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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 15, 1920, Image 1

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ORGANIZATION' CANDIDATES IN
•BOTH PARTIES WIN'AT
THK POLLS
AIM^r, Il5.—The republican
and democratic organization candi
dates swept New York state in tin
primary elections yesterday, virtual
complete returns indicated today.
Kisnrgents in both the democratic
and republican ranks were defeated-
Chicago. Sept. 15. -Illinois voters
went to carefully guarded polls to
day to choose their state tickets with
republicans expressing their choice
between the leadership of Frank
#. Lowden and William Hale
Thompson. The factional fight was
•0 bitter that both sides assigned
private watchers to all polling places
Sheriff Peters contending that the
police were under control of Thomp
Mn appointed special deputies to
asatch the police.
Chicago, Sept. 15.—Bloodshed oc
curred In the state primary election
here today when Michael Fennessey
worker for the democratic candi
date for the nomination for state
senator was shot and killed by Thos.
flowers, a policeman. Patrolman
Blowers was arrested pending tfevee
'tlgatoin.
ILW
OF
WHEAT
(IlKVEY SHOWING COST OF
4iROWING WHEAT IS UASIS OF
PRIOR SUGGESTED
Kansa# City,.- Mo., .. Sept. M/—
Growers of the spring wheat produc
ing area of the northwest are to be
urged to engage in the movement
of the winter wheat growers to hold
their wheat until it brings $2.75 a
bushel at country elevators, it was
announced following a wheat grow
*ers' conference here yesterday. Rep
resentatives of farmers in Kansas,
Missouri, Oklahoma and Nebraska
ratified resolutions adopted by
Statewide meetings endorsing the
movement to hold wheat "until it
brings cost plus a small profit".
Farm organizations of Minnesota,
the Dakotas and Montana were urg
ed to appeal tp their members to
follow suit.
A survey by which it was shown
that the cost of growing a bushel
Of wheat was $2.77 in four states
did $2.75% in seven others, was
the basis of the price suggested.
The present situation in which
Wfreat is being bought now at eoun
trv shipping points as low as $2 a
oushel is not benefitting the con
sumer, the conferees said, declaring
that speculators are reaping the
benefit. The conferees contended
that a low price would result in de
creased acreage next year, less pro
duction and a consequent higher
price than that now being asked.
V
An executive committee compos
ed of Maurice McAullffe, Salina,
Kans.. William Hirth, Columbia*
Mo. C. H. Gustafson, Lincoln, Ne
braska and C. H. Hyde, Alva, Okla,,
Was named to handle details of ntat
kiting in the four states.
Connecticut Will Ri#
Convene
Special Session
:'M
I
iS'Jf
fo.
V.
-rona..'"Sept. lSA-^Flie
action of the Connecticut legislature
Which ratified the fefleral suffrage
ainendment yesterday was unconsti
tutional and the governor has called
Brother special session for Tuesday
again vote on the amendment.
o
The Presidential-
'•Yt! r?
*,
fK*
.-
k*
.•
s-
Candidates
'J
V $ ft1 ^'A a
"i,
£-mMarion,
Sept. 15.—All was quiet
Senator Harding's front porch to*
day and he had his first day of rest
to more than a week of speech mak
Uig. His Pacific coast trip strongly
nimored this week now appears to
Itave been abandoned.
1*5^, Pee*1*!10' Idaho, Sept. l£«—Gov
ernor Cox today was to carry his na
tional stump battle into Utah, the
tome state of Senator Reed Smoot,
trhom tbi'1 democratic presidential
candidate has been attacking as one
Of the three leaders of the senatorial
Oligarchy. Early risers called Gov
ernor Cox out of his berth lor a
speech here this morning.
Pocafello, Idaho, Sept. 15.—fioW
ernor Cox today challenged Senatof
Warren G. Harding and republicans
to present a definite international
plan better than the league of na
tions. The thin« for critics to do is
to give us something better or main
tain silence he said.
E IN PIE
BREAK Of NEARLY FIVE
ORNT DI KING TUB PAST
MONTH
-Bradstreets
New York Sept. 15.
Review of Trade says:
August saw another very heavy
decline in prices of commodities, a
falling off heavier in percentage
than was witnessed even in May,
following the ending of the "out
law" railway strike of April, which
later disturbance unquestionably
checked what would have been a
steady month by month decline in
prices from the high peak of Feb
ruary 1, 1920.
Bradstueet's index number as of
September 1—$17.9746—shows a
decline of 4.5 per cent from that of
August 1 the decline from the
peak point of February" 1, 1920, was
13.9 per cent, and the September 1
number was, in fact, the lowest re
corded on the first of any month
since May, 1919. It is still, howev
er. 106 per cent above the level of
the price index number of August
1, 1914. The decline in May was 4.1
per cent, though the quantitative
decline in actual value was almost
identical with that shown in Au
gust, the difference in percentage of
decline being due to the higher base
upon which the May decrease was
calculated.
The directions in which heavy de
clines occurred in August may be
seen by consulting the detailed,
tables, but it may be said at once
that weakness in the textiles, especi
ally in cotton and cotton goods, and
in the provisions group, with small
er declines in hides and leather, me
tals, vegetable oils and naval stores,
offset some strength in dried fruits,
miscellaneous products and coal and
coke. The month saw a heavy
break (10 cents) in cotton, result
ing lower prices for manufactures
thereof, and also saw weakness in
groceries, prominent among the lat
ter being sugar, with a drop of 6%
cents, tea 5 cents, coffee 2*4 cents
and rice 2 cents. A slight down
ward turn in building materials,
due probably to the check to con
struction, was an event of the
month. Coal and coke were strong
er, reaching in fact, new high rec
ord levels, and a nujnber of foods,
notably dairy products, advanced, as
did meats. No less than ten out of
thirteen groups declined In August,
and forty individual commodities
moved lower, while twenty-six ad
vanced aad forty rwaainad un
changed.
Lord Mayor's Life
Is Ebbing
Londoffc Sept. 15.—The latest
bulletin from the Sinn Fein head
quarters today stated that the con
dition of Terrence S. MacSwiney re
mained unchanged. Physicians are
puzzled over the Lord Mayor's grip
on life. Although in comatose
condition he is conscious and whis
pered his desires as to funeral rites
to his wife. His heart beats so weak
that only a stethocope can detect
it.
Londog*' Sept. 15.—Lord Mayor
MacSwiney was in a raving delirium
the greater part of last night his
sister Annie said today. He asked
his relatives to gag him so that he
might not reveal Sinn Fein secrets.
Bol&heviki Offensive
Against Poland
vt
ionftcra ftept. 18.—Wftti rddtsrm
ization of their armies completed
the BolshevikU are about to start a
general offensive against Poland
unofficial advices report today. The
object of the campaign on a major
scale is to regain Russia's shattered
military prestige principally through
Warsaw. There is fighting under
way on the entire Polish front and
particularly in the et Ml*
ctQr Lemtxig.
PPPR IP
Site Jiladisott
PLENTY Of DUCKS AND GEESE
AND AN AIOIY OF HUNT-
ERS ARE READY
Legally the hunting season for
this year begins at sunrise tomor
row, September 16. Preparations
for the hunting period were under
way two weeks ago when local hard
ware men began advertising and
selling the paraphanalia that makes
up a hunter's necessary* outfit.
I Guns, shells and accessories have
"KK been sold in sufficient numbers to
indicate a great interest in the
prospects for success as soon as the
game laws permitted hunters to en
ter the open fields in quest of ducks
and geese.
The only other* important matter
befeides equipiment is the hunting
license and to date six hundred and
eighty of these have been issued by
County Treasurer Oscar Olson. Not
only men are seeking the legal per
mission to hunt but ladies, too. Four
of the latter have paid their fee of
one dollar and received the desired
right to bag a day's limit. They
are Mrs. Julian Keller,, Mrs. R. J.
Herrick, Mrs. Ida Helmer and Mrs.
Harold Rensch, of this city. "Last
year there were no licenses Issued
to women. The four non-residents
to whom licenses were granted were
J. Schrepel. of Pipestone P. H.
Lechner and Lester Hal lien, of Leed,
Illinois, and R. J. Allenstein of
Brenner, Iowa.
It is reported by the more observ
ing that ducks and geese are plenti
ful in the lake regions and along all
streams. This means that no good
marksman need be without luck.
Wild fowl have had every oppor
tunity for wide foraging and doubt
less will make fine eating. Duck
feasts will soon be in vogue now.
Local sportsmen are only awaiting
the coming of tomorrow's dawn to
sally forth in quest of game. Auto
loads of hunters have already pass
ed through town on their way north
to favorite dock resorts.
IS
DUPREE MAN HAD READY TALE
OF HI8 EUROPE**
BERVIQB
was
Thompson saw a lot of service in
England, France, Russia and good
ness knows where else—in his
mind.
According to Harry James,
Thompson's story is as follows:
Thompon claimed to have regis
tered on June 6, 1917, at Selby, S.
D. Later he claims he went to Min
neapolis and enlisted in the regu
lars in September of the same year.
He then says he was sent to some
camp in Kansas, he could not re
member the name, and was a bit
hazy about the camp in Brooklyn
to which he says he went in Janu
ary, 1918.
From Brooklyn he went to Liver
pool, he claims, being eight days at
sea. After two weeks in the Eng
lish seaport he was sent to France
he continued. The authorities soon
found that they needed men of his
calibre on the Russian front, so he
was hastened there. He had a tough
time in the czar's land, he said, but
fought it out in sixteen months, but
he ended his service about July 1,
1919.
However, he managed to come
back on about the fourth or fifth
ship from France after the signing
of the armistice November 11, 1918.
When James grew tired about this
array of dates and asked Thompson
how the Sam Hill he could be in
Russia until July 1, 1919, and still
sail from France on the fourth or
fifth ship after the signing of the
armistice in 1918, Thompson admit
ted that he had never been la the
army at all.
o
To Settle Indus
trial Problems
Rome, Sept. 15.—Negotiations be
tween the workers soul manufaetur-
/A
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15,1920.
ers to bring about, a settlement of
the industi-tal problems will be re
sumed under government direction
according to a dries* received from
Milan. Owners are favoring a pro
fit sharing plan.
UIKE COUNTY
VITAL STATISTICS
REPORT OP COUNTY CLERK
BUilNUTT FOR THE MONTH
OP At'GUST
Oewrty Clerk has com
piled the Vital Statistics for the
month of August as follows:
Births
Sons were born to Mr. and Mrs.
Wayne Carr, Glenn Lee, John Mc
Donald, John Eggebraaten, Claude
Bolenbough, George H. Simpson,
Nels Jonson, Benjamin Sneed, O. J.
Ostroot, Lewis 11. Smith, Dighton T.
Biggs, Joseph Robert Huntimer,
Lee Corning (twins), Roger Corey,
Ertle Freiwaldt, Paul Oscar Heg
dahl, Wni. Larington, Donald Tripp.
Daughters were born to Mr. and
Mrs. Daniel Gile, Geo. W. Harrison,
Louis Jacobson, Henry P. Iiackhaus,
Dan D. Couts. Severin Merager,
Doekle Steensma, Robert Wengert,
Wni. D. Hoke, Jas. L. 8std«, An
drew Olson. 4
Death*.
Andrew Ingetuanselk, *ge twenty
four years.
Christy McGillivraj^, age seventy
years.
Eldrid Henry Janett, age three
years.
Byron A. Bronson, age seventy-one
years.
Chetser Selland, ate seven years.
Max Koepsell, pge seventeen
years.
Dor ma Van Lannlrigham, age two
mouths.
Dorthey Harrison, age no days.
(Baby) Biggs, age no days.
Marriages
Bkner J. Smith aqd Belle Temp
ter.
David M. Madsea and Mabel Anna
Hanson.
Clarence L. Denny and Minnie K.
Chase.
Dominic McGinn and Ruth C.
Riordan.
Arthur E. Magnuson and Laura
Burlingame.
Earl L. Erickson a»4 Mildred
Fleitz.
William D. Ho"ke and Carrie De
Hart.
Dale Dean Pnlver and Myrtle Sin
clair DeSomery.
Earl Holdridge and Inez Parker.
Walter G. Coppin and Amelia De
vault.
Naturalixatioes
Ludwig Zielke, declaration of in
tention.
POLICE SEEK
H.
Aerdeen, Sept. 15.—William
Thompson, of Dupree, S. B.,
the first northern South Dakota man
to be taken under the dragnet for
draft evaders. Thompson was in the
county jail Thursday where he was
brought aftegi his arrest Wednesday
a Dupree by Deputy United Slates
Marshal Harry James.
WHIFF
STOLEN ALCOHOL
EIGHT THOUSAND GALLONS TAK-
FROM A RAILWAY CAR
BY BAND OF THIEVES
Hfcnsas City, H.-~Deteo
tives with keen noses are traveling
every mile of the country between
Kansas City and New Orleans seek
ing a "whiff" of eight thousand
gallons of alcohol stolen within the
last few days somewhere along the
right-of-way of a certain railroad.
Last week a car containing eighty
barrels of grain alcohol, each bar
rel containing 100 gallons, was ship
ped from New Orleans to Kansas
City. The estimated value of the
cargo was between $70,000 aad $75,
000.
The car waa sealed, and the spir
its started on Its northern Journey
to Kansas City, where It was to be
distributed to Jobbers The cat ar
rived the middle of this week.
Freight handlers broke the seals on
the car preparatory to delivery.
But when they looked inside
for the spirits, the spirits in
true "spirit" form, were invisible.
Only the braces that had held the
barrels and a strong "familiar odor"
of bygone days, was afl that could
be found.
The disappearance is a mystery.
Seals on the car did not appear to
have been tampered with and
there was not the least indication
as to how the valuable cargo was
removed.
In the meantime an unusual evi
dence of hilarity by persons living
between Kansas City aad New Or
leans will be looked upon with the
greatest of suqpLQion, n^lrgad offi
cials declared.
4*.
y IT
SPECIAL ELECTION
TOTAL OF 997 VOTES CAST Of
FOUR WARDS—LITTLE IH-
TURK ST SHOWN
There was noihlng in the matter
of weather yesterday that could have
prevented a large turn out at yes
terday's special election called for
it he purpose of authorizing a bond
issue in the sum of $100,000 for
water and sewer extensions. Appar
enty indifference to an important
matter kept people from giving an
expression of their will on the pro
position of maintaining an available
fund of $50,000 for water extension
purposes and another $50,000 for
sewer construction.
Yesterday's vote was very light
in all wards. The total vote was
only 297, far below what it should
have been.
In the first ward 112 votes were
cast as follows: 97 for water exten
sion and 94 for sewer bonds. In the
second ward 102 votes were record
ed. Of them 97 favored bonds for
water and 44 were cast for sewer
extension. Of the 49 people who
visited the third ward polling place
44 favored 6 per cent bonds for wa
terworks extension and 43 voted for
sewer construction. In the fourth
ward 34 were counted 22 flavored
issuing onds as specified in he elec
tion notice and 12 dissented. Fi
gures on the number that favored
water works extension and those
who desired sewer extension were
unavailable. However, the bonds
carried in this ward.
The vote given yesterday will be
canvassed at the next meeting of the
city commission.
The small vote is regrettable from
any standpoint. The state fair cut in
considerably but that is negligible
when compared with the large num
ber of people who sayed at home
and made no effort to get to the
polls. In putting over a $100,000
business proposition all bond houses
prefer the backing of a large num
ber of citizens where so much is le
gally involved. Just whether the ma
jority favoring the bonds is suffici
ent large negotiations is problema
tical.
President
of
Franc#
to
Resign This Week
IS.—President fies-
chanel is tp resign this week, the
French foreign office admitted to
day. President Deschanel is suffer
ing from Neuresthenia. It is report
ed that the president's mental con
dition is worse than physical,
o 1-
Question of v
Racial Equality
i
Paris, Sept. 15.—The question of
racial equality for Japanese over
which the Versailles peace confer
ence nearly split will be one of the
jjiiost important problems confront
ing the general assembly of the
league of nations. It Is reported
that representatives of the Japanese
government will bring the matter up
at the next general assembly.
o
Daily Market Report
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis, Sept. 15.—Corn:
Weakened at close, prices 2 3
cents lower demand slow No. 3
yellow closed at $1.33 $1.34. No.
3 mixed at $1.31 $1.32.
Oats Market relatively steady.
No. 3 whites, 1 1% cents under
December demand fairly good. No.
3 whites closed at 58 59% cents
No. 4 whites at 54% 57% cents.
Rye: Easy to 2 cents lower com
pared with futures No. 2 at 5 8
cents over September, demand fair.
No. 2 rye closed at $1.89 & $1.90.
Barley: Good demand for choice
at unchanged prices, but closed easy,
prices 1 2 cents lower. Prices
cleeed at 82 cents and $1.X«
Sioux City Livestock
Sioux City, Sept. 15.—With the
extreme summit at $10.85, the bulk
of the sales ranged from $15.25 &
$16.50. Only a few odd btinchM
sold as low as $15.00 and nothing
went under that mark.
C. J. GEE
LICENSED EMBALMER AND
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
Phones: House IMS Offlee 2205
Over Johnston's
MADISOff,
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You should be as quick as others in
learning the advantages of having a
bank account in a reliable bank where
your
4
DEPOSITS AftE CTTATlA^TTEEI)
UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK
Madison, South Dakota
SECURITY STATE BANK
Madison, S.
D.
We pay 5 per cent on Time Certificates of Deposits.
Deposits Guaranteed by State Guaranty PvaC "r
Officer. "iV
C. A. 3TEN8LAMD, President W. O. GlENAM*, Vice Presid«ai
G. L. SCULLY. Cashier.
MADISON SO DAKOTA
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From this date we
frill pay 5 per cent in
terest on certificates
of Deposit for One
Year. i*
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Till] FIRST NATIONAL HANK
MADISON S
THE OLD Arv K N I. Hi
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immNIHINNlMNIHHHI^MIIHHHP
The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
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Manufacturers of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
PHONE 2341 MADISON, & D.
Horseshoeing
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Makers of High Grade Butter
the ierfteaa «f ft,
mtmnd
alteer aad am prepared to do afl kiaii
W. H. Baddalejr's
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