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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, June 29, 1921, Image 1

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TIFT TO BE
CHIEF JUSTICE
PRESIDENT HARf
Sii
HAS M£»
1IK.D ON Hth APPOINT-
MENT.
Washington, June 29.—Announce­|
ment of the appointment of William
Howard Taft to be chief justice of
the United States supreme court
j/iobably
will
be made shortly,
it
was learned. President Hardin?
has practically decided on his ap
pointment, it was said.
million
dollars.
Washington, June 29.—Rumors
that Captain Edward L. Beach was
denied promotion to rear admiral
because of the part he played in de
feating the one hundred million dol
lar naval Station project at Alameda,
Calif., were due to be aired in the
senate today. Senator King said he
would
Call up the resolution
quiry.
E N
of in­
Washington, June 29.—Prohibi
tion Commissioner Haynes today an
nounced plans for reorganization of
the flying squadron of prohibition
detectives to cover the entire United
States under his personal direction.
At the same time he announced plans
for reorgantaaiten of the entire de
partment.
HARDING NAMES J. RAYMOND
TO BE CONTROLLER
GENERAL.
Washington, D. C.. June 29.—J.
Raymond McCarl, of McCook, Neb.,
secretary of the republican congres
sional Campaign committee, was
nominated today by President Hard
ing to be controller general of the
United States, a position created by
the new budget law which becomes
effective Friday.
Mr. McCarl is about
40
and has been secretary
years old
of
the con­
gressional committee for about three
years. He is a graduate of the Uni
versity of Nebraska law school and
was secretary to Senator Norris, re
publican, of Nebraska, for a number
of years.
As controller general, Mr. McCarl
will have charge of government fi
nances, expenditures of appropria
tions, auditing of all expenditures,
sett lenient and adjustment of claims
of and against the government and
management of all fiscal affairs with
the exception only of postal accounts,
which are to be under a special con
troller of the postoffice department
also created by the new law.
Many government activities will
be coordinated under the controller.
He will inherit, the duties, personnel
staff, documents and offices of the
controller of the treasury, whose po
sition and those of six auditors for
various government departments are
abolished by the new act.
The controller's term of office is
fifteen years and he is made inelig
ible for re-appointment. His salary
will be $10,000 ayear a year and he
will be subject to appointment. His
salary will be subject removal for
improper conduct, by joint resolu
tion of congress requiring the presi
dent'* approval.
Tropical Storm
Is Approactrfng
Houston, Texas, June 29.—Fall
ing barometers at Southern Texas
points Mrljr today Indicated that a
tropical storm of unknown intensity
is approaching the coast. The
weather bureau believing the storm
will hit near the mouth of the Rio
Grande has warned residents of Pa
dre island to go inland. The island
was unundated by a storm last week.
Lady Randolph
Churchill Dies
London, June 29.—Lady Ran
Uolph Churchill died here today. She
I recently submitted to an operation in
which a foot was amputated. She was
a daughter
of
1
Washington, June 29.—Failure to
agree on duties to be laid oil chem
icals today held up the republican
tariff bill. The house ways and
means committee had, hoped to con
clude six weeks of tariff framing by
introducing a bill when the house
met today. The committee met early
today, however, and continued
debate
on the chemicals schedule.
Washington, June 29.—More than
one
billion dollars is due
the
United
States as interest on money loaned
to foreign governments. Secretary
Mellon today told the senate finance
committee. A total of four hundred
Fifty. One million in interest has
been paid on more than ten billion
dollars loaned, he said. Repayments
on principal to date total one hun
dred sixty-two
Leonard Jerome,
Huron, June 29.—Farm produc
tion costs in 1921,
from
The Stillmans
Meet In Court
Pattghkeepaie, June 2i.—James A.
Stillman met
hia
court
wife face
vorce scandal started.
room.
ESSI
of
New York, and a sister of Clare Jer-
ome who also married an English
man. The sisters were famous for
their
beauty.
CROP COSTS ARE
ARM Kits mi, SIFTER FROM
HEAVY LOSSES DUE TO LAST
Y EAR'S PRICES.
rough ap­
proximations now available, are
from 50 to 100 per cent above pres
ent farm prices, in spite of the fact
that these coels are considerably be
lo wthose of last year. This state
ment is made by M. R. Benedict, sec
retary of the South Dakota farm bu
reau federation. Mr. Benedict says:
"While it is too early to make any
accurate estimate of production costs
Tor t^is year, as this will depend
largely upon the yield per acre, it is
evident that the cost of growing
corn and marketing will range from
50 to 75 cents per bushel or higher
throughout most of ^outh Dakota
this year. This is more than twice
the present price received by the
farmer.
"Farmers are still suffer ins from
the heavy losses due to last year's
high production costs and low prices.
This proceps of selling products at
one-fourth to one-half their produc
tion costs cannot go on indefinitely,
and unless means can be found
whereby farmers can secure at least
average production costs, many far
mers will be forced into bankruptcy
this coming year.
"Only very good yields can bring
he cost of wheat production down
o $2 per bushel this year. Barley
and hay will both cost, even at the
present lower wages for farm labor,
more than the present prices of these
products.
"We
believe that }t is better for
the farmer to have knowledge of ap
proximate costs early in the season
or even at planting time in order
that he may base his actions on these
probable costs than to have detailed
costs after the crop has left his
hands.
"It
will require time and careful
development of marketing machin
ery before farmers can make sure
of
securing a profit over production
costs as an average over a period of
years.
to face
today for the first time since
the
di­
The
was a glance
million­
aire financier sat in an ante room
waiting^ to be called to the witness
stand when his wife passed.
There
of
Stillman patted
recognition. Mrs.
yuickly
into
the
Officials Of Farm
Organizations Confer
St. Paul, June 29.—Minnesota
Farm
Bureau federation. Equity
Co-
i
operative Exchange and United.1
Grain Growers officials were confer-'
ring here today on differences
over
authority in farmers' problems.
Peace Proposal
Strikes A Snagj
London, June 29.—Premier Lloyd
George's Irish peace proposal struck
its first snag today, when Sir James
Craig, Ulster premier, declined to'
meet with president De Valera in a!
preliminary conference De Valera
had asked Craig and other Ulster
leaders to meet him in Dublin Mon
day to discuss his answer as spokes
man for the Irish. mUion when he
IMeta
Lloyd Georgfu
CEEEMOfllES TOU
FATHRR OLAREXfR I. GARRY
CELEBRATES FIRST MASS AT
ST. THOMAS.
At 10 o'clock this morning, in the
presence of a gathering which filled
St. Thomas church to its capacity,
Father Clarence I. Garry celebrated
his first mass. He was assisted by
Father Flynn, who acted as assist
ant priest and Fathers Conley and
Iioche, who performed the duties of
deacon and sub-deacon, respectively.
The ceremonies carried an air of ex
treme impressiveness and pathos in
view of the fact that Father Flynn,
n the fortieth anniversary of his
rdination, was able to participate in
vhe celebration of the first mass of
Father Garry, the third young man
to enter the priesthood from this
parish. In a short but touching ser
mon, Father Flynn emphasized the
creat responsibilities which rest up
on the shoulders of a young man
entering the priesthood and also ex
pressed his (insurmountable joy in
the fact that three young men whom
he baptized lia\e not hesitated in as
suming these responsibilities.
Among the visiting priests Who
were present at the mass this morn
ing were Fathers Stecher of Howard,
Lahecka of De Sniet, Duffey of
Woonsocket, Auer of Artesian, Ryan
of Parker, Lennon of Mobridge, Bir
kel of of Hunt inter, Kielty of Cole
man, Hoerner, O'Connor and Conley
of Sioux Falls. Mr. Iv«® of Boone,
la., and Mr. McKenna •'""x City
who are stundents in -sem
inary, and Michael Roche o* this
city, who is a student in St. John
seminary at Collegeville, Minn., jlso
assisted in the" mass. Among the
out of town relatives of Father Garry
who were present were: Mr. and
Mrs. C. E. Carney of Lawton, Okla.,
J. D. Neville of St. Paul and Mr. and
Mrs. J. J. McGrane of Sioux City.
Immediately following the mass,
the Ladies Altar society served an
elaborate banquet to Fathers Flynn
and Garry, Father Garry's relatives
and the visiting priests, and this aft
ernoon the members of the congrega
tion extended their congratulations
at a reception
held
ia
auditorium.
the high acho
EXPEDITION COST CLINTON, IA.,
185,OOO—ENTERTAINED 111
HOCTH DAKOTA.
Kimball, June 29.—The large del
egation of Boy Scouts traveling in
.automobiles from Clinton, la., pass
ed through here Saturday. The dele
cation were traveling in three sec
tions and Col. M. L. Shade, of the
state highway commission, acted as
escort.
The executive personnel consisted
of the following: T. I. McLane, di
rector of scouting Rev.
J.
rner, chaplain Father J.
F. L. Holleran, a prominent attor
ney of Clinton, whose son is among
tb e scouts, and who accompanied him
to Chamberlain, Saturday stated it
cost business men $125,000 to equip
tke boy scouts. Everything is fur
nished in meals fro mtheir auto truck
cooking establishment.
A
The boys were given
banker
has charge of the boys' money who
are only allowed to draw 25 cent*
per day.
a
royal
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29,1921.
en­
tertainment at Chamberlain Satur
day and an entertainment also is
ex
pected to be given by the Indiatta
from the Crow Creek Reservation.
Deadwood, has raised $7,500
to
entertain the delegation, where they
will remain several days. Yellow
stone pa*k witt b*
tiwbr
ation.
Birdmen
Non-Stop Flight
El
Paso, Texaa, June ©Mid
Davis and Eric Springer who at
tempted a non-stop» fliuht from Ri\
erside, California to New Yorfc hop
ped off here early today, intending
to make the rest of the way without
a
stop in 24 houis.
D3C1S1GE
IT
H19A» OF ALLIED MtltWAL AS
SOCIATION OF AMERICA AP­
PEALS TO FRATERNITY FOR
ACTION.
Atlantic City, Ntl., June 29.—The
doctors of the coahtry were called
upon today to unite in an effort to
liquor salesmen
SIEITS
and
drug stores as saloons.
"From general observation the
law has been a curse to our country.
It has taken away pure liquor and
beer and has substituted poison and
deleterious liquors. It is causing
gambling
and
Immorality
in
the
homes. It is causing death after
death of the innocent public. It
is
causing blindness by the score. Are
the physicians going to make
a stand
for the good of the public health or
are we going to sit quietly and suck
our thumbs? We must decide which
is the greater evil from a m^ieal
standpoint: Prohibition or home
brew."
SUPPOSED
OSE OP "DROWNED" BOTH GIVES
A GLIMPSE OF FUTURE WORLD
AFTER RECOVERY.
Chicago, June 29.—Roland Abey,
20 years of age,
a
junior at North­
western university, was yesterday
pronounced dead by Capt. Carland,
of the United States coast guards.
Thomas Leonard* who was with Ab
ey when their canoe capsized, alw
was given up for dead, but both were
revived after long effort. Today
young Abey sat-up, very much alive,!
and related his weird experiences
during the forty-five minutes life
savers were working over him with
pulmotors.
There is some sort
S. Lea­
A.
Murray,
chaplain Dr. E. L. Martindale and
Dr. C. S. Chase, physicians Mrs.
C\ Shigley, nurse Wm. Purcell, di
rector of drill C. I. Newlin, director
of recreation C. P. Huey, director of
morale John Sheppard, band mas
ter Otto Korn, business manager
Edward Beguhn, secretary W. S.
Jacobsen, treasurer Stewart Towle,
master of transportation Bert Nash,
superintendent of convoy Frank
Finch, superintendent of mechanics
j. C. Van Hul, Jr., publicity direc
tor C. A. Novotny, photographer
Don Bailey, wireless operator, O. O.
Pierce, scout executive, and W. W.
Blakley, assistant scout executive.
of
life after
what we call death," said Abey. "I
can no longer doubt it after my ex
periences. If you can imagine a
world filled with the most gorgeous
daubs of futuristic colors—purples
and golds and crimsons—a world
peopled by a fantastic variety
of
ings, resembling more nearly than
anything else Russian ballet dancers,
you will have some idea of the here
after which I experienced yesterday.
"It was a rhythmic world, pulsing
constantly to a 1-2-3-4 measure.
IN STATE
SFlTlONS NEED RAIN—GRASS­
HOPPERS DO LITTLE DAMAGE
—LARGE HAY CROP BEIK6
CUT.
Pierre, June 29.—June has not
been just what is desired by small
a rain farmers la
some sections of
the state.
Rains have been local fn charac
ter, and while some secitons have
been favored and the promises of
May have continued, in other sectioaa
the showers have beerr light and the
heat of the month is beginning
to
show its effect upon the small grait,
but
1
repeal the Volstead act by Dr. Wal-j
lace Fritz, of Philadelphia, president
of the Allied Medical association of
America, in an address at the annual
convention of the organization. H*1
declared the prohibition law was a
curse and made more drunkards than
did the old laws.
"The precedent established by the
Volstead act," he said, "restricts
medical practice and, if the profes
sion values its therapeutic liberty, it
must meet it with a protest that will
command attention. The medical
profession should not permit itself
to be placed in a position before the
whole world
as
has not affected corn, as it
Sella His 4,000
A e I a n
Belle
Fourche, June
be­
I
am not altogether sure of the nature
of that life, if life it be, but there is
a continuation of human conscious
ness after the phenomenon which we
call death, though it may be a con
sciousness of a sort different from
any that we know anything about.
I am now certain of that.
"Th^ world in which
I
lived dur­
ing those forty-five minutes was
a
world of what we commonly know
as subconscious. It was something
like the sensations one experiences
after taking gas, only the sensations
and impressions were a great deal
more vivid and
more
Leavenworth,
fitei domin­
easily recalled."
Jack Johnson
To Be Released
Kan., June 29.—
Jack Johnson, negro heavy weight,
will be released from Hi federal
prison here July 9tb.
la
deeper rooted and needs hot weather
to develop.
In some sections the outlook de
pends upon rainfall within a few
days to prevent disaster to small
grain, but this is local in ita appli
cation, as many sections have secur
ed the showers which have kept up
the earlier promise of the year.
While the weather has not Been
favorable in the sections where the
showers
were light for small grain,
it has been ideal for alfalfa harvest
ing and the hay has been placed in
the stack without a wetting, and as
the earlier rains made an excellent
crop, this now is out of the way.
Grasshoppers are bothering
in
a
few sections, but the campaigns of
poisoning are beginning to show ef
fects, and the complaint is not as
general as it was a few years ago.
Cutting of prairie hay has com
menced with a good crop, and while
there will not be as much hay out
this year as was put in stack last
year the crop
being gathered ti In
excellent shape.
Chicago Girl "Kids"
Gang Of Bandits
Chicago, June 29.—Miss Frances
Bengart has her own system of deal
ing with bandits and it saved her
diamond rings and lavalliere last
night when she and her escort were
held up by armed thugs.
"Kid the bandits.
"Laugh
when
they put a gun to your face. "Keep
your head and you may save your
jewels," is the advice offered by Miss
Hengart. When the bandits clam
bered into the car in which Miss
n-ngart and John
R.
i fling, she kept up
Coulin were
a
kidding con
Y all fhtfc time
rsation with them, but all the time 5
she was removing her rings and oth
er valuables and slipping them dowu
Inside her blouse.
The bandits, who were escaped
convists, took Jewelry and money to
the value of $1,900 from Conlin, bur
they were speedily captured by th'
pr.] the loot was recovered.
29.—A
tract has been signed
com
between
A. If
Blackford and Gov. McCray, of In
diana, and John Williams, of
Belh*
Fourche, whereby the former sells
his 4,000-acre ranch on the Bell
Fourche river to the latter gentl*
men.
The ranch is one «f tfee moat val
uable pieces of property in the val
ley, and it is understood that Gov
McCray will convert it into a pure
bred stock ranch where he will raise
registered Hereford cattle in con
Junction with
a herd that
ing in Indiana.
1m to
rai#
o
Daily Market Report
Minneapolis Onin Market.
Minneapolis, June 2!).—Corn.—
Narrower demand for offerings, but
prices quoted at unchanged discounts
under the futures. No. 3 yellow clou
ed at 45 and 46c No. 3 mixed at 42
and 43c.
Oats.—Prices maintained compar
ed with futures and good elevator
demand held. No. 3 whites closed
at 31% and 32%, No. 4 whites at
29%
and 31 %c.
Rye.—Market
prices were
firm
compared with futures. Fair millin~
demand. No.
2 rye
closed at $1.09
and $1.11.
Barley.—Market firm for the best
quality and also for medium heavy.
Tone weak for lower grades.
closed at 44 and 60c.
Pries*
Sioux City Live Stock.
Sioux City, June 29.—The quality
of hogs averaged fairly good. Tops
went up to $8.65, and there wer^
several sales at the price. The
bulk
ranged from $7.90 and $8.50. B«
pigs are going around $7.50.
is jXrKfti msum xv J?:
fiANKiN S- f'&
SAFETY
U
rjjJiri
There isn't
rmr
"V^T: V
fK.
i I y
You should be as quick aa others in
/earning the advantages of having a
bank account in a reliable bank where
your
DEPOSITS ARE GUARANTEED
UNDER STATE LAW
DAKOTA STATE BANK
M*v
iitb Dakota
CONS£R YAT/v£i
I POL/CY
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
Makers of High Grade Butter
Msnufacturert of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream i
PHONE 2341 MADISON, S. D.
ffiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiieiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiM
THE TEST OF ALL
Sparkling Gem Pine Kindling
East River Soft Coal Oak and Maple Wood
Sterling Egg Scrantor Hard Cca!
Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.
Phone 2343 H. BLAGEN, Agent
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Large and Small Briquets
Kentucky Lump Splint Lump
Coke
E. W. KETCH AM &
PHONE 2338
1
*4c/t/r/£$
Helpful
sSJT^V/c^
vfoglr particular pertaining to the baakiag
business in which this bank ia not prepared to five 70a the
acme of good service.
OUR ABILITY AND WILLINGNESS
to aerre you represents your opportunity.
WE INVITE YOU
To start your account here and grow with us.
Hie start once made, your growth is aasured.
-^FEDERAL RESEPvt^V
MKSSS£3M MADISON, S. D.
THE OLDEST BA.MK
/A/
L. A HE COUNTY.
The Madison Creamery
3
COAL I

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