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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, April 06, 1921, Image 1

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E
I HASTY
MATTER WILL GET IM)FK WAY
AT THK SPECIAI, SKS-
^(ON.
Washington, D. C.» April f,—Al
though the resolution declaring a
separate peace with Germany is to
be reintroduced at the special ses
sion of congress, plans of republican
leaders as they shape up after many
conferences include no provision for
hurrying the measure to a roll call.
In some quarters close to the ad
ministration, it was believed tonight
that the peace declaration, vetoed by
President Wilson, must wait on the
calendar of deferred business for 90
days or more while President Har
ding tries ou't his preliminary ideas
for establishment of an association
of nations.
How far the president may have
concurred in such a program was not
revealed, but in some quarters it was
pointed out that with the resolution
hanging fire in congress the admin
istration might be able to exert an
enlarged influence in securing ac
ceptance of its peace plans by other
nations. -Technically, this govern
ment still would be at war with Ger
many, exercising full privileges of a
belligerent in the arrangement of a
final peace, and still actually asso
ciated with the allies.
In such circumstances, it was sug
gested, the possibility of a separate
peace might be used diplomatically
along with the foreign loan situa
tion aa a leverage to secure accept
ance of Mr. Harding's plans for his
peace association.
It is known that the subject of a
peace declaration has occupied inter
est of administration officials re
cently, and that several alternate
plans have been urged on the presi
dent. Saturday he conferred with
Senator Knox, republican, author of
the original separate peace measure,
and today he talked with Senator
Lodge, republican senate leader, and
Senators Watson, of Indiana, and
Brandegee, of Connecticut.
Today the British ambassador, Sir
Ajuckland Geddes, also called at the
White House, although it was said
the visit was one of courtesy.
o
Co-Operative Grain
Marketing oCnference
Chicago, Aftil 6.—Plans for co
operative marketing of grain were
worked out by rtpresentatives of the
leading farmers' organizations of na
tion here today. Henry C. Wallace,
secretary of agriculture, conferred
with farmers on marketing plans
and assured them of government as
sistance in selling their grain. Wal
lace declared that there was just as
much reason why the government
should assist the farmer in develop
ment methods for marketing his
crops efficiently as there is for aid
ing him in increased production.
The meeting today was held to ra
tify the marketing plan worked out
by the committee of 17 appointed
last July. The plan will not inter
fere with existing farm organiza
tions. It is purely a co-operative
plan, chairman Gustafson said.
o
Settling Th«
British Coal Strike
London, April 6.—Premier Lloyd
George has asked mine owners to
reopen negotiations for settlement
of their dispute, it was announced
officially. The miners promptly
agreed to the proposition and conver
sation will be renewed shortly.
London, April 6.—British coal mln
ers and Colliery owners agreed to
day to reopen negotiations for set
tlement of the coal strike. Repre
sentatives of both accepted the good
offices of the government in arrang
ing conferences. Mine owners said
their acceptance was contingent up
on the miners promising to prevent
flooding of pits. Arbitration was in
sight it was announced.
o
Texas Tornado
Does Damage
Clarendon, Texas, April 6.—Dam
age estimated at a quarter of a mil
lion dollars was done last night when
a cyclone struck the main street of
this city smashing plate glass win
dows, wrecking awnings and signs
out of place and leaving debris in its
wake. Fire started in the business
section and wiped out three buildings,
Boards O
I Chicago, April ft.—-Boards of ad
justment mean prompt settlement of
controversies between employer and
employe, Bert Jewell, labor leader,
told the railway labor board today.
Mr'. Jewell testified against abroga
tion of national working agreements.
PRESIDENT PROMISES TO DO
ALL HE CAN TO SOLVE PROB­
LEM.
Washington, April 6 President
Harding has buckled down to a com
prehensive study of the railroad
problem and it is hinted that he may
have a special message on the sub
ject for congress early in the special
session.
The president now is in the study
ing stage of the railroad issue and
conferred in separate conferences
with Bert M. Jewell, president of the
railroad employees department of
the American Federation of Labor
and member of tbe railroad labor
board, and A. Garretson, former
president of the Brotherhood of Kaii
way Conductors. In these discus
sions the president sought to learn
all that he could o fthe employees'
side of the railroad situation.
"The president seemed intensely
interested in the railroad case," said
Mr. Jewell after more than an hour's
talk with Mr. Harding. "He was
seeking information and I gave him
all I could presenting the case of the
railroads from the employees' stand
point. I sought to convince the pre
sident of the mistaken claim of the
railway executives that they cannot
operate successfully without a reduc
tion in wages. There are many ways
that the railroads can reduce operat
ing expenses legitimately without re
ducing wages.
"We did not discuss my telegram
to the president asking him to call a
conference of the executives and em
ployees further than to refer to it
and the president said that he want
ed to do all that he could to be of
help in the matter."
Mr. Garretson denied any govern
mental ownership hint.
DROP PLANS
FOB RECALL
NORTH DAKOTA LEAGUERS TO
CENTER EFFORTS ON COL
LECTING FINDS TO FIGHT
INDEPENDENTS.
Fargo, April 6.—The NefitrnftHan
league of North Dakota will not seek
to recall any anti-Nonpartisan state
officials or legislators. This decision
was reached by the league executive
state committee in session here last
night. When the anti-Nonpartisan
decided on a recall election against
league officials recently, it was re
ported the league would start a
sweeping retaliatory recall.
Reasons for the decision were giv
en by committee members as fol
lows:
That it was felt that the recall was
invoked by the anti-Nonpartisans
"without reason and against the pro
test of the great majority of North
Dakota voters."
That the committee felt that all
the time and money at the disposal
of the league should be put to the
task of opposing the recall of league
officials.
That it was considered best to
spare the state the expense of a re
call.
he committee members favored
speedy collection of $150,000 for
use in fighting the recall. The
league slogan will be "Vote No on
Everything."
111
he illaOi
i
No reports ol' persons being killed!
or seriously injured in the tornado
have been made this morning.
_o
Adjustment
'WUI"
Wisconsin
Politician Dies
Madison, Wis., April 6.—James
Thompson, candidate for the United
States senate in 1919 and 1920, on
the LaFollette progressive move
ment. died early today at his home in
La Crosse, following an operation
for appendicitis.
UL CLUB
ALL OVERTURES TO MERGE
HKRCHANTS' ASSOCIATION
FAIL
At their regular monthly meettttg1
held in their rooms last evening the
members of the Commercial club
made a definite and final decision
on the resolutions adopted by the
joint committees comprised of citi
zens and members of the Madison
Merchants' asociation.
An attempt had been made to or
ganize a Chamber of Commerce the
membership of which would include
business interests both of the Com
mercial club and the Merchants' as
sociation. To build up such an ac
tive body certain changes in the con
stitution of the club were proposed,
taken imdei advisement, and finally
submitted for action either of accept
ance or re eel ion by the members of
the Comn ercial club.
To merge the Merchants' associa
tion with the club by forming a sep
arate bureau for its credit activity
was one of the principal features in
the proposition.
Alter weeks of effort in trying to
get together on common ground it
was almost unanimously decided last
night that full rejection of the pro
posed resolutions be placed on the
Commercial club's minutes. This, of
course, signifies that the club has
gone on record as opposing any
change of name or independent ac
tion. Its membership includes a hat
over one hundred names and those
most interested consider thai their
constitution and by-laws cover all the
activities suggested in the rejected
resolutions. Furthermore, the Com
mercial club extends an invitation to
business and citizens generally to
join them in furthering all enter
prises and interests that look toward
the upbuilding of Madison.
Dr. Higbie was present last even
ing and mentioned that all the coun
ty superintendents of the state had
been called to meet here on April
19-21 for a three days session on
vitalised agricultural work intended
for rural schools. Upon being ap
prised of this fact President R. E.
Scudder apointed two committees,
one to look after transportation and
the other to make arrangements for
entertainment of the visiting edu
cators. It is hoped to have autos
engaged to convey to Madison the
people coming over the Northwestern
road to ArlEington. This confer
ence is a big event for our city and
it has been proposed that, preceding
the meeting, a special effort be made
by all citizens to clean up their pre
mises and alleyways in order to
properly impress the strangers com
ing to our city.
Tbe club feels that it is prospering
and able to function in all matters
relating to our municipal welfare.
Two other committees were also
appointed last evening. One of them
will take up the matter of a budget
system and the second will arouse
interest in increasing membership.
Now that the club has announced
itself unmistakably it remains to be
seen whether or not an attempt will
still be made to institute a chamber
of commerce entirely independent of
either the Merchants' association or
the commercial club or fa conjunc
tion with the former.
BLUE UWS DEFIED
IN DAKOTA CITIES
THEATERS PLAY TO CAPACITY
HOUSES, REFUSING TO HEED
WARNING.
Pierre, April 6.—No attempt was
made to enforce the South Dakota
blue laws in Pierre Sunday and re
ports were received here from Sioux
Falls, Mitchell and other leading
cities of the state that no effort was
made to clamp the lid on in those
places. In fact, theaters were run
ning to capacity houses, the reports
added, and it was learned that base
ball games were played in various
parts of the state.
Heads of the South Dakota State
Baseball league have declared that
the league will be forced to quit be
fore the 1921 season starts if the
blue laws are enforced and point out
that Sunday is the only day in the
week when the majority of people,
particularly working people, have an
opportunity for recreation or amuse
ments. Their stand is backed up by
theater men, coalectloaexs, ice cream*
KlADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA^ WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6,1921.
sells, news dealers and all others do
ing Sunday business. Furthermore,
the Sunday dealers contend they
voice the sentiment of practically all
the people.
On the other hand, sticklers for
the drastic movement, declare that
the blue laws should be enforced by
all means, that it is wrong to have
baseball, movies or other amuse
ments Sundays.
—n
E
Deadwood, April 6.—A total of
1,085,671'acres of national forest
land is now under cultivation in this
state, according to announcement
just made by George A. Duthie, for
est supervisor here.
The Black Hills contain two of the
national forests, the Black Hills na
tional forest having an area of 476,
890 acres and the Harney national
forest, 535,610 acres. In addition.
Mr. Duthie added, there are 73,171
acres of national forestry iu Hard
ing county in the northwestern cor
ner of the state.
The national forests of South Da
kota were created in 1898, and under
a corps of workers, whose duty it
has been to keep them continually
productive, they have grown until
today they are among the best in
the world. The western yellow pine
constitutes about per cent of the
timber, the remainder truing made
up of eastern white spruce, aspen,
white birch, scrub oak and green
ash. Of them, only the pine and
spruce are commercially valuable.
The estimated stand of western yel
low pine. Mr. Duthie continued, is
approximately 2,225,000,000 feet and
of spruce' 50,000,000 feet.
Growth studies which recently
have been completed disclose the
fact that it takes from 150 to 200
years for the trees in the Black Hills
to reach merchantable size many of
the trees are from 400 to 600 years
old, but the rate of growth since
they reached maturity has been ex
ceedingly slow.
"Our arm," Mr. Duthie declared,
"is to sell all of these mature and
over mature trees as fast as a mar
ket can be found and to 'retain in
the forests only the young, thrifty,
fast growing trees. By this means,
we expect to reduce the average afe
of the trees at maturity, or the aver
age age of obtaining merchantable
timber to 100 or 120 years."
Firemen Help
The Stork
Chicago, April 6.—The fire de
partment today was called to aid the
stork shortly after a sou was born
to Mrs. William Brown. Doctor J.
L. Albright in effort to save it life
with a pulmotor turned in fire
alarm. The pulmotor squad worked
an hour over the child but it died.
Women To Govern
Kansas Town
Thayer, Kas., April 6.—Two wid
owed grandmothers three housewiv
es and a telephone operator workers
will direct the destines of this town
of four hundred during the next
year. Business men are tired of old
men administrations and swept wo
men into power in "municipal elec
tions.
New Highway
Contracts Let
Pierre, April 6.—The highway de
partment has let bids on a number
of contracts at figures far lower than
those of several years, the contracts
ranging from 32 1-2 to 40 cents per
yard for earth work.
Contracts let were to W. R. Ship
man Construction company on the
highway from Ethan to Tripp, in
DavLson and Hutchinson counties.
L. E. Gage, on Minnehaha county
highway, from Hartford to west line
of county.
Dowd & Schreiber secured the con
tract in Codington county, from Wa
tertown to west line of county.
Stevens Bros., the contract in
Campbell county, from Mound City
to Herreid.
R. P. England the contract In Sul
ly county, from Onida to north line
of county.
Bridges on the Davison-Hutchin
son county contract were let to the
Diamond Engineering Co., of Grand
STATE COLLEGE
II
1,085,671 ACRES OF NATIONAL
PRESERVES IN STATE.
MAKE OFFERINGS CHOICEST
FRViW AND HARDY PLANTS.
Brookings, April 6.—"Solve the
farm problems of the western up
lands," is the 1921 slogan suggested
by the department of horticulture of
South Dakota State college in the la
test departmental bulletin. In this
bulletin, Dr. N. E. Hansen lists the
latest northern novelties for 1921, in
tale, alfalfas and a table cereat.
eluding some new fruits, ornamen
Among the new offerings are some
choice hybrid plums, one of them
two inches in diameter, a non-blight
ing, red-jellied crab apple, and a
new hybrid of Siberian crab and
Duchess apple.
Others among tlk« Mir offerings
arc
Russian silver-leaved willow
These trees have made a strong
Wild gooseberries, pure native
seedlings of the seventh generation
vigorous, very productive thorny
fruit large, black, smooth makes an
excellent red Rauce.
There is also a short season musk
melon of the Turkestan group, be
sides a very early watermelon, both
of these found in cultivation in Si
beria. The results in breeding har
dy roses are evident from the Teton
kaha, a new hybrid variety.
Indian Prisoner
Makes Escape
Farmers Want
Drainage System
1
Siberian buckthorn, hardier than i
the common buckthorn, foliage a,
brighter green and appears earlier
an attractive ornamental shrub for
the lawn, either for hedges or as
single specimens. 1
A new bush honeysuckle brought
from Siberia, of tall growth with yel-j
low or red berries. Good for hedges,
screens or as single specimens.
i
A new Siberian willow, good for
a nursery tie willow or for basketry,
"Yoxr may tie bow knots in these!
pliable shoss," says Dr. Hansen,
"but it appears practically impossi
ble to break them."
1
growth, are perfectly hardy and artj
noteworthy for the silvery foliage— i
a rich silver satin on both sides. i
White River, April 6.—Good Beav-!
er, a Sioux Indian, who was arrested I
with several other Indians and whites
on the charge of being implicated I
in recent cattle "rustling" operations
in this part of the Rosebud country,]
succeeded in making his escape, and
thus far no trace of him has been i
found. Good Beaver is in poor health
and for this reason was being held
filone in a room, from which he had
Ho great difficulty in making his es
cape.
Brookings, April 6.—It is expected
that in the near future work will
commence on one of the large drain
age projects to be undertaken in
South Dakota this year. More than
60 per cent of the farmers living
along the Big Sioux river in Brook
ings county have petitioned the
county commissioners for the con
struction of the drainage system,
whic hwill be within Brookings
county. A definite decision as to
whether or not the task will be un
dertaken will be announced at a
meeting of the county commissioners
on May 7.
The project involves the draining
of approximately 63,000 acres of
the richest land In the state. The
cost is estimated at $350,00+.
o
Daily Market Report
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis, April 6.—Com.-—Of
ferings small, prices relatively lc
higher No. 4 yellow, 12 Hand 14c
under Chicago May No. 3 yellow
closed at 49 and 60c No. S mixed
at 47 and 48c.
Oats.—Firm No. 3 white and
1V4C over May offerings light No.
3 whites closed at 32% and 32%c
N o 4 w i e s a 2 9 a n 3 1 %c.
Rye.—Firm, premiums lc better
No. 2 at 7 and 8c over May offer
ings small. No. 2 rye closed at
$1.34% and $1.35%.
Barley—Firm to lc higher choice
iu good demand, offerings light.
Prices closed at 47 and 67c.
8iom Ctty Livwtodi.
Sioux City, April 6.—With tops at
$9.50, the bulk of the hog sales
imaged Iroaa ti.ZZ #gui
3BKSGBC
Sparkling Gem
East River
Stettittg
:nvtmw*r
BANKING
IN SAFETY
You should be aa quick aa others in
learning tho advantages of having a
bank account in a reliable bank where
your
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEED
UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK
Madison, South Dakota
There isn't one single particular pertaining to the banking
business in which this bank is not prepared to give you the
Mme of good nervier.
OUR ABILITY AND WILLINGNESS
to serve you represents your opportunity.
WE INVITE YOU
To start your account here and grow with u&
The start once made, your growth is assured.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
W
FfDLRAL kE StRVF.
MADISON, S. D.
THE OLDEST BAMK LAKJE COUNTY.
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5
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The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
Makers of High Grade Butter
Manufacturers of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks i
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
PHONE 2341 MADISON, S.
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THE TEST OF ALL
Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.
Phone 2343 H. BLAGKN, Age*»
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COAL COAL
Large and Small Briquets
ucky Lump plint Lump
Cok#.
W. KETCHAM & SON
PHONE 2338
IIINiaillUllllliailllMltlllllUIIIIIIIUIIUIIitHIIHWIUIIIIIIMHIII
I
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k
D.
Pine Kindling
Soft Coal Oak and Maple Wood
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