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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, March 07, 1922, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1922-03-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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Robert Fulton taking
his little boat up thd
i Hudson.
t\, The fttlrentton of
V -steam navigation—a
lucky strike for him.
LUCKY
.STRIKE.'
•V
I
When we discovered th*
"\iS toasting process six years
ago, it was a Lucky Strike
y:C us.
i'C| Why? Because now
^millions of smokers prefer
the special flavor of the
Lucky
r.
Suite
Cigarette
1 ecauso
s
It's Toasted*
•jf xv!.n v t.i i
delicious Durlcy flavor
And also because it's
p.
Che SDatlr ILeaDet
MADISON. SOUTH DAKOTA
miraon ai«a
"Tuesday, march 7, 1922"
mall, 1 year $1.00
jr mall, 6 months 1.S0
Bjr carrier, per week 10
J. F. STAHL, Proprietor.
H. A. STAHL. Business Manager prMS|on
STATE MEWS
Armour.—Fred Hochhalter, living
JMar here, established a record when
344 and one-half
and weighing
pSunds.
Artesian.—Some sf the finest
purebred livestock ever offered in
this part of the state will be includ
ed in a sale of the Sanborn County
Livestock Breeders' association, to
Be held here on Saturday, March 11.
Milbank.—At a meeting of
Miincii of the Grant County Com
munity league, which was recently
organized here, plans were made to
establish night school, through the
county. Night schools have already
been established at Troy, Standburg
and Revillo.
Philip.—A teacher came 25 miles
IB a sled over some of the worst
fbads ever seen in this section to at
tend the third district teachers meet
lag held here this week. Work ac
complished so far this year was dis
eased and plans for further work
lor the next term considered.
Aberdeen.—After nine hours de
liberation a jury in circuit court
found Peter Glavas guilty of first de
gree manslaughter. Glavas will be
sentenced at a later date by Judge
Walton. Glavas was charged with
•booting Peterf Delahanis following
an argument in a poker game In a
local hotel on the Greek new year,
January 13.
Huron.—There was a good attend
ance at the regular monthly meeting
"Wt the Huron District Medical so
ciety Friday evening with all physi
elans of the city in attendance. Ar
ttngements were made for the next
tuberculosis clinic to be held here
aftd results of the one held a short
time ago were discussed.
Hot Springs.—Frak Strom and J.
W. Libby, residents of the Hot
Springs territory, were arrested on
charge of bootlegging. Strom
pleaded guilty and was fined 1250
•rid costs and given a jail sentence
Sf
30 days in the county jail, which
Was supended on condition of good
Behavior, A still belonging to Libby
STas found on the William ranch near
Biere. Libby gave bonds for his ap
pterance at a preliminary hearing.
Wessington.—The N. J. Burg gen
Stal store here was broken into ear
ly Friday morning and six suits of
Nothing, two pairs of shoes and two
Suitcases in which the loot was pre
sumably carried away were stolen.
The robbers forced a lock on the side
entrance door and made a careful
Selection of the goods wanted, the
faults ranging from, 36 to 42 in size,
fhe sheriff at Huron spent the day
/forking on the case but was unable
«P secure any clue that wouid tend
|d help clear up the affair.
on nxs otTT—it xs wosra
aCOHBT
Cut out this slip, enclose with 6c to
Foley jfe Co., 2836 Sheffield Ave., Chi
writing your name and ad
rly. You will receive In re
trial package containing Foley's
Honey and Tar Compound, for coughs,
I- v tit out
I 52? &
irees deal
foley
•,
jlds ami croup. Foley Kidney Pills
(totimrm
"r
SEEKS REMEDY
FOR BAHIMES
Unemployment Bureau Making
Investigation of Recurrenot
of Industrial Depression*
NOW
mm
worked
T*M*fe~-SoM Sv«ry~
•KW
$ &
SERIOUS
is
City and Town Administrations Can
Hslp In Prsssnt Crisis by Spesd
lltf Hp Public Worka—Ivsry
ono Can Help.
•y COLONEL ARTHUR WOODS,
Chairman, Committee on Civic and Emer
gency Measures, President's Conference
OB Unemployment
Does the new year bring a pros
pect of belter times to the average
American worker? Are there to be
more names on the shop's pay roll lu
1922 than In 1921? Will there be
work for more bands on the farm?
Has the nation-wide spread of unem
ployment been checked? What are
we doing about this critical sltuutloD,
both In industry end agriculture, any
where?
We all know that early in October
last, President Harding called a con
ference on unemployment. Speeches
were made, reports were read, and
committee* appointed. Then this
significant gathering of men and
women from all over the country took
an adjournment. What has been done
alnce then? I think 1 can answer
this question, and some other queries
which might arise in any thinking mind
over this disturbing state of affairs.
Briefly, as a starter, let me say that
this recent conference has not been
like some other conferences, which
have met, discussed the subject, passed
resolutions, and then gone home, leav
ing as the only net result of the pro
cedure a printed report. Our con
ference is following up the conclusions
to which It came when it met in
Washington and it will continue to
keep on the Job until real results
are achieved.
••tared at jfatt°tt,C* must be spoken by the American people
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION
if
But In the Anal result the last word
themselves---you and I.
To Ward Off Bad Time*
The unemployment situation tan
two distinct features. One Is that
wherever a period of industrial de
lot of
people are thrown out of work, people
pur.r.le over why Iri the world it all
happens, and wonder what can be
it from happening
comes around and a
done t0
Prevent
he sold four of his hogs for $124, As soon as things ease up apaln,
the hogs being but 10 months old however, they stop puzzling und the re-
suit is that when the cycle comes
around again down drops businest
activity the same as before, and out
into the class of those out of work
drop hundreds of thousands of our
fellow citizens.
It Is important, therefore, to try
this time to see if something cannot
the
out to ward off these bad
times. The standing committee of the
conference is engaged on a study of
this subject, and expects to put in
,n"u»h
'l,"« ,"'a™
and to be able to put into effect, so
far as Its powers go, the measnres
necessary to prevent or alleviate these
recurring depressions. One way that
has been much talked about is through
public works. If the various kinds of
public works which city, state and na
tion are going ahead with all the time
could be done a little less during
periods when private Industry is boom
tag and a little more In times when
private industry has slowed up, this
procedure might tend at any rate to
make the cycle of depression when it
comes a little less severe than it
otherwise would have been. People
who have studied the situation estimate
that a plan of this kind could be
worked out which would not Involve
the postponement of sny public work
which it was Important to do soou,
yet would serve to make a period of
industrial depression at least 30 per
cent less severe than it would others
wise have been. A measure like this
is well worth while looking Into very
carefully and trying to bring about
If it can have this sort of good re
sults.
Help Needed Now.
The other feature of periods
ot
un­
employment is the immediate emer
gency, and the fact that hundreds of
thousands of our fellow citizens need
work and, through no fault of their
own but because of sn Industrial situa
tion beyond their control, can't get
It. The unemployable we have always
with us, the man who would rather
do most anything else than work, and
we are tempted to think of all people
ovt of work as being like him. In
times like these, however, we must not
forget that there are enormous num
bers of capsble workmen, eager to
work at anything that will enable them
to maintain themselves and their
1 families, yet unable to find a job.
I This is everybody's business. Al
though the situation is worse in some
parts of the country than in others,
It is a country-wide condition, and
can be met adequately only by coun
try-wide actiou. Everyone can help.
In the first place, city administra
tions can help. They can speed up
public works which have got to be done
•oon anyway and which, if people get
a little busy, can be done now rather
titan later. Public employment
bureaus can be started and operated
skillfully and vigorously, so as to
flud all the Jobs there are and to fit
into them people who are qualified
to do the work. The United States
employment service offers its help, in
chiding the franking privilege, to any'
1
y
4
i v-
1"
such bureau. It can be brought to the
attention of the people in the city that
private work that has got to be done
anyway should be undertaken now,
rather than "sometime." It can be
made clear to everyone In town that
even little odd Jobs done nmv help
the situation, since the men who do
them get little pay that they wouldn't
otherwise have got, and so add to
th«' purchasing power of the country.
Many cities have carried on sustained
"spruce-up" campaigns with the re
sult that the old town never looked
so well-groomed and spick and span,
and that many people who were in
hard luck were helied out cft a very
distressing situation.
Everyone Can Help.
And you and I, what can we do?
We can help out someone who is
in hard luck, who can't get a chance
to earn a living that he is capable
of earning, and who would give his
eye teeth If he could get the oppor
tunity of earning. We can help him
out, perhaps with clothes, perhaps
with a place to live in for himself
and his family, perhaps with some
regular meals, even if we haven't any
extra cash that we could devote to
the purpose. The American workman
Is a pretty nelf-rellant Individual.
When he loses his Job he will take
care of himself as long as he can,
economizing, doing odd Jobs, living on
his savings. When he can't last any
longer this way he will take from
people from whom he has a right to
ask It. because they are' relatives or
real friends, because he has helped
them before when they have been out
of luck or because they know that
If the conditions were reversed he
would help them. He gets help too, per
haps. from his church, his lodge, from
groups to which he belongs. This sort
of thing enables him to hang on a
while longer In the class of those
who make their own way, and the
American sticks in this class Just as
long as he can manage to. It is only
when he has exhausted every resource
and knows not where to turn that he
(inally drops into the class of those
de|Mndent upon the public. The men
and women of America who have jobs
can help those who haven't to keep in
the class of the self-sustaining and
keep out of the class of those who
have to throw themselves on the pub
lic for help.
And we can help also, you and I, by
having work done now that we other
wise might not have done until next
spring. The only cure for unem
ployment Is, of course, employment,
and each In his little way can help
to bring this about. We live in a big
country, ami If most of the people in
It help, even in a little way, we can
move mountains.
USE JOBLESS TO CURB CRIME
Philadelphians Engage 4,000 as Pri
vate Night Watchmen to Btop
Thefts.
Philadelphia, Pa.—A plan to use 4,
000 unemployed men In the city as
night watchmen, their wnges to be paid
by contributions of fifteen cents weekly
by *-nch family in the territory they
are to guard, has been suggested to
the unemployment committee by Mayor
Moore. Tlte plan, it is said, has the
Indorsement of police department of
ficials.
Under the proposed scheme each
man Is to patrol four sides of a city
block, performing the duties of private
watchmen. They are not to be uni
formed and this, the mayor said, will
decrease automobile thefts, burglaries
and robbing of all sorts.
PARIS LANDLORDS "ABUSED"
20,000 Tenants Refuse to Pay Rent
Legislation Blamed at Mass
meeting.
Paris.—Paris landlords say they are
the most abused persons In the world.
They agreed to this unanimously at
a mass meeting they held recently.
Thev reported they are unable to col- ftn,ctlon
leet rents from more than 20,000 ten-
ants or to evict these unprofitable oc
cupants.
All this Is the fault of recent legisla
tion, say the landlords, giving tenants
who were immune from payment of
rent during the war the right to find
other quarters before vacating. The
landlords say that when they try to
sell their properties no bids are forth
coming because of the existing situa
tion.
•ird
y
Stops Clotfb
Pendleton, Ore.—Local citizens
awake during the early hours wer*
amazed when the faithful old clock
which has adorned the tower of the
county courthouse since 1888 tolled Ueved to be the lesst affected,
out 12 o'clock. Investigation revealed
that a bird had perched on one of the
bands at midnight and that the dock
was unable to record the hours until
the interloper had departed.
Ram Sacrificed in
Christian Chufdi
re-enactment of a Bibli­
cal episode to depict the faith
fulness of Abraham in offering
his son, Isaac, as a sacrifice took
place recently when a 75-pound
ram was killed by Rev. T. I.
Jones, pastor of Mount Calvary
Baptist church in Springfield,
Mass., in the presence of a con
gregation that taxed the church
Huditorium to capacity. The
daying of a ram on a religions
altar has never before, it is said,
taken place In Massachusetts.
SEEK NEW FIELDS
Jobless Trained Men Forced to
Ask Work in Other Lines.
EVEN STORE JOBS ARE SOUGHT
employed aa Watchmen Tlifr]
Times Mend—Thousands
Idle—Mining
of
eers In All Parts
Engin-1
of
the Country Art
Experts
est Hit—Result
gineering
Are the Hard­
May
Be That En­
Wiil Be
Extended to New,
Fields—Mining Relief In Sight.
Forced by the general condition of
unemployment to *eek new fields, en-
Mining Engineers Hit Hard.
The mining engineers are the hard
est hit. F. F. Sharpless, secretary of
the American Institute of Mining and
Metallurgical Engineers, said that it
was Impossible to determine the num
ber of such engineers out of employ-
ment, but he would not be surprised
if the number reached 5,000.' Mr.
Sharpless said that relief would be
experienced in the mining industries
soon with the resumption of opera
tions in the big copper mines. The
Institute normally has 10.000 members.
The Institute's data on unemploy
ment revealed many cases in which
men in normal periods earning from
$2,500 to $15,000 a year were driven to
accept minor Jobs, such as watchmen,
or were out of work altogether.
The volunteer committee now at
vork, principally in the New York dis
trict, is composed of thirty men. F.
M. Bond of Baltimore, a major in the
ordnance department during the war.
has been appointed chairman. An ex
ecutive committee consists of W. N
(Jately and George Heavers Jr. of
NTew York and C. B. Good of White
Plains.
Mr. Gately said tbat idleness was
likely to result In the extension of
engineering to new spheres. When the
volunteers called on the department
stores they were received with skepti
clam
i*4*t
i
11 n at
cism Decause retailing traditionally
has been regarded as foreign to en-
glneering. Now, however, the pos
sibilities of engineering training are
beginning to be better understood.
Cost methods, simplification of sys
tems und personnel were activities,
he said, to which industrial engineers
might properly apply their efforts.
Many Seek Jobs.
The employment service conducted
by the Federated American Engineer
ing Societies Is free. Mr. Brown said
that 3,165 men In different parts of the
country were on the active list seek
ing employment. During the early
part of January 125 positions were
filled, and for these 600 men were
waiting.
Mr. Gately said that Instead of
going over prepared ground a careful
study of possibilities was made, and
these fields were found to offer new
opportunities for the engineer: Indus
trial, covering manufacturing, con-
an
i
i
,n«'
consulting work bank-
hunting, insurance, department
stores, filing and publication. Mr.
Brown gave the number of men reg
istered during 1921 at the Federation's
Employment Service as 1,905. Of
these, 1,365 were placed in positions.
More men were placed In December
than In any other month, and more men
were registered In June than In any
month, the lew mark in this respect
being In November.
It was said that nationally the civil
engineers ranked next to the mining
engineers In numbers of unemployed,
with the electrical engineers third.
The American Society of Mechanical
Engineers, the largest organization of
engineers in the country, with a mem
bership of more than 16,000 was be-
INFANT FINE SPELLER
Long
Werde Have
This Little Lad.
The words Mediterranean, picalilli
Deuteronomy, formaldehyde, acclama
tion, Constitutional, dissipation, au
thoritatively, and other similar ones,
hold no terrors to Fern Waterman,
four-and-one-half-year-old phenomenal
speller, who lives in the Ozark Hills,
near Eldrldge, Wis.
Whenever the lad comes to town
with his parents lie soon becomes the
center of Interest.
He
exhibitions of his spelling prowess
One of the things the youngster likes
to do Is to stand on the station plat
form and when a train stops to take
water or wait while baggage is being
handled. Fern spells for the passen
gers.
None of the jswbreakers that so fre
quently "stump" adults give Fern any
trouble. The lad spells all of tbem
with comparative ease.
RATS MENACE BUDAPEST
Rodents From Russia Overrun Clty»—
Encouraged by Cat Shortage.
Rats and mice are migrating In
swarms from the Russian famine area
and Budapest is now overrun with
i 4hem. Ai4 efforts to-rid-.the city..of
this scourge have failed and the de
vastation caused by them goes on
apace.
The market .h»Us, food stores and
warehouses are swarming with the
rodents, which run about even In the
daytime. So dangerous have they be
come that when disturbed they will
turn and show fight.
The situation is aggravated by the
dearth of cats. During the war, when
food was scarce, thousands of fami
lies ate their cats. Since then the In
creasing demand for cat fur hus taken
a further toll. As a consequence, the
comparatively exorbitant price of 8,
MH to 4,000 kronen is being offered
for a kitten by shopkeepers.
i
gineers of the metropolitan district of
New York have formed a volunteer
committee to open up fresh avenues
of effort. Department stores, indus
trial establishments and many branch-'
es of trade, commerce and manufac
turing are being thoroughly canvassed!
to uncover hidden jobs into which,
under modern methods of organiza
ticn, it Is thought the engineer can
be fitted.
Thousands of engineers, mostly
graduates of colleges and technical
schools, are Idle in all parts of the
country, it was said by Walter V.
Brown, manager of the employment
service of the Federated American
Engineering societies. The situation
is so bad that the service maintained
by the societies is being supplemented
by volunteer assistance.
In some villages peasants have
turned to the now lucrative business
ot breeding.
GIRL WALKS IN SLEEP
on Men's Clothes and Takes
Long March.
Dorothy Sherman, nineteen years
old, daughter of J. L. Sherman of Ea
ton, Col., walked 11 miles in her sleep
recently, according to reports here.
The girl, attired In her brother's
overalls, sweater and junior and her
father's wool socks, staggered into
La Salle, 12 miles south of Eaton,
early this morning and asked that her
parents be notified.
The girl declared she went to sl*ep
nt nigiit and that she knew nothing
more until she was awakened by a
passing automobile on a bridge a mile
north of La Salle. According to her
father, she has not been well lately.
NOTICE OI" HEARING PETITION
truHlttnnnllv Schultz, Deceased. The State of South
Dakt)ta Sen is
Greeting to Emma
schuit?. and Bert Rand Schultz heirs at
law und next of kin of Edward G.
Schultz, deceased, and to all to whom
these presents may come.
Notice is hereby given that Emma
Schultz has filed with the Judge of
this Court, a petition praying for Let
ters of Administration of the Estate of
i Edward G. Schultz, Deceased, be issued
to C. A. Stensland of Madison S. D. and
that Wednesday, the 8th day of March.
11922, at 9 o'clock A. M. of said day being
a day of a regular term of this Court,
to-wit: of the March term, 1922. at the
office of the County Judge in the City
of Madison. County of Lake, State of
South Dakota, has been set for hearing
said petition, when and where any per
son interested may appear and show
cause why the said petition should not
be granted.
Dated at Madison, South Dakota,
F. i.,. Burnett,
Clerk of Courts.
Xans Urdahl,
Attorney for PetitlaMM
HalTsCatarrhMedicine
Those who are in a "run down" con
dition will notice that Catarrh bothers
fhem much more than when they arc
in good health. This fact proves that
while Catarrh is a local disease. It is
greatly influenced by constitutional
conditions. HALL'S CATARRH
MEDICINE Is a Tonic and Blood Puri
fier, and acts through the blood upon
the mucous surfaces of the body, thus
reducing the inflammation and restor
ing normal conditions.
All druggists. Circulars free.
V. J. Cheney ft Co., Toledo, Obi*.
OOOD FOR THAT "FIitT" COUOH
Mrs. K. D. Drake, Chtlds, Md., writes:
"After an attack of the flu that left
me with a severe cough nothing seemed
to relieve me till I tried Foley's Honey
and Tar, which I can highly recom
mend." It is also good for croup, whoop
ing c-mgh .and colds. Children like it.
Contains no opiates.—Sold Everywhere.
DR. RENSVOLD
DENTIST
Office is Lannon-Cook Block
PHONG *168
MADISON SO. DAK.
Sheridan, Shearer and
Sheridan
Abstracts, Insurance. Bonding
frequently gives Madison, S. D. Phone 2262
spelling
DR. C. C. HOAGLAND
SPECIALIST
Disease* and Surgery of Eye,
E&a Nose and Throat
Eyes tested and glasses fitted.
Hours:—8:30 to 12 and 1 to
gets
FOX
LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION
StHttt ol" HuUtll lJtiivotcl, County of
I,ake, ss.—In County Court. In the
Matter of the Estate of Inez Beckner,
Deceased. The State of South Dakota
Sends Greeting to Frank Beckner, Mary
Huctt, Nelly .Johnson, Roy Foster, May
Foster, Frank Foster, David Foster.
Raymond Foster, Daisy Mc'rillivray
heirs at law and next of kin of Inez
Beckner, deceased, and to all to whom
these presents may come.
Notice is hereby given that Frank
Beckner has filed with the Judge of
this Court, a petition praying for Let
ters of Administration of the Estate of
Inez Beckner, Deceased, and that Satur- ,,
day, the 11th day of March. 1922, at
10 o'clock A. M., of said day, being
a day of a regular term of this Court,
to-wit: of the March term, 1922, at the
office of the County Judge, in the
I.annon-Cook Block, in the City of Madi
son, in the said County of Lake, has
been set for hearing said petition, when
and where any person interested may
appear and show cause why the said
petition should not be granted.
Dated at Madison this 27th day of
February, A. D. 1922.
IRA F. BLEWITT,
Judge of the Omtr Court.
Attest:
F. I#. Burnett,
Clerk of Courts.
Hans Urdahl,
Attorney for Petitioner.
NOTICE OF HEARING PETITION TCt1
LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION
StHt.- "I South Dakota. Comity of
l.ako, .st.. In County Court. In the
Matter of the Estate of Edward G.
the
^kMASTIKS
'A tiwt
9.
Saturday evenings 7 to 9.
Ifekota State Bank Building
It52f
IGPOI
^•akinb en*9"
this
2&th dUy of February A. D. 1922.
IRA P. BLEWITT,
County Judge.
Attest:
BE SURE
of perfect results on
bake-day. Don't spend
your time in preparing
bakings that contain
expensive ingredients
and be disappointed
when you take them out
of the oven. Use
CALUMET
BAKING POWDER
not because
Take Yeast Vitamon
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job-Winning "Pep"
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tun-down folks who find that business is b»d and emptoyaMet i#
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their meald for a short time and watch how their physical and financial coup»
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Maatin's VITAMON Tabled supply in highly concentrated
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rie easy and economical
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member
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You can
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Beesley Dray Line
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ROY BEESLEY
it's
the
A pound can of Calumet contains full
16 oz. Some baking powders come
12 oz. cana instead of 16 oz. cans. Be
sure you get a pound when you want it
"1
£J
CHAS. A. TRIMMER
CONSULTING ENGINEER
Larfd Drainage. Surreys and Munici
pal Engineering.
MADISON SOUTH DAKOTA
MJl. AND MRS.
A. 6. HALLENBECK
Undertaken
PHONES: Hoaee MM Offloe 9M6
AUTO HEARSE HHRVIOB
Orer Geo. Beck'# Fwnttnre Store
MADISON I $0. DAK.
wijj-
Why not be
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lets for a short
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ing result*.
Mastin'sVITAMONTabletsatallgood druggists.
Are Positively Guaranteedi
to Put On Firm Fleshy
Clear the Skin and Increase
Energy When Taken Witk
Every Meal or Money Back
Phone 3772
acc
DC3I
iQhU
zaa
CATARRH
OF THE STOMACH
-—ii •1,1
1 1
''."jaa
CANT ENJOY LIFE
with a tore, sour, bloated stom
ach. Food does not nourish.
Instead it is a source of misery, causing
pains, bclciting, dn?inw» aad head
aches.
The pcrtfi with a bad (toma S
should be satisfied with nothing less
than permanent, lasting relief.
•I The right remedy will act upon tlie
linings of the stomach, enrich the blood,
aid in casting out the catarrhal poisons
and strengthen every bodily function.
The Urge number of people who
have turcessfully used Dr. Hartman's
famous medicine, recommended for all
catarrhal conditions, offer the arongMl
possible endorsement for
PE-RU-NA
IN SERVICE FIFTY YEARS
pswiHllltf""" ..jiiHiuiiHmiBmpiw
TABLETS OR LIQUID
SOLD EVERYWHERE
111
big­
gest selling brand on earth,
but because it is absolutely
the most dependable and eco
nomical of ail leaveners.
When you employ Calu
met Baking Powder you know
that your bakings will raise
properly because it contains
more than the ordinary leav
ening strength.
Don't waste energy and
money on uncertain baking
powder use Calumet, the
pure and sure" brand.
"1 —IP——1
DR. C. H. R. HOVDE
PHYSICIAN ANI) SURGEON
Office Over Dakota 8tate
Bank
HOURS:
9-12 a. m.. 1-5, 7-1 p. m.
Office Phone 217T Res. Phone 81TV
Madiaoi South Dakoty
DR. H. P. GULSTINE
E N I S
OCflee Over Dakota Mate
PHONB aioe
Drs. Kellogg & Allison
PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS
Telephone 2133 Madieon. S. D.
Chiropractic Health Parlors
Over Lyric Theatre
Office Hours: 10 to 12 A. M.
2 to 5P.m.
Dr. MATHILDA HOGE
Phone 2251 CHIROPRACTOR
Res. Hexom Apts.
Dfi. A. H. NOLAN
DBNTIST
Office in Hantemer Mod
PHONB 2291
Madison Electric Co.
WIRING, FIXTURES. MOTORS
AND SUPPLIES
fM
IpM Ave. Whtmrn SIM
4SL
ie,
a

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