signed by George P. Sampton, direc
tor of the Council. Other planks the
farmers demand are legislation to
control packers, taxes on lands and
other natural resources held for spec
ulation, adequate and cheap credit
for farmers and protection of farm
ers' co-operative societies from prose
tion under anti-trust laws.
RAILROAD MANAGEMENT
CRITICISED
Washington, May 28.—The na
tion's railroads must go back under
government control unless private
managers begin to operate efficient
ly and without calling on the govern
ment for financial assistance, Daniel
C. Roper, big corporation head, warn
ed today. Business men will demand
lesumption of government control
unless service is bettered quickly,
Raid Roper. Private management now
seems to be costing the public mil
lions under the guarantee clWM of
the transportation act.
SMALL NEWSPAPERS
ABE ASSISTED
CHICAGO PUBLISHER RELEASES
lOO TONS OF NEWS PRINT FOR
THEIR IMMEDIATE USE
Chicago, May 28."—Victor F. Law
son, publisher of the Chicago Daily
News, has released 100 tons of new
print to be distributed to smaller
newspapers which are in need of sup
plies and are reported to face sus
pension if immediate assistance is not
given them, it was announced today.
A number of newspapers through
out the country are without mill con
nections, according to J. L. Fearing,
western manager of the International
Paper company, who said that the
action of Mr. Lawson and other large
publishers in releasing part of their
tonnage at the request of the Inter
national Paper company, George H.
Mead company and other concerns
had saved the lives of many papers.
Mr. Fearing, who asked Mr. Law
•on to
release the tonnage, s^id he
found him anxious to co-operate in
the plan for newspaper relief. At
Mr. Lawson's request the paper will
be distributed by Mr. Fearing, who
said this action, and that of otheT
large publishers, had ^lready had a
softening effect upon the "spot" mar
ket, and that there were indications
of an early adjustment of the news
print situtation.
Mr. Fearing stated that so far as
possible the distribution of the paper
would be effected through the com
mittee on newsprint supply with
which the Inland Daily Press associa
tion is affiliated through Willard E.
Carpenter, of the Lincoln, III., Cour-
ier-Herald, chairman of the executive
newsprint committee A. W. Peter
son, of the Waterloo, la., Courier
W. D. Lindsay, of the Marion, Ind.,
Chronicle E. P. Alder, of the Daven
port, la.. Times, and Roscoe Chap
man. of the Rockford. 111., Star.
-o-
MOl'TH DAKOTA TltA(EDY NEAR!
IARKI:R EARI.Y TODAY
Parker, May 28.——fclverett L«uus,
32, formerly an inmate of the hos
pital for insane.. killed his father and
mother with an axe at their farm ten
miles northwest of here early today.
Young Loos became, angry when hi
father asked him to finish planting
a field of corn.
HITS 10
I
INEFFICIENCY OF PRIVATE
ALLEGES BIG PROFITS IN SALES
OF OLOT1I—EXCEED 900 TL
4M PER CENT
New York, May 28.—The Ameri
can Woolen company, of New York,
the American Woolen company, of
Massachusetts, and Win. M. Wood,
president of both companies, were
charged with profiteering in woolen
cloth in an indictment returned here
by the federal grand jury.
The indictment contains fourteen
counts, charging fourteen individual
violations of the Lever act in the sale
of cloth at unjust and unreasonable
prices.
The first count in the indictment
charged the company with the sale
on January 7, 1920, of 79 yards of
cloth, which cost $2.25 a yard, tor
$3.67% a yard. Another count al
leges that a piece of cloth which cost
$1.62 a yard was sold on January 12,
1920 for $3.25 a yard. Other counts
charge similar transactions.
It developed. Assistant District At
torney H. A. Smyth said, that the
company was receiving 3 5 per cent
profit above cost, although Mr. Wood
claimed the profit proposed by th'
company for its 1920 business was
12% per cent. The amount of pro
fits which the company was realizing,
he said, exceeded "on .the average
from 300 to 4®0 per cent those of
1919."
Mr. Wood, in a staJement made In
Boston, April 28, declared:
"There is absolutely no just
ground for the suggestion that this
company has charged excessive prices
for its cloth, or has gained an unrea
sonable or excessive prifit."
The American Woolen company.
Mr. Smyth said, is the largest manu
facturer of woolen cloth in the United
States and to a large extent domin
ates the trade.
"The department, therefore, feels
that it has unearthed one of the most
important cases of profiteering
known since the amendment to the
Lever act went into effect," he said.
The Investigation disclosed "a
most astounding condition of affairs
with regard to these companies and
their president," he added.
The cost-plus system of fixing
prices apparently was adopted by the
company for the first time this year,
according to Mr. Smyth. Profits in
creased on an average of 300 per
cent as a result, he asserted. In view
of this increase, Mr. Smyth said, and,
"notwithstanding that the manufac
turing and selling companies are sub
jected to an expense on account of
the same man beijig president of both
companies, of nearly $1,000,000 com
pensation for commissions and sal
aries, the 1920 statement should
prove a most interesting docume.it
If the companies are permitted to
carry on this campaign of profiteer
ing which they so boldly started out
to inaugurate at the beginning of
this year."
Charles Evans Hughes has been re
tained as counsel for the defendants.
To Investigate
I. W. W. Activities
FORTHIIfE HIGH
IXTKKISTIMJ EXERCISES
OM.MI:\CI:MI:\T—I:\CEL-
liEVT ADDRESS BY IIAB-
1H STERNHEIM
i' trents of the graduates who re
c« unl their diplomas at the central
building last night and friends of
education to the number of several
hundred filled the high school audi
torium to witness the commencement
c.ercisos beginning at eight o'clock.
Following the opening piano num
ber by Miss Lila Palmer and the high
school chorus those present sat under
the magnetic personality of Rabbi
Sternheim who delivered an address
of unusual merit, on the subject of
ideals. The speaker launched out on
Americanism, drawing comparisons
of the conditions and times socially,
educationally and industrially as they
were ten years ago and as they are
at present. He remarked that before
the war predatory, business exploited
everything and everybody in reach.
He maintained that conditions ara
changed now—changed for the bene
fit of all and especially for the uplift
of humanity. Business today is con
ducted on a legitimate profit basis.
Directing his attention to the large
graduating class the speaker sought
to woo them to high ideals—to
careers that meant helpfulness to the
race. His compelling argument was
that the wealth of the nation rest 1
upon the students and graduates of
our institutions of learning much
more than upon our financial ratings
and bursting treasury vaults. The
climax of the address, ir 'ave terms,
touched on the niorallt -oblem us
a true foundation to racy. H^
drew in strong contrast nominal
pay of hard working teachers and the
highly paid specialist in other pro
fessions, expressing his sympathy for
the former. The entire address was
the product of clear thinking and
sound judgment. Rabbi Sternheim
left an impress for good upon the
class and auditors alike.
After a sbng number by the high
school chorus Miss Alice Montgom
ery, principal of the high school and
intimate friend of each graduate, pre
sented the class to the board of edu
cation, who. through their president,
George It. Farmer, gave each mem
ber the official credential that certi
fied to th* work done and the credits
merited through four years of indi
vidual painstaking work.
In this connection it might be add
ed that at 9 o'clock a. m. today the
splendidly edited and illustrated high
school annuals were distributed to
the seniors and their most intimate
friends. The editorial and advertis
ing staff of the particular publica
tion are to be congratulated upon the
success they have achieved in put
ting out in such neat form a complete
history of the class, and its various
athletic and social phases.
SITE PISSES LAST
OF SUPPLY BILLS
SUNDRY CIVIL APPROPRIATION
ACT CARRIES $440,000,000.
Washington, D. C., May 28.—The
$440,000,000 sundry civil appropria
tion bill, the last of the regular an
nual government supply bills, was
passed by the senate today and sent
to conference.
The bill as passed carried ao
amendment giving congress authority
to determine what government publi
cations shall be published, but au
thorizing those now being issued to
be continued until June 30, 1921.
Except that power to control govern
ment publication is vested in con
grees instead of in the joint congres
sional printing committee, the
amendment is similar to the one
which resulted in the president re
cently vetoing the legislative appro
priation bill.
The senate also adopted without
debate an amendment appropriating
$1,500,000 for the use of the bureau
of internal revenue in guarding in
toxicating liquoite held in warehouses
and for enforcing the national prohi
bition act. Another amendment to
pay the railroad fare home from
Washington of war workers who re
sign or are dismissed from service
#t. Paul, Way .—Ctevernor Burn- between now and July 1 next.
quist sent Major Garrison af the na- Other legislative riders added by
tional guard to Bemidji to invest!- the senate included authority to ex
gate, following a plea by Attorney tend use of the $300,000,000 revolv
Ravin, of the Shevlin-Carpenter lum- ing fund of the interstate commerce
ber interests, that their property wa£! commission from five to fifteen years,
endangered by I. W. W, activittai. The commission now is arranging for
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, MAY 28, 1920
AT
•long term loans from this fund to
the railroads to be used in obtaining
more cars.
The septate accepted an amendment
by Senator Robinson, democrat, of
Arkansas, appropriating $22,500 for
•ontinuance of the federal employ
ment service. Of that amount the
amendment provides that $25,000
shall be used for the mobilization of
workers to harvest the wheat crop
in various parts of the country.
o
IF MILLION
"ANGEI/' OF 1TOOD CAMPAIGN
ON WITNESS STAND—NAMES
OTHER COXTRIIU'"TORS
Washington, D. C., May 28.—Col.
William Cooper Proctor, Cincinnati
manufacturer, who has been describ
ed as "the angel" of Maj. Gen. Leon
ard's Wood's Ohio campaign, testi
fied at the senate investigation of
pre-convention political financing
that he had advanced $500,000 to
Wood's national organization. He es
timated that contributions from all
other sources would not make as
much.
The committee of inquiry also
went into the expenditures of three
other candidates during the day.
Former Representative C. C. Carlin,
of Virgina, manager of Attorney Gen
eral Palmer's national organization,
testified that its cash expenditures
had been $59,610. James W. Gerard,
former ambassador to Germany, has
spent $14,000—all his own money
as a presidential candidate, acocrding
to his manager, S. T. Jones, of Den
Moines, la., while Representatives
Louis Crampton, of Michigan, said
about $13,000 had been spent in his
state for Senator Johnson, republi
can, California, this total not being
included in the Johnson national
compaign account previously fixed ar
$63,138.
Mr. Carlin
was
questioned more
extensively about alleged underpay
ments of incofhe tax by the Crucible
Steel company, and Mr. Dupuy, form
er chairman of the board of directors
of that company, than he was con
cerning campaign expenditures. He
told the committee that the largest
contributor to Mr. Palmer's campaign
was Mr. J. Guffey, who gave $10,^00,
and who was identified as a prom
inent oil man.
The name became confused with
that of Col. James McClurg Guffey,
former democratic national commit
teeman from Pennsylvania, and Afr.
Carlin said afterwards that Col. Guf
fey was the man he had in mind. It
developed, subsequently, however,
that the contributor was Joseph F.
Guffey, of Pittsburg, also an oil man,
and a former democratic national
commiteeman from Pennsylvania.
Col. Proctor testified that besides
advancing $500,000 to Gen. Wood's
campaign fund he had made a con
tribution of $10,000. He objected to
naming other contributors, saying
that the men charged with handling
the campaign finances would gi\e
names and exact amounts. Urged
by members of the committee, how
ever. he said that Ambrose Monel
had given $20,000, and that William
Wrigley, a fellow like me" and
"Mr. Byllesby, New York banker,"
had been large contributors.
The witness said that his own ad
vance of money to the general's cam
paign had been "as idealistic as giv
ing to the Red Cross during the war,"
and added that he "intended to ad
vance as much more as he felt would
be proper."
To Undermine
the Constitution
New
York, May
LIQUOR SLEUTH
WAS IN SP
ALL1.
small
minority of the population conceal
ing their design under the word
'labor' are threatening to undermine
the constitution," Elbert S. Gary,
president, of Iron and Steel Institute,
declared in addressing the anna.t
meeting here today. These men, he
said, have already secured some leg
is lation which is wrongfully discrim
inating.
Resolutions Express
Sympathy for Ireland
Washington, May 28.—Resolu
tions expressing sympathy of the
public with the aspiration of Irish
people, for a government of their
own choice, was favorably reported
by the foreign affairs committee to
dty by a vote of eleven to seven.
The plans are to ask action on resolu
tion In the house next week.
IN PIT
ErTING RASI
:MI:NT OF
il l) MOON Sill
I S
ROME
Mitchell. May 28.—Wood Smith,
Mitchell, deputy state sheriff, nar
iwly escaped falling into a 15-foOt
^.t in the basement of the home of
Henry Heints, a resident of Arta«,
Campbell county, who was accused
of having a supply of liquor.
No legitimate reason could be giv
en for the presence of the pit in the
cellar. It was located in a dark cor
ner of the basement behind the fur
nace, and had a layer of broken bot
tles on the bottom.
Mr. Smith was searching In the
basement of the Heintz home for con
cealed liquor. Mr. Heintz was Willi
him and gave him no warning con
cerning the pit in the corner of the
basement.
When asked to explain the pres
ence of the pit there, all he said was:
"Oh, I started to dig a well there
once."
Mr. Heinta was arrested cm the
charge of having a quantity of in
toxicating liquor in a pool hall of
which he is proprietor, and was re
leased for trial later under bonds of
$1,000.
William Slegler, Herreld, was
placed under arrest and had bonds
placed at $1,000, on a charge of sell
ing intoxicating liquor and operating
a gambling house.
n
Bolshevists and
the British
Londonn, May 28.—Gregory Kras
sine, Bolshevist commissioner, here
today admitted he would endeavor
to reach an understanding with the
British government on the resump
tion of trade with soviet
Russia.
o—
Big Fine for
Profiteering
Syracuse, N. Y., May 28.—Weeds,
incorporated, of Binghampton, was
found guilty of profiteering in viola
tion of the Lever act today and fined
$31,000 by Judge Manton In federal
court. Excess charges Ml clothing
sales weif charged.
—o
Presbyterians Quit
Inter-Church Work
Philadelphia, May 28.—The Pres*
byterian church today has severed
its connection with the Inter-Church
World Movement. Legal difficulties
were given as the cause.
Battle Between
Strikers and Guards
Water Power Bill
Passed After Big Fight
WabhiUelon, May 28. Ending a
twelve-year the senate today passed
the water power bill as it came Hi*'
conference. The house having agreed
on measure it now goes to President
Wilson for signature.
Daily Market Report
Minneapolis (jiruin
Minneapolis, May 28.—Corn. Mar
ket higher offerings light and de
mand good. No. 3 yellow closed at
$1.84 @1.85 No. 3 mixed at $1.83^/
1.84.
Oats. Buyers reduced bids and
premiums ruled easy. No. 3 whites
17(?/18c over July. No. 3 whites
closed at $1.03*4 @1.04%: No. 4
whites at 98 $1.2 V4
Rye. Unchanged, demand good
No. 2 at 12 13c over July. No. 2
rye closed at $2.03 2.04 %.
aBrley. Market [email protected] higher de
mand good, offerings small. Price
closed at $1.25 @1.62.
Sioux City, May, 28.—Tops were
boosted up to $14.35, which is 20c
over what the crest has been for the
last three days. The bulk of the
sales ran from $13.50 @14.25 and
the long strings generally landed
within a $13.75 @14.00 spread.
Is never out of data,
inent to its fireside.
You should be as quick as others ia
learning the advantages of having &
bank account in a reliable bank where
your
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEED
UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK
Madison, South Dakota
OUR IDEA
The family that saves brings co^taat-
As often aa you invest in sound securities the easier it
becomes to save. You want every dollar you invest to yield
you and yours a substantial return and there is something al
most sacred about your savings.
We know how you fael and we realise our responsibility
When we encourage hundreds to deposit in our Savings Depart
ment, and come to us for securities. We can always suggest
something well adapted to your needs.
We will be pleased to have you call at aar office and
secure a little paper on Economic Conditions, Governmental
Finance and United States Securities, which is Issued each
month.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Bristol, R. I., May 28.—Three men
were shot and a score were injured
when strikers and guards at. the Na
tional India Rubber plant engaged
in a pitched battle when Governor
Beekman ordered out the troops..1—
The battle was preciptated when wo ||llll||lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll(.1lg
men attacked a girl clerk.
o
CAPITAL AND SUKl'LUS 1100,000^0
The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
1 Makers of High Grade Butter
5 Manufacturers of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
PHONE 2341 MADISON, & D.
tiliiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiimimiiHiwiiHiiiBimwiiwinnMUiiimg
I W. KETCHAM & SON
COAL
Kentucky Lump
Splint Lump
Large and Sni&H Briquets
PHONH
fcflMrt-
Service to oar customers and
to the community In which wa
do business.
We want our customers to feel at home, whether to deposit, to
borrow, or talk over their business with our Officers. We solicit
your business on above principles. Let us prove our ability to
serve you.
MADISON. SO DAKOTA
Old Fashioned
ihtrtnti -•ftfliiiiH-'ii
Egg Hard
Coke

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