OCR Interpretation


The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 17, 1920, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1920-09-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

/r V
1
•*.
,r?:-
fe?-
If
V*
V:, i,r
%lr
K
$&,*>.
'*K
r.'?
YM'i
,l
'V*
i v
\4"
•V.
"&r
Pt'
Jf,
1'
i-Jf*
fy
r®„'
v*
t'
$
C§*
fe1
nj
PLACING BUME
FOR EXPLOSION
SSAfMfUfl FOR OUR W&WABB
FISCHER WHO WARNED
FK1KMOS
New York, Sept. 17.—Invest iga
tlon of the explosion in Wall street
Which cost the lives of Ihirty-three
pel-sons today was centered on a
thorough search-for Edward Fisch
er, formerly an employe of the
French high commission in New
York City. Attention was directed
to Fischer because of a warning ho
Is waid to have given his friends to
ketp out of Wall street on Septem
ber 15. Maurice Caseuave, French
high commissioner said the commis
sion had been warned in a letter
from a former employe that there
would be danger in Wall street on
the 15th of this month. George
Ketchledge, broker and old friend
of Fischer said he received a postal
card from Fischer several davtf ago
which was mailed at Toronto, Can.,
IB which he was warned to get out
of Wall street as soon as the gong
struck at three o'clock Wednesday
afternoon. Inspector Lollay of the
New York police said be was search
tajt for Edward Fischer.
-New York, Sept. 17.—-Thomas De
Lahunty, caretaker of the tennis
Courts on Amsterdam avenue today
revealed to authorities that Edward
Fischer, missing former employe of
the French high commission, warned
him two weeks ago that. Wall street
would be blown up on the 15th.
Hamilton, Ont., Sept. 17.—Ed
ward P. Fischer, suspected of
knowledge of the bomb outrage in
Wall street yesterday was arrested
In the Bank of Hamilton building
here this morning on a charge of In
sanity. Fischer is alleged to have
sent postcards from Toronto to his
friends in New York warning them
of the explosion. His arrest came as
a result of information furnished
the local police by Ms brother-in
law, Robert Pope of New York. Two
men arrived in Hamilton from Niag*
ara Falls this morning. They had*
breakfast at the Connaught Hotel.
New York, Sept. 17.—The New
York grand jury this afternoon
visited the scene of the bomb ex
plosion in Wall s\reet and made a
thorough investigation of the, plct
which cost thirty-five lives and al
to injured two hundred persons.
Hamilton, Ont., Sept. 17.—Robert
JPopo. brother-in-law of Edward P.
Fiwlier, told the authorities this aft
ernoon Fischer had not been out of
Canada for several weeks and as
cribed Fischer's warning to friends
In New York of the explosion to
mental telepathy. He said Fischer's
mind had been in a peculiar recep
tive condition for wieeks.
o
fllATMP IX f'ASH RESERVE AND
WANS AND DISCOI XTjp
'ii MIKI,' llWHVAHk
J: I
0.
Sioux Falls, Sept. 17.—Total as
|M|ts of banks and trust companies
fit the state of South Dakota de
creased $8,130,718.03, and in two
months' business period ending June
3# deposits in the banks fell off
$10,677,259.36, according to a
jifatement made by the state depart
ment of banking and finance,
v The items making up the decrease
in resources are $4,466,332.96 re
duction in cash reserve and a slump
in loans and discounts totaling $3,
405,503.52. Stocks and bonds and
t«x certificates also show a de
crease. Total assests now are $208,
472,283.94, as against $216,802,
001.97 on May 4.
Op the liability side of (he ledger
fj^e net decerase was $8,129,219.03
fetter deducting a total increase in
liabilities of $4,533,929.46. The
Sailing off in deposits, totaling $10,
77,259.36, was the largest single
Item, and th« other Items included
in the decrease made a total of $1,
§86,388.13. Capital stocks, surplus
undivided profits, bills payable, and
'notes rediscount increased $4,207,
444.34, and the other Items total
IS2MS4.12. However, in these
Items there is aa error la tfee state
'T -ww*
tllir ill
department's footing of $499. In
the depositors' guarantee fund there
I is now a total of $1,247,399.08 that
is held for the purpose of reimburs
ins depositors in the event of bank
failures. As compared with the re
port of June 30, 1919, there was a
i net increase In deposits of $1,806,
622.81.
GOV. COX SPEAKS
THROWS A SCARE INTO THE
PROGRESSIVE REPUB­
LICANS
Oft!if., Sept. If
Speaking in the home city of Sena
tor Hiram W. Johnson, Governor
Cox today predicted that if reaction
ary senatorial oligarchy gains con
trol of thf government in this cam
paign it wttl so manipulate tl& pow
er of patronage that progressive re
publicans will soon be compelled to
join another party or form one of
their own. Governor Cox asserted
if progressive republicans inclining
naturally to the idealism of Abra
ham Lincoln and Theodore Roose
velt were to stay in the republican
party they would be compelled to
"surrender to oficial representatives
of big business."
Marion, Sept. 17.—The republi
can party will not surrender the su
preme inheritance of national free
dom and self determination by per
mitting the United States to enter
into the league of nations as brought
back from Versailles by President
Wilson, Senator Warren G. Harding
promised today in a letter to Dr.
Jacob Gould Schurman, president of
Cornell university. Asked for his
views Senator Harding outlined
the views set forth in his recent
league of nations speech.
SOUTH DAKOfA BAR ASSOCIA­
TION SPECIAL X*rMlTTIgfr
TO HANDLE CAMPAIGN
Sioux FaTls, Sept. 17.—An organ
ized effort to induce the voters of
South Dakota io support the propos
ed constitutional amendment on the
salaries of state officers, will be
started Monday, -September 27, at
Huron at 10 o'clock, at which time
and place a meeting has been called
by Attorney Clarence C. Caldwell^
also as chairman of the South Da
kota Bar association special com
mittee, will assemble his commit
tee.
The question of salaries for state
officers in South Dakota has at
tracted much attention for some
years but has gone unsolved through
the failure of voters to endorse any
amendment directly raising the
salaries. The result has been that
all elective officers are serving for
ridiculously low salaries, totally in
adequate to the demands of modern
high prices yet without remedy until
the electorate can be prevailed up
on and see the injustice of the sit
uation. Many men of ability decline
to consider an elective state office
because of the prohibitive restric
tion on the salary.
When the South Dakota Bar as
sociation met here last summer, it
went on record as endorsing the
proposed amendment relative to the
salaries and decided to appoint a
committee to handle a campaign of
advocacy of this amendment. The
committee Just announced consists
of Clarence C. Caldwell, Sioux Falls,
chairman John D. Hanten, Water
town S. W. Clark, Redfield Philo
Hall. Brookings John T. Heffron,
Dead
wood Rerbert Hitchcock, Mit
chell. It Is this committee that
Mr. Caldwell has notified to meet at
Huron and lay out the campaign.
The amendment proposes to give
the legislature full authority to fi*
the salaries of all state officers by
a two-thirds vote of each houss
which safeguards against too hasty
action, and all additional perquisites
and emoluments except the ordinary
expenses of state officers entailed
while in pursuance of their official
duties, are eliminated. This would
do away with the house rent and nu
merous extras now allowed elective
stale officials under certain circum
stances, aad place the salary ques
tion on a adequate business basis.
•La*
PHOT. HlfWre ADDRESSES THE}
PUPILS OX 'HOOSI N« AN
AVOCATION
Joseph O'Connell was elected sec
retary-treasurer of the Madison
High School Athletic association at
an asembly of all the students tliisl
morning. llecause of this position
lie b«»conies chairman of the finance
committee of the association. The
games committee met at 4:00 for
an election of chairman and organ
ization of its worf.
Professor Higbie president of the
State Normal, spoke to pupils in
assembly at ten this morning. He
took for his subject "choosing an
avocation," giving pupils an idea of
observations to be made in making
right choice of life work. He con
cluded by having each pupil fill out
a questionaire from which he hopes
to gather interesting information as
to the efficiency of pupils In deter
mining life work.
Several teachers of the school are
planning on spending the week end
at Lake Madison.
Two acidents of rather serious
consequence have happened during
the we«fk. Edwin Sunde while us
ing the joiner in the manual train
ing department on Thursday before
school hours suffered the loss of
tips of three fingers. He was wait
ed upon immediately by a doctor
^and taken to the hospital. This will
kffect the type of work which Ed
w\n will be able, to do as he has
been the pupil of the typewriting
department and was taking special
lessons in piano. The school Is
sorry of his misfortune.
Parker Newcomb has been wear
ing his arm in a sling because of
a fracture oi collar whicli he re
ceived while practicing football on
Wednesday evening. He is improv
ing rapidly and has not missed any
school.
A number of bogs went duck
hunting and others attended the
state fair during the week but all
have reported with proper creden
tials from home as to their absence
and the week has ended in harmony.
Miss Simpson, the music teacher,
will enjoy the week end in a mo
tor trip to Minneapolis accompanied
with other members of her family
who arrived in Madison during the
day.
Plans have been perfected for in
troducing a fifth teacher at the Lin
coln building and new programs
will be arranged in that building for
the opening of school on Monday.
in EN6NEERS
SOUTH DAKOTA HIGHWAY DE-
PARTMKNT MAKES NEW
•if
ASSIGNMENTS
Pierre, Sept. 17.—Several changes,
have been made in the state high
way department the past few days.
State Highway Engineer F. S. Peck
has resigned and will take the po
sition of district engineer for the
department in the Fifth district, the
Black Hills section, which will per
mit him to live in h^ old home at
Deadwood.
Fred If. tV\ Schrler, who has been
assistant highway engineer, has been
advanced to the position of highway
engineer.
H. S. Sternberg has been made
district engineer for the First dis
trict, with headquarters at Pierre
Earl Eby has been made district en
gineer for the Second district with
headquarters at Brookings O. N.
Hetel has been made district engin
eer for the Third district, with head
quarters at Pierre, and A. 8. Man
ning has been made district engin
eer for t^e Fourth district.
The state highway commission
has removed the county highway en
gineer of Hughes county on a charge
of neglect of official duty,
ii Vim O
f"v$#
1
l^,»
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1920.
y'.' -IJ'
Airplane Kills
Six Wild Duck*
Sioux Falls, Sept. 17.—In spite
of ^he state and federal game laws
which protect the' wild game In their
flights to and from the northern
and southern feeding places, a new
menace has appeared for the birds.
Six of them—big, healthy brants—
fell before the now peril.
An exceptionally large flock or
brants, whleh many people thought
over the £lty
and attracted a lot of attention
among the hunters. There were
probably 3&0 in the flock and they
were circling around as If in search
of a place to rest. Later it was
learned that their unusual actions
were occasioned by an airplane
which was giving exhibitions at the
Bouton celebration. The aviator
divided "the birds and the leaders
were seeking to get thoin together
again. While sailing around, thej
machine ran into a portion of the
flock and rtx of them were killed.
DESPITE MEN
J|KE OWN LIVES
ROXkSIK1!'fj MllMER SHOOTS
SELF—BISON MAN PLUNOES
I»KATH IN POND
s
Chamberlain, Sept. %7.—Two sui
cides are reported in widely separat
ed parts of the state.
One of the victims was Joseph
Turnover, a farmer of the Bonesteei
district, who ended his life by shoot
ing himself. Before he committed
the act he drove the other members
of his family from the house with a
gun. telling them as they fled in
fright where they would find his
body. He then turned the gun upon
himself. For some time he had
been suffering from a cancer on his
face and had been operated on sev
eral timee. Brooding over his ail
ment is supposed to have deranged
his mind and caused him to take his
life.
The other victim of suicide was
Donald J. Corrigan, a sheep-herder
in the -employ of Anderson & Aaker
of the Bison district, in the north
western part of the state. For three
weeks before his suicide Corrigan
had entire charge of the sheep on
the ranch. The solitude is believed
to have unbalanced his mind. Sev
eral acquaintances saw him riding
i-.orthward toward a railroad, but he
was unable#to give them a clear idea
of where he was going.
A short Hime after being seen by
acquaintances he left his horse and
plunged to his death in a waterhole,
where Ids -was found. The
abandoned sheep were found scat
tered over the prairie. His parents
formerly lived in the Bison district
but now are residents of LaGrange,
W.
French President
Has Resigned
Ftris, Sept. 17.—Premier Mlller
artd submitted' President Paul
Deschanel's resignation to the
French cabinet today. The French
cabinet announced the national as
sembly will be called to Versailles
next Tuesday to qlect
Deschanel's successor*
r*v
o-
Another Romance
Of the War
Falls, Sept. 17.—Corres­
pondence started during the world
war, when thousands of girls in the
United States wrote letters to Am
erican soldiers they did not know,
for the purpose of cheering them up
during their service overseas, has
resulted in the marriage of Miss Al
niina L. Wagner, a South Dakota
girl and Paul F. Frederic, a return
ed service man, of Rivulet, Mont.
The bride is a daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Wagner, of Beresford.
The correspondence between Miss
Wagner and Frederic lasted
throughout the war and was con
tinued after the war closed. Soon
after he returned from service over
seas, Frederic visited Beresford and
was formally Introduced to the girl
with whom he had corresponded so
long. A proposal of marriage fol
lowed and was accepted.
For some time the bride was an
attache of the Bereford Republic and
gained a reputation as a newspaper
womt§»
in ip
u
III,
I
Farmer Killed
By Angry Bull
Hayti, Sept. 17.—While doing the
chores on his farm northeast of
Hayti, Frederick Johnson was at
tacked by an angry bull. He was
dead when assistance reached him.
He and his daughter, Ida, were
milking and Mr. Johnson attempted
to drive away the four-year-old,
which had broken through tho
fence.
The infuriated animal hacked up
.a few paces and then made a lunge
for Johnson. The_bull landed his
head squarely upon Johnson's chin,
breaking his neek.
He then turned his attentions to
the daughter, who ran from the
yard before being reached}
SIFEIYP
FEW MORE DAYS WARM WEATR.
Elt WILL PLACE CROP BE-
YOND DAMAGfc BY FROST
Pierre, ftstt. 1|.—Tha weather
the past week has* been more like
August than average September, and
he farmers who are making hay
and watching the corn crop to see
how it is getting past the frost line
are hoping that the present sunshine
and high temperature will continue
for at least 10 days more.
That time will clear practically
every field of corn in this part of
the state.
Already most of the fields are la
Ulie clear, and only a few days more
like the present will make tne crop
all safe.
Some of the farmers Who can
spare the time from haying opera
tions are putting the corn cutters
to work, and getting their corn into
the shock, while others will allow it
to stand and pick it in the fields.^
Haying is being pushed, and hun
dreds of stacks are being piled up
all over this part of the state.
Presho, one of the leading hay
shipping points last year, reports
the shipment of over 75 cars of hay
for August, and that only the lack
of cars prevented the ahjupmpnl of
double this number.
Tells Best Time
To Sow Timothy
Brookings, Sept. 17.—'1 have a
piece of land which I Wtsh to seeil
to timothy and red clover, as it is
too wet to work in the spring. I
would like to know if It will work
to sow these seeds in the fall, and
at what time. Would you advise
sowing together with rye, and how
much per acre of each kind?"—O.
J.. Kingsburg county.
Reply by Dr. A. N. Hume, State
college agronomikt: "My guess Is
that you will get better results
sowing with early (sixty-day) oats
or barley. Sow not over one bush
ed of the oats or barley per acre as
a nurse crop. Prepare the land in
the fall and sow in the spring. Sow
the nurse crop first, then sow the
•lover and timothy mixture (7 lbs.
each by weight) 14 pounds per
acre and narrow in immediately. If
you can do this in April—the earli
er the better—the thin seeding of
small grain will make a good crop
of grain. If perchance the season
is dry, cut the small grain crop
early for hay. That will give the
clover and timothy the best chance.
"The fall rye crop is a good idea.
South Dakota may well put out a
lot of it but suggest using the
Shorter spring grain* for Mif**
Crops."
Grant Charters to
Banking Concerns
PtOrre, Sept. 17.—The state bank
ing department has authorized the
Guarantee State bank to begin busi
ness at Eureka. This is to take
the place of the National bank,
which failed at that place several'
weeks ago. Among the officials of
the new bank are Fred Hepperlee,!
who was for four years at the head
of the state land department.
The department has also author
ized the Farmers and Merchants
State bank of Scotland to begin
business in that town. This is to fill
the place made vacant by the recent
failure of the Bon Homme County
State bank at that place. Christian
Hirnlng, who has been one of the
examiners of the ttate banking de
partment, will become cashier of
the new Scotland Institution.
o
Dally Market Report
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis, Sept. 17. Corn:
Market, 2 & S cents lower early
tand 5 cents down at close demand
*poor. No. 3 yelow closed at 1.28
& fl.it No. 3 mixed at $1.24 &
$1.27.
Oats: Demand was fair and dis
counts were unchanged to cent
easier No. 3 whites 1% cents
under December. No. 3 whites clos
ed at 57% & 58% cents No. 4
whites at 54 67% cents.
Rye: Market easy demand only
fair No. 2 at cents over
September. No. 2 rye closed at $1
II IIJl
Barley: Demand quiet aad prices
easy to 1 cent lewsr fair amonnt
of sales at unchanged prices. Prtees
at caata and $1*04,
4
T**r
a:
,4.
1
I
err*
With
Sioux City, Alpt. it
at $17.26. Mihog
ra» &***
A:
•t
Year.
-it
The
*^w^r w
w»"'
•f^ t" Jf'.- l*f,
„il*k -. "i \i ^, *S
jr. 'hi- K"
V 'i* .. I"' 4*.' '•$#*
1V'- v"'
V V
"X
PHONE 2341
*JL
You should be as quick as others in
learning the advantages of having a
bank account in a reliable bank wherfc
your
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEED
-UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK
Madison, South Dakota
*41
SECURITY STATE BANK
Madison, S. D.
', We pay & per cent on Time Certificates of Deposits.
"'•""m Deposits Guaranteed by State Guaranty Fund.
Officers
©. A. BTRNSLAND, President W. G. OIENAPP, Vtoe PrasMtM
G. L. SCULLY, Cashier.
A BANK TOW THE otOPLE
ecur/fy\fate
MADISON SO DAKOTA
Madison Cr
ROGNESS BRQS., Proprieton
Makers of High Grade ButtCT
v
*?w V rr JT
V»J sViy^X i!^Un'-W ,# v,V. U-?-
.» Vf A i ?)i
per cent.
"v
•r*"i
H,
Y
1
1 .*
«{w «., 1 *f v
V.
4
U4
4tt ,. ,*
-.• i js, .*" *0 *T! "$
*u

~*J
1
~Ji-
9
i'" ".
-V*
4
n V"4
Front tntt ana we
will pay 5 per cent In
terest on certificates
of Denosit for One
'V-J5S
i y ,* m'- vmmSe
liftitixncturm of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft
Highest Market frice FakS te&tftin
•,n*
a
a
4
y ».
•"'1
MAD]
e.m
vci I!
I kin Hi—li.l
a a
W.H.

xml | txt