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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 14, 1920, Image 1

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GREATEST PLURALITY
IN ITS HISTORY
MAINE GOKS Itl ri BIJCAN BY A
PM'KALITY OF
70,000
Alfusta, Maifte,' S^pt 14,—The
state of Maine went republican in its
state election yesterday by the great
est plurality in its history. Tilt' lat
est returns showed republican plur
ality will be nearly 70,000.
Chicago, Sept. 14.—Control of the
republican party in Illinois will be
the chief issue of that party in the
state primary election to be held to
morrow. William Hale Thomp
son, mayor of Chicago, and his fol
lowers are fighting the faction
headed by Gov. Frank O. Lowden
for the domination of the state
republican ticket.
New York, Sept. 14.Regularity
versus insurgency was the main is
sue in%the New York state primary
today with odds apparently heavy
in favor of regularity. Both local
and national republican leaders ex
pressed confidence in the nomination
of James W. Wadsworth, Jr., to suc
ceed himself as candidate for Unit
ed States senator over George Henry
Payne and Mrs. Ella A. Bool.
NATION OWKS IT TO PACIFIC
COAST TO STAND BEHIND
THEM
Ohio, Sept. 14 .—Declar­
ing his belief that racial questions
on the Pacific coast have created a
friction that must be recognized
Senator Harding in his speech to the
California delegation here today as
serted the nation owes it to the Pa
cific coast states to stand behind
them in the necessary measures con
sistent with our national honor to
relieve them of their difficulties.
Senator Harding's gpeech was deliv
ered in response to an address by
Governor Stephens of California who
headed the d«legattM Jlbm the
western coast.
Huntington, Oregon, Sept. 14.—
Governor Cox today was completing
his stump invasion ot far north
west confident that .during the last
week he has made big inroads on
the republican stmngholds. The re
sult is already befng felt at Marion,
Governor Cox said today. He also
expressed himself as expecting an
announcement any time that Sena
tor Harding la to follow in bis foot
steps.
——————-o-«
All. DOl'BT OF VALIDITY OF
AMENDMENT IS NOW
BSMOVflfr
r—-
Hertford, Conn., Sept. 14.—The
Connecticut legislafure this after
noon ratified the federal suffrage
amendment by a vote in the house of
216 for and 11 against and in the
senate by 33 for and none against.
Washington, Sept. 14.—Connecti
cut's ratification of the federal wo
man suffrage amendment removes
all doubt as to the amendments val
idity as well as possibility of fall
election being carried through courts
into house of representatives be
cause of Tennessee'^ radiating ac
tion.
S Lone Gunman Holds
i jUp Aberdeen Man
Aberdeen, Sept. 11.—11At
(he
point
of a 32-caliber autonf&tic pistol.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Weber were
held up at their home, In this city
by a lone "stick up" man. The
holdup occurred about 9:30 In the
evening.
About $3 in chance Vt» taken
fcpjn Mr. Weber.
According to Mrs. Weber, theijnan
Mrs. Weber called h$r i.usbnd
who was Ip an adjoining room. The
man took what money Weber haft
and backed away.
The police were'immediately fitf
tlfied. A search of the neighbor
hood was made, but the intruder
Was not found..
E
Pierre, Sept. 14.—Under the pro
visions of tht* Richards primary law,
the candidate for governor, who re
ceived* the seeoml highest number
of votes at an election is required to
challenge the candidate of the party
casting the highest number of votes,
to 12 joint debates, the challenge to
be made not later than the first of
September, and an acceptance must
be filed not later than the 10th of
September. W. W. Howes, the
democratic candidate issued his
challenge to be made not later than
tlie first of September, and an ac
ceptance must be filed not later than
the 10th of September. W. W.
Howes, the democratic candidate is
sued his challenge to W. H. McMas
ters, which challenge has been ac
cepted. Under the law in case fail
ure on the one part to challenge or
the other to accept the name of the
candidate failing is not to be cer
tified to the voters, but under the
general law the certificates went out
before either date. The challenged
party has the right to name places
and dates of the debates, and Mr.
McMaster has fixed dates, Tyndall,
September 20 Armour, September
22 Oliver, September 23 Plankin
ton, September 24 Chamberlain,
September 25 Oacoma, September
27 Gann Valley September 28
Woonsocket, September 29 Miller,
September 30 Faulkton, October 1
Highmore, October 2.
Huge-Sturgeon Runs
Away With Boat
Pierre* Sept. 14.—To have his
boat stolen by a fish is the story told
by F. Caldwell, an old fisherman,
who lives on the Missouri, river
front.
His story is that while fishing up
near the Poria Bottom location, he
caught a 49-pound sturgeon, and
tied his catch to the side of the
boat.
Later he caught a large catfish,
and while landing his second catch,
with the oars lying in the bottom
of the boat, the big sturgeon got in-1
Jo action, and Caldwell found him
fcelf floundering in the water as the
boat half turned over, and then
straightened out and started rapidly
down stream.
Caldwell says he is getting too
old to try to outswim a fish and so
he watched the fast disappearing
4oat.
His partner, who was fishing some
distance down the river, saw the
"boat flying along through the wa
ter and investigated, with the result
that the big sturgeon was again
captured and put out of commission
for any further boat-stealing opera-
Urges Revolu- v
tionary Outbreak
Rome, Sept. 14.—The executives
of the third International labor coun
cil have issued a manifesto to the
Italian laborites and socialists urg
ing them to turn the preent econ
omic demonstration into a revolu
tionary outbreak, according to dis
patches from Berne. A battleship
loaded with troops has been ordered
to Genoa by the Italian government.
Bolshevik Launches
New Offensive

London, Sept. 14.—-The Bolshevikl
have launched ft new offensive
against the Polish and Ukranian
forces on both sides of Brody accord
ing to official dispatches from Mos^
cow this morning. Russian cavalry
is advancing rapidly on both sides
"TI v -V
of LembMt
a-
4
§he itlattson
•*imm
stepped upon the front porch and
rapped at the door. She went to
tiie door where she was asked to
"hand over all the money in the
house."
JOINT DEBUTE
SOUTH DAKOTA CANDIDATES
FOR GOVERNOR TO
ABERDEEN SIRL AT
SITE INQUIRY
TELLS HOW (jlRL INTERNAL
KEYEM'E EMPI/OYES WERE
ASKED TO GIVE MONEY
Chicago, Sept. 14.—How girl «m
ployes of the internal revenue office
at Aberdeen, S. D., were solicited to
contribute to a democratic campaign
fund was described today to the sen
ate committee* investigating cam
paign expenses by Miss Eunice Coyne
a reporter of the Aberdeen Dail^
News. She said the girls were ask»
ed for $40 each by E. M. Waterbury
of Centerville, S. D., who came to
Aberdeen and described himself as
an agent of Charles Mee, father of
J. Walter Mee, revenue collector at
Aberdeen. Miss Coyne said the girlt
were also told that Clarence Mee
was clfeirman of a state-wide organ
ization engaged in collecting demo
cratic funds.
According to Miss Coyne the first
information on the occurrence came
through a letter received by Miss
Marion Armantrout, a stenographer,
which said that "office holders"
were being asked to assist the demo
cratic treasury. She identified a
published copy of this letter but
said the original was refused her by
Miss Armantrout's mother.
The witness named Lida Young,
Marion Kennedy, Sigrid Holland,
Jessie Burchard, Grace Curtis, *Ruth
Kelly and Dorothy Smith as other
civil serviec employes of the revenue
office who had received letters. It
then developed that the envelopes
had been addressed merely city and
that the missives had been delivered
at the girls' homes.
"There was one cent due on
each," added Miss Coyne.
"What!" exclaimed Sena Ken
von. "Did they even ask the girls
to pay postage on the letters?" and
he and Senators Reed and Pomerene
agreed that the episode was "despic
able and inexcusable."
The testimony indicated that the
letters named no definite assess
ment but that the young women
were each asked for $40 when they
called on Waterbury in response to
the letters. Several signed checks
for the amount but others gave post
dated checks on a partial payment
plan. The salaries of the girls were
fixed at about $120 a month each.
Miss Jessie Burchard, one of those
who gave $40, described the trans
action, however, as a purely "volun
tary" offering.
Miss Burchard said the letters re
quested the girls to call on Mr. Wa
terbury at a room in an Aberdeen
hotel and that about a dozen of
them went there together. Six of
the dozen, she said, gave $40 each
at that time.
Miss Burchard, whose home is in
Minneapolis, denied she had been
advised by counsel not to answer
the committee's summons as report
ed to Senator Kenvon yesterday.
Chief of Police Walker of Minnea
polis, sent a'patrolman to advise her
to come to Chicago, sh« said.
o
Announces Candidacy
for Senator
Bridgeport, Cenn., Sept. 11-—
Homer S. Cummings, former demo
cratic national chairman today an
nounced he will not be a candidte
for senator to oppose Senator
Frank Brandegee, republican nom
inee. He gave ppor health a
ness as his reasons.
Ml busi­
O
Sioux City Man
Drowns Self
Watertown, Sept. 14.—The body
of a man found drowned in Round
Lake, near South Shore, has been
identified as that of Daniel H. Her
bach, whose home is believed to
have been at Sioux City, la.
Evidences pointed so plainly to
suicide that it was deemed unneces
sary for the county corner to inves
tigate the drowning. He eveidently
took his own life by wading out into
the lake up to a point where it was
waist-deep and holding his head
under the water. Little is known of
him here or at South Shore. He was
,£bout 50 years of age.
In his pockets were found $13 in
icash and certificates of deposit
Bhowing he had money tl the Sioux
City bank.
Arju of Steam Shovel
fVrecks Depot
Watertown, Sept. 14.—The plat
form was torn away and a portion
W the Great Northern railroad sta-
i
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14,1920.
tion wrecked at South Shore by the
arm of the stean^ shovel of a work
train engaged in»excavating gravel
near that town.
Owing to the wires being broken
when the depot was wrecked, few
details about the accident could be
learned at the local Great Northern
office.
The arm of the shovel dropped out
of place as the train was going by
the depot. It caught on the plat
form and tore it out, taking part of
the station with It. No one was in
jured.
TO
AMERICAN STAB FUND IN STATE
18 CLIMBING FAST THROUGH
POPPY DAYS IN TOWNS
Sioux Falls, Sept. 14.—South Da
kota appears to be giving generous
ly to the fund raised by the Ameri
can-French Children's relief, known
as the American Star. According to
reports just received by Mrs. T. J.
White of Sioux Falls, the state chair
man, the total that has been raised
in the state outside of Sioux Falls,
has come through a series of Poppy
Days conducted In the various
towns where the women generously
gave their time to aid the little chil
dren of the devastated regions of
France.
The latest towns to report and
the amounts raised on their Poppy
Days are Brookings $306.66 Win
fred, $130 Hudson, $90.68 Dead
wood, $107.37 Kimball, $72.17
Alexandria $227.55 Ft. Pierre
$90.60 Rapid City $127.80 Dell
Rapids. $100.44 Henry $72.27 Vol
ga $96.90 Arlington $91.43 De
Smet $43.92 Iroquois, $37.76
Langford, $100.71 Pierpont, $35,-t
36 Lake Preston, $38.50 Groton.
$160.59. There axe other towns yet:
to report.
MMf COME TO
SENATOR HARD1N» WILL START
ON WESTERN TOUR THIS
MONTH
Sioux Falls, Sett 14. Senator
Warren Gamaliel Harding, republi
can nominee for the presidency, will
probably speak in South Dakota
early next month. This will make
the fourth presidential candidate in
the present campaign as Christen
sen, the third party man, was here
in August, Governor Cox comes Sep
tember 28 and Watson, the prohibi
tion candidate is expected the latter
part of this month.
Information concerning Senator
Harding's South Dakota tour is not
now available. National Commit
teeman Willis C. Cook is out of the
city and could not be reached. Early
this week Mr. Cook stated that plans
for a visit of Senator Harding had
been discussed but were purely ten
tative but today's Associated Press
dispatches clearly indicate that South
Dakota would be included in the
proposed itinerary which takes in
all states where United Senators are
to be elected.
Steps have already been taken to
insure in Sioux Falls the appearance
of Senator Harding. Some time ago
the chamber of commerce through
W. Z Sharp, its president, extended
a special invitation to the campaign
committee in charge of Senator
Harding's itinerary for him to visit
Sioux Falls if it was decided for
him to make a western tour.
In addition, it is expected that
Senator Harding will make four or
five speeches in the east late in Oc
tober. The western trip would start
during the last week in September
and probably would include address
es at Indianapolis, Chicago, Louis
ville, St. Louis, Omaha, Boise City,
Butte, Spokane, Seattle, Portland,
San Francisco. Los Angeles, Salt
Lake City, Denver, Oklahoma City
and a number of other citiee.
"j't
Shut Feiners to
.Cany Out Rrepr|s»Js
London, Sept. 14.—The Sinn Fein
government prefers carrying out Its
own reprisals for the expected death
of Lord Mayor MacSwiney rather
than Intrust them to Individuals it
was stated tt«day«?
T«~
E
COST OF UK
SUMMARY SHOWS AN ADVAWCB
OK 14)4. S PER CENT END-
lira
jvly i last
New York, Sept. 14.—Report* of
a survey of the cost of living con-'
trasted with living costs of pre-war
times made public by the National In-1
dustrial conference shows that the i
increase in the six-year period end-1
ing July 1 has been 104.5 per oeni.
The summary shows an increase of
19 per cent in the last year.
The survey shows that food in
creased 119 per cent in the six-year)
period, shelter, 58 per cent cloth
ing 166 per cent fuel, heat and
light 66 per ceht and sundries 85 per
cent.
These percentages were derived
from figures obtained from retail
dealers in large citiee.
Sugar climbed, 382 per cent po
tatoes, 368 per cent flour, 164 per
cent corn meal, 133 per cent rice,
114 per cent bread. 1U per cent
ham, 112 per cent lambs, 109 per
cent and pork chops 101 per cent.
Detroit showed an increase in food
prices of 138 per cent, the highest
of the thirty-nine cities In which fi
gures were collected, while Los An
geles was lowest with 95 per cent.
Figures Supplied by 361 real es
tate boards and civic organiations in
virtually all cities more than 50,000
gave a rent increase p4rect»ntage of
58 per cent.
Car fares increased In 120 cities
and remained unchanged in 33. Hard
coal prices increased 81.4 to 85.5
per cent soft coal. 103.1 pef cent
and gas and electricity for domestic
use 15 per cent.
Farmer Killed
By Tractor
Monroe, Sept. 14.—Tony Byl, a
farmer living a mile and a half west
of Monroe was killed by his tractor.
Byl's death probably was one of the
strangest that has ever occurred in
this part of the state.
The crank shaft on this particular
make of tractor is placed high on
the car. It is believed that the mo
tor back fired as Byl was cranking
it and that the handle of the crank
struck him on the head.
Mrs. Byl anxious because her hus
band had not returned, went to look
for him. She found his body lying
in front of the tractor,, the skull
crushed and one arm broken. Tfce
tractor had not been moved.
o—
Daily Market Report
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis. Sept. 14. Corn:
Easy
to 1 cent lower deand quiet,
offerings moderate. No. 3 yellow
closed at $1.37 $1.37 No. 3 mix-i
ed at $1.33 $1.34.
Oats: Demand good and difer
ences unchanged No. 3 whites 1
1 cents under December. No. 3
whites closed at 59% 6014 cents.
No. 4 whites at 55% cents,
Rye: Steady eary, premiums de-.
clining 3 cents later. No, 2 sold
mainly at 7 9 cents over Septem-
t'coDcr.
i
ber against 10 11 cents over at
close Saturday. No. 2 rye closed at
$1.93 Ms & $1.94%."
Barley: Bulk of sales unchang-j
ed, with choice higher and feed
sorts easy outside demand fair.
Prices closed at 83 cents &
Slonx City Livestock.
Sioux City, Sept. 14.—With top
hogs at $16.59, the bulk of the sales
ran from $15.00 to $16.30.
Col. C. S. PRICE
AUCTIONEER
NO SALE TOO LARGB, TOO S||AI^
OB TOO FAB AWAY
Telephone or see me at
HOIDAL'S OABAGB
Jelephone 2170 Madison. S. P-
CHIROPRACTOR.
MATHILDA HOGE, D. C. Ph. O.
Office at Res., 416, 1st St. N. W.
3% Blocks West of Lyric Theatre.
Hours: 2 to 5 P. M. or by appoint
ments.
Phone 2251.
MB. AND IO&
A. «. HALLENBECK
Undertaken
PHONBS: H—t»H»: Qglee l»tl
AUTO HllAHfflB flBBTIGB
Over Geo. B«k*s
Get Workman'!
^Compensation
'INSURANCE
E. SHERIDAN ft SON
RIAL
THE: c3LOE£,r
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PHONE 2341
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You should be as quick as others in
learning the advantages of having a
bank account in a reliable bank where
your
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEED^
UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK 5
Madison, South Dakots
SECURITY STATE BANK
Madison, S. D.
We pay 5 per cent on Time Certificates of Depoaltt^
Deposits Guaranteed by State Guaranty Fund.
Officers
C. A. •TENSLAND. President W. O. GIENAPP, Viae Preeldeat
G. L. SCULLY, Cashier.
MADISON. SO DAKOTA
,A
5 per cent
r-ir
From this date we
Jerest
rill pay 5 per cent in
on certificates
of Deposit for One
MADISON
a n k A V
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The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
'Makers of High Grade Butter*?
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Peerlesslce Cream and Soft
HigV»»ttt JPricc Paid for Cream
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