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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, June 28, 1921, Image 1

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BIG CUT IN
IDE EXP ES
ttOVFKNME.N*
NS A BILLIOV
tXHXAK «v*1 THIS YEAR.
Washington, xne 28.—A billion
dollar cut in government expendi
tures during the year beginning July
1st. Was the hope of the Harding
administration today. Congress has
appropriated about four billions for
the year beginning July 1st by put-,
ting the new federal budget system
into operation at once. The admin
istration hopes to make 25 per cen
savings plans which will be out lined
at big meeting of all department* to
morrow.
Washington, June 28.—House re
publican leaders have decided to sup
port the Borah disarmament resolu
tion, it developed today. This vir
tually assures prompt enactment o£
the proposal for a disarmament con
ference between the United States,
Great Britain and Japan.
Washington, June 28.—The Demp-,
aey-Car pen tier fight will be held un
der a hot sun unless all weather
signs fail, the weather bureau stated,
Present indications point to a clear
hot day at Jersey ^Jity Saturday.
Jersey City, June 28.—An attempt
to stop the Bemppey Car pent i»-r fight.
here Saturday was made in Chan
eery
court ht?re today. Robert Wat
son, president of the International
Reform league, accompanied by
counsel and five local clergymen,
asked vice chancellor Stevenson to
issue an order directing Tex Rickard
and other promoters of the fight to
show cause why an injunction should
not be issued against it.
The S
tiUman
Divorce Case
Yonkers, New York, June 28.—A
sabpoena haw been issued for James
A~-StiiUiiaA- to appear in «urt at
Poughkeepsie at lUiUo tomorrow
when secret hearings in his divorce
suit will be resumed, it was learned
today DetectivHs and counsel spent
most of th enight searching for Still
man and were still searching today.
UDflElS MEASURE
SECRETARY ITES SHIPPING
BOARD A& TERRIBLE EXAM­
PLE OF GOVERNMENT FAIL.
URE.
Washington, D. C., June 28.—
Secretary of Commerce Hoover op
posed the Norris bill authorizing the
formation of a IIOO.OOO.OUO corpor
ation for the financing and market
ing of exports of farm products to
day before the senate committee on
agriculture. Mr. Hoover said that
while he sympathized with the pur
pose of the measure, he hesitated
"to suggest or approve any plan
that would mvoive the government
further in any understanding whicn
might result in failure, and which
should be left to private business."
Mr. Hoover suggested, however,
that it might be reasibie to broaden,
the ^cupe of the war finance corpor
ation somewhat. Under the terms
of the Norris bill the proposed agri
cultural export corporation not only
would aid in financing exports, but
would act aa a selling agency, find
ing markets for farm products
abroad.
The secretary of commence cited
the shipping board as "a terrible ex
ample of the failure of attempted
government operation.'' He said that
work of the nature proposed should
be left to private business aa much
aa possible.
^One of the chfef difficulties In
making such a corporation a success.
Mr. Hoover said, was the problem
of binding men to take charge of
who had had sufficient business ex
perience. He said that a man capable
of earning $100,000 a year in pri
vate business should be in charge
of such corporation in order to in
sure its success.
**It is hard to indoce a man cap
able of earning a salary of $100,000
a year to make the personal sacri
fice necessary n order to direct the
activities of a ~'ov«-rnment enterprise
siseh as is proposed here," «aui Mr
Haswsr. te eaat to secure the
services of a $5,000 a year mau, but
hard to get one of the other kind."
Mr. Hoover said that a man like
Julius H. Barnes, former United
States wheat 4irector, would be
needed in order to make the corpor
ation a success:
Aviators Resume
Their Journey!
Fort Bliss. Texas, June 28.—David
Davis and Eric Sprinter, aviators,
who were forced to land here late
yesterday on a transcontinental
flight from Riverside. California, to
New oYrk. resumed their journey at
5 o'clock this morning.
STRIKE
HEAVY REFERENDUM VOTE
WMM *TT.
Chicago, June 28.—A strike of
railroad workers loomed today when
it became known that shop employe?*
CONGRESS HELD AT MITCHELL
was «rea srrrrss—tahb
STAND IN RESOLUTION^
Mitchell. June js.—Adjourning
its second annual convention the
South Dakota Farm Women's con
gress adopted the following resolu
tions:
"We favor the legislation and eco
nomic organizations that will greatly
reduce the spread in price between
that realized by the producer of
farm products and that paid by the
ultimate consumer.
We favor legitimate co-operative
organizations for the fanner for both
buying and selling.
We urge upon the federal govern
ment some kind of supervision and
regulation of the coal mining indus
try whereby the people of South Da
kota may secure coal at more reason
able rates.
1
over the country had overwhelming-,
ly vott-d io reject the 12 per cent
wajfe cut ordered by the United
States railroad labor board July 1.
The result of the referendum taken
among the shop men and forwarded
here to national head«4uarters of the
railroad department of the Ameri
can federation of labor showed 48,-
000 w*r- for the decrease while
325.000 were against it. The decid-!
ed opposition of shop employes came
as a big surprise to labor leaders
who belk*v»-d the cut would be ac
cepted by a small margin. The pro
position may be put to a strike Tote
of all rail brotherhoods.
•V
We ask the state fair board to
elude concessions from the women
building and give the space to exhi
bits such as model kitchens, labor
saving devices and home convenienc
es we further ask that as soon as
possible they rut down the premiums
offered for fancy work and increase
those for practical home work.
nenNs
We urge the construction of a
great waterway route to the ocean
by way of the Great Lakes and* the
St. Lawrence river.
We urge on congress the passage
of the Sterling-Towner bill and the
Sheppard-Towner bill.
We favor government regulation
of the packing industry.
We urge that farm women unite
to create a larger program of social
activities for the young people of
the rural communities.
In speaking on styles at the con
gress, Miss Selma Rengstad. of the
home demonstration department of
the state agricultural college, said:
"W*hen nature created the ele
phant she dressed him in neutral
colors, but when nature created the
butterfly she used all the bright col
ors of the rainbow. Large women
should remember this in their se
lection of colors. It takes the small,
slender woman to wear bright col
ors."
Bptuk Coal
Strike Settled
London. June 28.—"Hie British
mitt strike has been settled, the!
miners accepting the government's
terms. Work in the cogl pits, idle
almost three months, w
ed imm?6fat«4y
P1] LIG SCHOOtH
LECTURES BY DR. SXEIUK1 AT
THE NORMAL SI"MAIKK
SCHOOL.
Dr. Sbttdden, of Columbia
In the field of modern languages
Dr. Snedden believed that loo much
work is being done by most stu
dents. He believes that there should
certainly be some foreign language
work given, but only to students who
expect to do some thing with it in
later life. The effort put on languag
es for their cultural and appreciative
value could much more profitally be
put into something els*-. Everyone
can not be a specialist along every
line so the plan is to pick out the
specialists for their particular work.
In the general cultural side we need
to put our effort where it will do
uiost good instead of blindly follow
ing the traditional methods unlesB
we are sure thai they are still the
beet.
Or. flaedden repeatedly stated
that the work along this new line
iB not at all settled and as yet few
set laws can be laid down.
BLUE LAW ACTS
SOUTH DAKOTA SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTISTS (. ON RECOUP
ON SABBATH BILLS. i
Watertown, June 28.—The South
Dakota conference of the Seventh
Day Adventists has gone on record
on some of the problems of the day
by adopting the following resolu
tions:
Whereat,
there la a nationwide ef­
fort being put forth by certain reli
gious organizations to Puritanize
America, and to revive the Sunday
"blue law#* of colonial times when
the church and state were united,
therefore be it
Resolved, that we, the members
of the South Dakota Conference of
Seventh Day Adventists. in mass
meeting assembled at the camp meet
ing at Huron. June 9-10. do herebv
petition the United States congress
not to pass "any of the pending com
pulsory Sunday observance bills. We
are opposed to the Sunday "blue
laws" because they are religious in
character and contrary to the gen
ius of the American system of gov
ernment in violation of the Ameri
can principles of the separation of
church and state, destructive of the
first amendment of the federal con
stitution, opposed to the best inter
ests of both church and state, and.
above all. they are manifestly un
American, un-Christian, unconstitu
tional, partial, and a piece of class
legislation, favoring certain sects and
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 192J.
vat-
versitv, is givinu a series of lectures
to the summer school students of the
normal on the efficiency of our pub
lic schools. According to Dr. Sned
den there are certainly many ways
in which our present school system
can be made to give better returns
than we have bet-n getting for the
enormous amount of money that
have been put into them. The old
idea that the school was primarily
a place of strict discipline, a place of
work and not hint else, is parsing out
of existence. The new view is that
the school has a dual purpose: To
fit the student for future living and
to render him appreciative of the
rtght sort of 'hings. There are two
kinds of studies whtch will help to
carry out this dual purpose: The
projective, i. e. those which fit the
student for future work, reading,
writing etc. and the appreciative
or literature, music, etc. At pres
ent the school is not fulfilling thig
double requirement. The subjects
which should be given to fit the
student for life are not given so
much with the vi^w of giving .the
student exactly what he is actually
going to need, but rather of giving
him what has always been given in
the past. For instance in United
States History, the student is given
the details of the period of coloniza
tion and of the military campaigns,
etc., instead of haying his attention
focused on the recent problems, the
problenm which he must know
something of in order to be a good
citizen. In the other field it is
rather hard to convince people that
the school was ntended heip peo
ple in the appreciative of good mu
sic etc. Dr. Snedden said that there
was certainly a need for discipline
in school, but that it was rather a
means to an end than the nd itself.
discounting irthali under durfba oft
civil law.
Religious legislation, unchecked,
knows so limitations and no mercy.
The last step, in tha direction is the
Inquisition, with
ill
the horrors that
bigots can invent. It is, therefore,
necessary that we take alarm and
arise our voices in protest against
the first step heading us in that di
rection and the first encroachments
upon liberties. God made the con
science free in the realm of religion
and no men have a right to enslave
it.
Civil laws and carnal weapons
were not employed by Christ to ad
vance His cause. The church should
employ only sospel means to ad
vance the cause of religion.
Let America be the home of free
men, an asylum for the oppressed,
the dispenser of equal justice the de
fender of the individual conscience
and the cradle of liberty for all men
of every religion and no religion as
long as they do not entrench upon
the same and equal privileges and
rights of their fellowmen.
o
EVIDENCE OF BUSS i
P1CY WOLDS'
r. S. OFFICIALS RECEIVE
TAILED
DE­
ACtXH
NT OF VES-
OOMFCrtCATMNf.
Washington, Jane tt.—The tinsosy
ihat bol?hevik bur-^aneer.?. agents. or
sympathizers wei*e responsible for the
disappearance of more than 2U mer
chant ships off the Virginia and
Carolina coasts during the last six
months, received impetus when offi
cials came into possession of a de
tailed official account of the seizure
of the Cuxhaven fishing steamer,
Senator Schroeder. by a mutinous
crew who confiscated tfte vessel in
the name of the soviet government.
After the capta n and officers had
been overpowered and locked up. the
ringleader of the mutineers, one
Knuefken. aided by bolshevik agents,
ran th« ship nto 'he port of Mur
mansk. Here Knuefken left the ship
and made his wav back to Hamburg,
where he was convicted of mut!ny
and ship stealing and sentenced to
five years in the penitentiary.
Meanwhile the members of the
crew who had remained with the
Senator Schroeder tired of life among
the Huviets and plotted to steal the
ship and return to Cuxhaven Th«-y
overpowered their new officers and
took the Senator Schroeder back to
Cuxhaven, where they were arrested
and tried.
This report of mutlay and piracy
gave a new lease of life to the be
lief expressed by Secretary of Com
merce Herbert Hoover that tl|e un
usual loss o fships during the last
year must be ascribed to the ac
tions of bolshvil: crews.
o
Award Pnflock
Sum Of $15,000
WatertovB, June 28.—That Stan
ley Pollock is en'itled to receive dam
ages of $ 15,000 from the Minneapo
lis & St. Louis ra:!road for the in
juries he has sustained several years
ago when a switch engine backed
over an ash pit :a which Toilock was
working and cut off his left fore
arm and all but the first finger and
thumb of his right hand, is the deci
sion of the South Dakota supreme
court on the second appeal by the
railroad company from the verdict
returned from the circuit court here.
The supreme court handed down
the opinion in the last appeal con
firming the circuit court verdict for
a judgment of $15,000.
In the first trial of the ca«e here,
Pollock was awarded judgment of
$30,000 but the railroad company ap
pealed and '.he supreme court held
with the appealant in ruling that Pol
lock was not. an employe buL working
for an independent coatrsetor io re
moving the ashes.
The second suit was rried with Pol
lock's attorneys maintaining that Pol
lock was rightfully on the railroad
company's property and that he was
injured by reason of carelessness
and neglv-ct. of the company.
The case has been pending in the
courts since a short liuxu after Pol
lock's injury.
Negotiations Betwee*
Britain and Ireland
London. June 28.—Premier Lloyd
George today awaited President De
VaJeras absent to a conference on the
Irinh peace. The British cabinet will
meet tomorrow and it was assumed
it will then receive Ulster's accept
ance of the premier's bid of peace.
mimri
WAS APTI RKD YEARS AGO
WHEN SHE WAS A INMOST
BABE.
Sons Falls, June St.—Captured
by a band of Sioux Indians when she
was 3 years old, kept in captivity, and
finally marrying into the tribe, is the
interesting record of Mrs. Red Fox,
a white woman who was brought to
the attention of the federal authori
ties when she charged an Indian had
attempted to assault her. Mr&. Red
Fox is now 83 years old, has been in
the tribe for 80 years* and speaks
no language but the Sioux rllalect.
Nothing is known of her parent
age. She iB simply a lost baby girl,
who has never been returned to her
parents. Perhaps her parents were
massacred in the raid in which aha
was taken captive.
The case in which she is now
In­
volved. arose near Dupre«. James
Buck Elk Thunder was seen at the
home of Mrs. Red Fox by her son-in
law. Mrs. Red Fox alleges that he
returned later and assaulted her.
The prisoner was taken to Aber
deen, where he waived preliminary
examination, and will wait for the
term to open in federal court. Elk
Thunder has previously served a
year in the penitentiary on a ii%tttft
charge.
Millers Worrp
Of Housewives
Pi4M June 28.—Local fapmrs
from every section of the state report
a "plague of millers," as the grey
moths which are swarming evidently
in all parts of the state are called.
These pests crawl into houses
through crevices and cracks suppos
ed to be too close to allow any such
invasion, and while they are not
much in evidence in the day time,
the turning on of a light means
that
they come out in swarms from every
nook and corner of the roows where
they have remained hidden for th*
day. k
The Methods of getting rid of
them are the main dlBCuesioa of wo
men when they gather together these
days.
n
Old Indian Fighter
Visits Battlefield
Deadwood, Jnne 28.—Joha Burrl.
of Whitewood. one of the few re-]
maining pioneer Indian fighters ofj
a half a century ago, was among
those who on Saturday, June 25, wit
nessed the reproduction of the Cus
ter battle on the hiBtosiC old battle
field on the Little Big Horn river, in
southern Montana.
Mr Burn was a member of Cua
ter'3 famous 7th cavalry. He waa^in
the Yellowstone expedition in 1873.,
during which there were four
garments with the Indians, one being s
with Sitting Bull, who led the Sioux S
who *ubnequently surrounded and S
Daily
r\
tftaerre
LmrB"dHo™ PHONE 2341
Market Report
JuuiHxpom unun mrirt
Minneapolis. June 28.—Corn.—
Demand from --levator interests con
tinued fair to good. Shipping de
mand moderate. No. 3 yellow clos
ed at 47 and 4Ae No. S mixed at
44 and 45c.
Oats.—Elevator bnyinc strong
and liberal receipts absorbed at firm MM
prices. No. 3 whites closed at &3
and 3374c No. 4 whites at 307* i
and 3 2
74c.
Rye.—Slav millisig and shipping
interests continued. Premiums un-|5E
rhantjed. No. 3 rye closed at S1.15)S
and $1.17.
Barley.—-Outlet less broad and S
market undertone weakened* owing'S
to large receipts. Prices tisesd at
44 and 60c.
Sioox City live Btnch.
Moux Clyt, Jane 28.—The quality
of hogs was fairly good and included
a healthy showing of the better 5
kinds. Tops went to $8
.35, while-5
the bulk of the aslse maged from Ls
$7 85 and $8.95. 5
1876. S
Mr. Burri's enlistment expired on i|(.lilllllllllllliaillllillilillilllitlllilltlillllllllltlMII1Mlhlilliiillllliill!lllltlllilllif»4M
March 13. 187«. and to this he
—a
owes it that he now alive. Had
it not been so he would have been
with those killed on the Little Big
Horn three months later. He went
to St. Louis to visit his folks. aBd
returned and reenlisted is Ai
cavalry.
sparkling Gem i
Raqi BivMr
'U'*'1
mm
BAKKINC3
IN SAFETY UM
•&'fi 4
You should Ue as quick as other* ir
learning the advantages of having a
bank account a reliable bank wkere
jrour i
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEE®
UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK
There fen't one viiigfo particular pertaining to tike hanking
business in which this bank is not prepared to fire yw the
acme of good service.
OUR ABILITY AND WILLINGNESS
job
ft
THE: oldest BJ*MK
Wf-f"
represents your opportunity*
WE INVITE YOU
To start your account here and grow with ua.
The start once made, your growth in asnarei.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
^EDERA.1. "StStm
MADISON, S.
/A/
iiiiiiinwiimiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiitiniiiiiiininiiinininiitnninitiiiiimf itr
The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
Makers of High Grade Butter
mm
L. A HE COUM TY
iviaiiiiiactiirgiw w s
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks I
I
Highest Market Pike Paid for Cream jS
THE TEST OF ALL
Cast River V Soft Coal Oak and Maple Wood
Sterling Eg Scrartor Hard CcaJ
Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.
Phone 2343 L» H» BLAGEN. Agent
1 COAL COAL 1
Large and Small Briquets
Kentucky Lump Splint Lump
Cote
W. KETCHAM &
PHONE 2338
MADISON. S. tt.
Pine Kindling
S
i
•,w

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