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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, April 14, 1921, Image 1

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FARMERS SHAPING
DELEGATH FROM W STATES
MAPPING OI ItKJJKF PT.AXS
FOK TION BY (XNGKKSS.
Washington, D. C., April 14.—
Lower transportation charges, econo
my in taxation, equal treatment un
der any tariff law and short time
credits are among subjects represent
atives of farmers in thirty states
bet an discussing today, preliminary
to making up a program of legisla
tion to be asked of congress for re
lief of the agricultural situation. The
executive committee and delegates
fro mthe associations of the Ameri
can Farm Bureau federation began
conferences which are expected to
continue ten days, and which include
a meeting with President Harding
and is cabinet
Wndn3sday
In addition to receiving reports to
day the committee was addressed by
A. T. Fowler, member of the federal
farm loan board, and held a round
table discussion with Governor Har
ding of the federal reserve board.
Secretary Wallace is expected to
meet with the delegates tomorrow to
go over the tariff situation.
Secretary Wallace announced today
that a committee of live stock men
in the west were taking up the ques
tion of developing a marketing or
ganization on the plan of the gram
marketing cummittee of 17, which
»va= latitied ait Chicago last week
This outcome of the Chicago meet
u£. Mi Wallace asserted, should b«*
i eassuriiig" to those who had fear
ed the farmers were trying "to de
velop a corner on their own product."
Ill
fiJIHDSIMIOtf
INTRODUCES RESOLUTIOM FOR
PROBE—CONSOLIDATIOH Of*
SYSTEMS.
Washington, Aptil 14—Senator Al
bert Cummins, of Iowa, by introduc
ing Tuesday his resolution calling for
a thorough investigation of the rail
road crisis, hopes to lay all facts in
the situation before the country, and
to determine if possible, the causes
that are threatening the breakdown
of transportation.
He says charges of mismanage
ment an dineffieiency will be investi
gated, together with charges of la
bor inefficiency.
•'We want all the facts," said Sen
ator Cummins, "no matter who is
hit. The expenses both for mainten
ance and operation are too high. Giv
ing all weight possible to the dimin
ished traffic, it will not account for
the negligible net income of the
roads.
"It is costing the railroads too
much to earn the money which they
are earning. This may be due to mis
management or to inefficiency or to
unreasonable compensation to those
that operate the roads from presi
dent down."
Senator CummAns still declines to
believe government ownership is in
prospect. But he can conceive a sit
uation where the government might
be forced to step in, if present ten^
dencies are not checked. He declared
his belief that government operation
had proved a failure and was to be
Bhunned.
He said he believed economies
could be affected which could save
$600,000,000 or $700,000,000 yearly,
mentioning the possible saving of
$300,000,000 in the labor bill, $150,
000.000 in the coal and $75,000,000
in the bill for ties. Senator Cummins
explained he was not in favor of
wholesale wage cuts, but said he be
lieved the saving could be made
o u e a u s e n s w i o u
greatly disturbing basic prices.
Coupled with this he hopes a busi
ness revival, increasing traffic, will
swell the roads' income, and that the
cost of materials and supplies will
come down.
He said he would endeavor to
bring about consolidation of the
roads into possibly 18 great systems
and that meantime regional consoli
dation as favored by Cummins is be
ing prepared by the Interstate Com
merce Commission.
"The business of the country must
know what it eosts to operate the
tailroads," sal Senator Cummins.
'That is axiomatic. At the same
time they must be operated efficient-!
iv and in the best interests of the
public. The people will note be con
tent to tax themselves to maintain
the roads."
More Rescued
From The Sea1
Beaumont, Texas. April 14.—Thir
fppn more members of the crew of
the ill fated Colonel Bowie were
picked up eight miles off port of
Tampico. according to a radio mess
age received by port authorities.
II
and with
(hp joint agricultural committees and
other members of congress Friday
night.
REPORTS SHOW SEEIMNG OPER­
ATIONS WELL ODER WAY
THROI CiHOUT STATE.
Grand Forks, N. D., April 14.—
Seeding operations in North Dakota
were reported well under way
throughout the state today, when a
survey of conditions in a general way
was made through the offices of the
county agents and the extension di
vision of the North Dakota agricul
tural college. In the extreme north
eastern tier of counties, seeding can
not be started for a week or 10 days
as the result of the t»eavy snowfall
last week, which l^ft th»* field* too
wet for work.
The acreage to be placed under cul
tivation will approximate five per
cent under 1^0. while the area to be
dfvoted' to wheat will be about 15
per cent less than last year.
In the northern part of the state
the acreage will be reduced but
alightly and reports from the south
western district indicate that from
25 to 40 per cent less will be culti
vated than in 1920. In that section
the land is reported too dry, but in
Golden Valley county and other dis
tricts in the extreme western section,
"There crop failures have been preva
?nt the last five years, conditions
ave never been better. Reports from
Beach in Golden Valley, also estimat
ed the acreage at approximately the
same as in 1920.
County agents of northern North
Dakota, in conference here with agri
cultural and livestock experts from
the state agricultural college, declar
ed that the financial stringency in the
u a o u n i i e s i s e s o n s i e
the reduced acreage. Many farmers
are attempting to do their spring
seeding without outside assistance
and, a« a result, have been forced to
reduce the area put under cultivation.
Wages throughout the state, rec
ommended by the Farm Bureau fed
eration, have been fixed at $35 and
$40 a month. The supply of mar
ried men. seeking labor for them
selves and wives, has been too plenti
ful. No district has reported a short
age of labor. The influx of laboring
men from the lumber camps of north
ern Minnesota the last 10 days has
placed the supply far above the de
*n u t*
Texas Town Des
troyed By Tornado
McKinnev. Texas, April 14.—With
eight known dead and fifty injured,
several seriously, relief parties con
tinued to search the ruins in the
town of Melissa which, with the ex
ception of one or two buildings, was
laid waste by a tornado late yester
day.
Dallas, Texas, April 14.—Ten are
dead and probably seventy five in
jured as a result of the tornado in
Mellisaa, Texas. Appeals for relief
reached here by courier. OtliT com
munication is halted.
Broker Lives
With Two Wives
MMr Hrk. April M.—Herbert
Thorn ton Andrews, 30, a -prosperous
Wall street broker, today promised
full explanation of the strange cir
cumstances under which he is resid
ing with two women in a Jersey City
apartment. Each one claims to be
his wife. Maud Augusta Andrews
paid he married Andrews in Port
land. Maine, in 1912. Esther Marie
Andrews said she married Andrews
in Pittsburgh last January. The first
Mrs. Andrews is the mother of two
'children, John, eight, and Harley,
six. Andrews Ls said to claim that
I the first woman was never legally
his wife. There was frequent trouble
between the two women but Andrews
always smoothed it over.
I
WSIIICT MEETING
IEDEKU6 SUCCESS
OVER ONE WTXDTIED DELEGAT-
EH ENTERTAINED IX HOME
OF LOCAL MEMBERS.
When the district meeting of Re
bekahs opened their sessions at 2:30
p. m. yesterday there were more than
a hundred delegates present repre
senting Ramona, Howard, Fedora.
Winfred, Carthage and Vilas. Many
Si 'hat number made the drive to
Madison by auto. At the depot in
coming trains were met by a recep
tion committee that assigned district
~nd assembly officers to certain Mia
ison honn'.s for entertainment.
In the afternoon there were pres
ent as guests of honor Mrs. M. C.
Orr-Elliot, grand assembly presi
dent Mrs. Selen R. Fish, of Red
field, past assembly president Mrs.
Hattie Borland, assembly secretary
and Mrs. Julif F. Ball, past assem
bly president. Durins the course of
tin' day these officers gave inierest
ttic talks to th»* visiting delegates and
slsn to the members of Hope Lodge
No. 2. Mrs. George Matthews, of this
city was the presiding officer.
The principal feature of the dis
trict meeting, aside fro mthe inner
work, was the awarding of a banner
to the lod*:e making the best show
ing in secret work. The honors this
lime w^nt to Carthage whose repre
sentatives present appreciatively re
ceived the distinction given their
lodge.
The regular meeting of the local
lodg** occurred at 8:00 p. m. follow
ing a two course dinner served to
250 people a( Odd Fellow hall The
tables at the dinner
wext.
beautifully
decorated with clusters of snapdra
gons and soiiiax.
Two Candidates were Initiated at
last night's session after which a
short, program was rendered. Fol
lowing the opening song, "America,"
there were two solo selections by
Miss Seligar, of Canova. A special
orchestra, composed of three mem
bers. Messrs. Henz, Mease and
Shearer furnished lively string mu
sic. Mrs. J. R. Westaby rendered a
well applauded solo member with
Miss Lila Palmer as accompanist.
The conclusion of the day's events
came when four hundred people en
joyed a midnight lunch.
The visitors at the meeting just
closed are grateful to local members
for the hospitality afforded them dur
ing their stay In the city.
—o
PASSED AWAY AFTESft All B#L
BHM8 OF SEVERAL DAYS OS*
PNEUMONIA.
Mrs. Fred Uthe. aged 37 yetEB, of
Lakeview township, died at 3:35 a.
m. today of penumonia after an ill
ness of a week or more. Deceased
ic survived by husband and four
young children, Mary, Adolph, George
and Anna. Also father, John Heid
enshield, of LeMars, la., two sisters,
Mrs. Burt Uthe and Miss Mary Heid
enshield, of Lake county an.d three
brothers, Chas. Heidenshield. of Lake
county, and William and Samuel, of
LeMars.
The funeral services will be held
from the Methodist church in this
city, but the date and the place of
burial has not been decided upon,
awaiting the arrival of the father.
The family have resided in this
county since 1909, coming here from
Plymouth county, Iowa. For several
years they resided on a«rented farm,
but two years ago Mr. Uthe purchas
ed a farm and is only now completing
his building improvements.
John Heidenshield, father of Mrs.
Cthe, and son, Samuel arrived this
afternoon from LeMars. The funeral
will be held from the house at 2:30
'o'clock and from the M. E. church at
3 o'clock. Sunday afternoon. Burial
in Graceland cemetery.
o
Pass Street Car
Control Bill
St. Paul. April 14.—The state sen
ate today repassed the street car con
trol bill giving the railroad ware
house commission power to fix street
car fares in Minnesota. The bill now
goes to Governor Preufc
Farm Machinery
Prices Slashed
Chicago, 111., April 14.—The first
effect of the slash in steel prices was
felt here today when a straight ten
per cent cut in prices on farm ma-
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY, APRIL 14,1921.
•hinery in ^hich steel is used wa.s
announced 1)5 the International Ha
vester Co. The reduction applies
chiefly to harvesting machinery, cov
e ring grail* binders, shockers, rea
pers, mowers, hayrakes, side delivery
i ikes, tenders, loaders, corn binders,
^uskers, pickers and silo fillers. A
reduction of ten per cent in prices
on all farm machinery composed prin
cipally of wood and iron was an
nounced last month by the Harvester
cutufNtay.
BILLS PLENTIFUL
IS IE HOUSE
AIMED lO COVKft IMPORTANT
NATIONAL PROBLEMS.
Washington, D. C., April 14.—Bill
designer to cover some of the more
important problems before congress
were
introduced today in
the
house.
They included the emergency tariff,
repeal of some war taxes and propos
als for new ones, soldier bonus and
soldier relief, federal budget, restric
tion no immigration and federal road
building.
While the "five way" plan of vet
eran organizations for deferred com
pensation to the ex-service tyen be
came house 4iU No. 1, the tax ques
tion was foremost. Representative
Longworth, of Ohio, proposed repeal
of excess profits and war profits tax
ation. The suggestion was repeated
by Representative Baeharaeh. of New
Jersey, and Molt, ui New York, who
proposed imposition of groBS sales
t&xeb at I per cent. The Bacharach
mea~uie iidu suggested reduction of
normal iucoiue rates to per
cent, and application ou the surtax to
incomes above $7,000, with a maxi
mum rate of 40 per cent.
Chairman Fordney, of the ways
and means committee, presenting th^
service men's proposal, which provid
es for alternatives between cash pay
ments, and settlement, insurance, vo
cational education and home build
ing, left out taxation proposals, but
Representative Gallivan, of Massa
chusetts, put in a duplicate of the
bill as it passed the house last sea^
sion.
Representative Sweet, republican,
of Iowa, introduced a bill to consoli
date all boards and bureaus having
to do with soldier rehabilitation, and
Representative Fess, republican, of
Ohio, suggested exemption from in
come taxes of all payments to veter
ans undergoing \ocational training.
Immigration restrictions, decided
on by the last congress in enacting a
bill limiting annual entrance of
aliens to 3 per cent of the total resi
dent of each nationality as found by
iii»- lylu census, was proposed by
Chairman Johnson, of the immigra
tion committee. His bill duplicated
that which President Wilson gave
a pocket veto.
Representative Blanton, democrat,
of Texas, whose battles with his as
sociates in congress have attracted
attention, suggested that congress be
reduced from 435 members to 304,
and he reapportioned according to the
1U20 census, but would provide for
holding the membership to its pres
ent limit.
Mr.
Blanton also propos­
ed elimination of the travel allow
ance of 20 cents a mile for members
and substituting a payment of actu
al expenses to be made out on sworn
•ouchers.
Representative Young, republican,
of North Dakota, introduced the
emergency agricultural tariff as it
passed in February. Its effective
period was fixed as six months after
enactment instead of ten, as in the
vetoed measure of the last session.
Chairman Kahn, of the military
affairs committee, again proposed
separate air corps under a new ex
ecutive bureau, to control military
aviation, and a separate proposal for
federal regulation of civilian aviation
to accompany it.
Chairman Good, of the appropria
tions committee, introduced the fed
eral budget bill, another vetoed meas
ure.
Abolition of the railroad labor
board and repeal of sections of the
transportation act under which It
•operates was proposed by Represent
atives Tincher, republican, of Kan
sas. His bill would empower the in
terstate commerce commission to per
form functions now assigned to the
beard.
Fire Starts In
Newspaper Office
Johnstows, Pa., April 14.—Fire
threatened destruction of block of
buildings in the center of the busi
ness district. All fire companies
were called. Two men were over
come. The fire started in tile office
of the Morning Ledger.
E
BRADSTREETS WEEKLY REVIEW
OF INDUSTRIAL AND COM-
MER4 IAL SITUATION SHOWS
BB'ROVEME**..
New York, April 14.—Trade and
industry do not reflect any very
arked changes from recent reports,
it. there are enough signs of im
provement in basic conditions to rob
the general showing of some of its
hitherto rather depressing atmos
phere, according to this week's re
view of trade by Bradstreet's.
Cool weather, bad roads, cauttoto,
even timid, buying and reduced pur
chasing power in industrial and agri
cultural regions, the latter the resuli
of lessened earnings and low prices,
keep trade distribution down to the
barely fair point.
Crop reports ar» favorable. Dam
age by the recent freeze in winter
wheat is reported as negligible. Hes
sian fly is prevalent in Indiana. Illin
ois and Michigan. Seeding of spring
wheat is about completed in Iowa,
well along in Minnesota and South
Dakota, and starting in North Da
kota. Indications point to a reduced
acreage.
Corn planting is progreasing in
the southern and southwestern states,
and corn is being cultivated in south
Texas.
Traffic on the western railroads in
T!
1
March was 15 to 30 per cent below
that of last year. Merchandise lead
mgs are irown to be better than any
other class with tne exception of
grain. Traffic officials atrnbute this
to the steady buying of distributors
throughout ttM* eeuniry fur imme-i
diate shipment.
LAST WORM OF THE UTK FOR­
MER GERMAN EMPREflfc
Berlin, April 14.—"I cannot bear
to leave you all alone. What wiii
become of you?"
These were the last trembling
words of the former German empr^s
Augusta Victoria. A moment la
ter her heart missed and, while fo
mer Kaiser Wilhelm watched, a ph
sician gave her an injection in tli•
arm in an attempt to revive her, but
the late German kaiserin did not r
cowr consciousness a^ain. This is
description of the death scene,
More frequently she told her hus
band that the reason she did not gi
up and die sooner was because aft
could not bear to think of leaving
him alone. This thought obsessed
her.
Daily Market Report
Huflspolto Grain
Minneapolis, April 14.—Corn—
Dead easier, prices lower com
pared with futures. No. 3 yellow
closed at 46 and 47c No. 3 mlxe!
at 43 and 45c.
Oats.—Firm, No. 3 whites 1 and
I%c over May offerings small. No.
3 whites closed at 30 and 31c, No.
4 whites at 27^ and 28 ^c.
Rye.—Weak, and premiums and
5c lower, No. 2 mainly 6c over May
demand dull. No. 2 rye closed at
$1.18% and $1.19%.
Barley.—Market 1 and 2c lower,
demand quiet. Prices closed at 4 2
and 82 c.
Stout Otfcy live itwrlr.
Sioux City, April 14.—Top ftflgs
ranged from $7.35 to $8.30.
5
a
ac­
cording to a- rogal persona who ar
rived in Berlin this morn
in* fnm
Doom.
The former kaiser spent a grea
part of the days and nights at th
e s i e o i s w i e a n e i s
administered the medicines prescrih
ed for her. The former kaiser and
kaiserin held each other's hands for
hours at a time, and the kaiser i
died clasping him. When Wiihekn
realized that the end had come he im
mediately burst out crying, in which
he was joined by his son. Prince
Adalbert.
It is declared that homesickness
was and additional cause of the ka.
serin's death. The last few days 8h»
is reported to have said
"Why must I never see my fcoti:
again?"
I
.j!
r«L 1* &
You should be a* quick as others in
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bank acotmt majreljahlp hank where
your
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEED
UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK
Madi*mtv ^onth Dakota
There isn't one aingle particular pertaining to the banking
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to aerrt
OUR ABILITY AND WILLINGNESS
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WE INVITE YOU
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FLL£f?4t. *£SE»vE
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THE OLDEST BAMK list L. A
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Makers of High Grade Butter
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
PHONE 2341 MADISON, & D.
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East River Soft Coal Oak and Maple Wood
Sterling Egg Scranton Hard Coal
Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.
Phone 2343 L. H. BL.AGEN, Agent
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PIIONC 2338
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V, i. .'$1-2?
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