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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, April 29, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1922-04-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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0 INVESTIGATE
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IftNATR FINANCE CXMMITTKK
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BONUS I881R.
Washington, April 29.—The Unit-
•A
S a e s s e n a e o a y w i o u e
-j
bste, passed the LaFollette resolution
Which calls for a sweeping investl-l
gat Ion of the leasing by the interior
•nd navy departments of tha naval i
Oil reserves in California and Wyom
fig to private oil interests.
Washington, Ajpril 29.—Republi-I
•tn members of die senate finance i
eommittee today divided into two I
e i n i e o u s o v e e s o i e
bonus bill. As result, two different:
bills will be thrown into the com-!
puttee's lap nexfrereelc and a tussle.
Irill begin.
n
IIISSII REJECTS
FRENCH JERMS
ftlE
NOH AND
y.
BRITISH TERMS
WifcL BE COMBINED BY AL­
LIES FOR RUSSIA
•fNmm, A*ri! 29.—will re
Jtct the French terms for an agree
ment with the allies, but will can
ski
er
British terms accepted as basis
lor negotiations. The decision was
reached by the Russian delegation in
conference which continued until
early hour this morning.
.7 The allies intend to combine and
i|-ordinate the French and British
tHrrns if) one note which will be pre
minted to the Russians before night.
f*or the purpose of doing this the
Wib-coramjssions In charge of draft
bIK the note met at 11 o'clock this
morning.
I§ Genoa, April 29.—France today
#tified Lloyd George that it oppos
ed any meeting of the reparations
«|mmittee untiy after May 31, on
Vhich date,the Germans are expected
default in the reparations
ftJinpeapoliH Man
Killed and Robbed
Minneapolis. April 29.—Slayers of
Isved
arold Hanson, 50 years old, are be
to have robbed him of a con
siderable gum of money and killed
s blm to insure silence. Hanson was
the proprietor of a shoe repair shop
tjpd was found dying in a shed late
^riday.
A. M. Will, a friend, told the po
llee that Hanson had withdrawn
Itrge sums from South Dakota banks
fpon persuasion of strangers. Po-
8lat
ce scouted this theory declaring
Hanson had been drinking heav
^y and may hare suffered scalp
founds in a fall.
iw
if
if.
i
^7'-
enty Killed In
.Chinese Battle
Shanghai, April 29. Bombing
•jblaneg defeated river gunboats in a
Rattle at Canton, according to dls-
fatches from that city which were
feceived here today. Three planes
#f the Canton government attacked
e warships in Pearl river when
crews were suspected of being
Sympathetic with the Peking gov
ernment. A direct hit was scored on
"ihe river cruiser, Haichi. The bomb
filled twenty sailors and wounded
others who surrendered.,
Cheap Gasoline Seen
New Discovery
Sa*1 Francisco, April 29.—A reduc
tion in the prioe of gasoline and the
addition of 10,000,000 gallons an
nually to the California refineries'
4utput will result from the success
jpf secret experiments conducted in
iHan Francisco for a period of more
than three years, according to state
ents made today by C. P. Bowie,
troleum engineer attached to the
nited States bureau of mines here.
k$-IT*
The process, as explained by Mr.
Trill mak« 9«Pibl« tM
ductlon of gasoline In Immense com
mercial quantities from ashphatuni
oil shale, oil waste, tar and tar wit
"below grade" oil, all of which here
tofore have baffled every effort to
wrest from them the gasoline tfcey
are known to contain.
S 11 I
U
I
11
pay­
ments. The British replied that the
Situation must be discussed as the
mrisls prose.
o
Nearly Fatal
Kennebec, April 29.—Using sul-1
phur for the purpose of renovating
I
e e n s n e s s i n e i k e n o u s e
SWEPT if RIVER
MISSISSIPPI BREAK OVER LEVEE
RE.\lERl\'ji THOI'SAXDM
HOMELESS.
Xatehes, Lousiana, April lf,-i*yln
Inland sfea of the seething flobd Wa
ters from Mississippi river covered
more than two hundred .thousand
acres -of land in five Louisiana Par
ishes today. Thte flood was sweep
ing all plantations and villages in It"
path. It is reported that planters
will suffer losses totalling between
three and five million dollars.
E
.EftTV BONDS ARE IS CIR­
CULATION.
Washington, D. C., April 29.—fthe
oft reiterated charge that the coun
try Is flooded with duplicate Liberty
bonds and reiterated yesterday in
the house by Representative Royal
C. Johnson, of South Dakota,
repub-
lican, who declared the duplicates
would aggregate $400,000,000, was 1
again emphatically denied todfky by
the treasury department
Secretary of the Treasury Mellon
authorized the statement that Rep
resentative Johnson's sensational
charges, which may lead to a con
gressional investigation, were un-|
founded. Other treasury officials
declared that they were ridiculous
and deprecated them because of the
constnnt irritation to th public mind
caused thereby.
Secretary Mellon asserted that the)
only duplicate numbered bonds that
ever were circulate? were those due
to faulty working of som^e machin
ery at the bureau of engraving and
printing during the war rush. Tb«j
duplicate bonds were discovered, ac
counted for, and the government got
the money for them and will redeem
them when presented. These bonds
have not caused the government any
toss and will not nor will any invest-
AT LAKE
KVERY ACCOMMODATION READY
tbXm CROWDS A* PAVIIiW,
i
I nearly caused the death of Mrs. Wil- I
i a a i o i s i y I n s o e
manner she inadvertently inhaled so
much of the fumes that she nearly
strangled to death. She managed
to get out of the henhouse and stag-
Por, many months everything at
l)ie Lake Madison Chautauqua
grounds has been in a state of in
activity, cottages deserted, boats
locked up, cafeteria closed and quiet
reigning in every nook and corner,
but tonight much of that conditio*
will suddenly change and music and
merriment will be heard as the dan*
gered across an alley, where she fell I cing season opens at the pavilion
against the back door of a neighbor, i with one of the livest orchestras in
Hearing the fall the neighbor went this section on hand for furnishing
to the door, and upon discovering m^sic.
Mrs. Patrich's plight applied such Beginning tonight there will b«
remedies as she deemed beneficial. I a series of three dances every week*
o I namely, on Tuesday, Thursday and'
i Saturday evening.
i Much work has been done at thtf
lake preparatory not only for thS
dance season but for the regular
Chautauqua period coining in July.
All has been looked after that af
fords accommodations for the sev
eral large conventions coming to the
grounds in the next few weeks.
McDonald Bros, of the Lake Park
will conduct the hotel business at
the lake, and, forecasting a big rush,
these gentlemeu have completely re
novated the hotel building and put
it in first class condition. Consider
able painting has been done and new
furniture placed in a number of the
rooms
Frank Regan and Jack Waddea
will have charge of the refreshment
rooms under the dance hall. Mr. and
Mrs. A. D. Tower have been given
authority witfr regard to the boats,
fishing and bathing supplies. The
cafeteria opens May 1. More than 23
people are employed on the, grounds.
Many decided improvements are
to be noted at the chautauqua
New Orleans, La., April 29.—Dm- grounds. A concrete retaining has,
spairing of repairing Mississippi i been constructed in front of the boat
river levee breaks at Poydras and house and back of that have beeft
Ferriday, Louisiana, engineers andjduitiped about 250 loads of gravel,
volunteer relief workers today cen- Other loads of gravel have been
tered their efforts on the removal of
all the flood victims to safety. The
flood area in the Ferriday section
was gradually beinjsf enlarged by the
released waters. Thousands have
been made homeless.
IAH
MELLOU REITERATES ASSER.
TION THAT NO DUPLICATE LIB-
placed in front of the hotel and In
other parts of the grounds, where
needed. In fact, much of the street
ways h^ve been regraveled and put
in splendid condition for the heavy
traffic coming on the grounds.
Elaborate preparations are c4n
sidered for illumination. Across the
streets will hang strings of multi
colored electric light bulbs with doz
ens upon dozens of other lights at
various points. Best of all in this (tricts
connection it was stated that a criminals,
large flood light upon the ridge of
the boat house will shed a radiance
over the beach, where bathers are
wont to enjoy swimming during the
long, hot
summer
months.
A
People are already getting their
cottages ready for summer use. Sev
eral families have taken up Quarters
On the grounds thus early in the sea
son.
Committees from the Odd Fel
lows' lodge, the Kiwanis club, the
local firemen and from the Elka
lodge are having their regular ses
sions while negotiating oa the mat-
ter Qf
in
i
these duplicate bonds aggregated,
but officials insist that it was a com
paratively small amount. Secretary
Mellon and his associates cannot un
derstand why the "reckless asser
tion" that the country is flooded
with duplicates continues to be made.
Because of their constant reitera-1 wage issues and other disputes as
tion the treasury department, it is! they arise.
said, would welcome a congressional The president hopes to evolve a
inquiry if congress should see fit to scheme which will not only bring an
direct one. Some members think end to the present conflict but pre-
Johnson had nothing to add today
to his speech of yesterday on the
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1 A
4
'j
"I':
2
'Viav I*
decorations for the big events
in their line scheduled
just ahead.
There is a prospect ahead for one
of the greatest seasons the chautau
qua association and management
have ever witnessed. This will be
due mainly to the large number of
conventions mocing to the county.
o
their line scheduled for dates
.jSk1. tg"", *".
CHIKP KXEi TIVK KXPIX'TS TO
CAM, OPKHATOB8 AND MIN-
tBilg TO WASHlNGTOlTr
®rs lose anything thereby.
There never has been any official Washington, D. C., April „r«iate new
admission as to just how much
President Harding's plan for set-, anl 8'rls in a
tling the coal strike, which he
development, which wouM not in-:
elude federal supervision of the coal
industry, it is reported today, will
provide
for creation
i A '. .'t-n-
s V o
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1922.
larue
search light on top of the hotel will
put the chautaukua grounds on the
map by casting beams nightly over
a wide scope of country.
not until Mr. Harding is ready to
call the operator* miners to Wash
ington for a conference.
1
From other sources however, it'
is learned that Mr. Harding and his
advisers are leaning heavily toward i
the establishment of a permanent!
coal wage commission, created by
i
law, which would have jurisdiction
over the industry somewhat similar ipaRfpiKi
to that now exercised by the rail-!
road labor board over wages In tbe
transportation industry.
v)
IiKIII llAsI lllll 111"
ERATING IN THAT DIS-
TBICfr.
city ha
by criminal gangs and the territory
of each is sacred to the operations
of the particular gang to which it
is allotted.
The story of the city's underworld
map and the steps in the education
of a criminal was told by Capt. Her
bert J. Slabery, former commander
of an army transport, who drifted
into crime after the war. Slabery
by hia own confession, became a gun
toting gangster through desperation
when he was unable to find honest
work Brought into the criminal
court and sentenced, Slaberj told hi?
story. His attorney's plea for clem
ency was seconded by Assistant Dis
trict Attorney Murphy, who said
through Slabery's confession six
crime mysteries had been solved and
nine-men arrested.
"Men1 are outside waiting for him
now," said Slabery's attorney. "He
has been threatneod while in the
Tombs and his life is unsafe unless
he is constantly guarded."
Sentence was deferred until JvitO
21.
After the war Slabery found him
self without a job and returned to
former haunts in Yorkville. There
he eventually enlisted in a ganji,
and on Maxell 14 participated in his
first crime—the'holdup Of dgar
store.
He learned, he confessed, that ter
ritory in which his gang operated
was safe from the depredations of
other gangs and similarly, his gang
was pledged not to trespass in, dls
allotted to other bands ol
In his first holdup Slabery w»s
the inside man. After robbing Jos
eph Mann., the clerk, of $15, Slab
ery locked him in a rear room. He
was arrested as he left the store
At police headquarters he was iev
ognized by Detective Roddy, a for
mer member of the A. E. F. Slabery
confessed to ^loddy and explained
the system o'f mapping the city so
that each gang operated in its own
district.
iif'»••
1 .lll»11"
Dope Is Sold To
S o o i e n
Denver, April 29.—Drug peddler!
have plied their trade among Denver
school children, having sold drugs
for days within a block of the North
Denver high school, according to the
report returned by a federal gran4
indictments against 100 persons, re
jury here The grand jury returned
indictments against 100 persons, 45
per cent of the indictments being for
violation of drug laws.
On Easter Sunday, the report de
clared, narcotic agents found six
girls, between 17 and 19 years old,
among new drug addicts. Most of
the persons indicted have been ar
rested.
Lucius F. Hallett,* president of the
Denver board of education, today de
clared that he saw no cause for
alarms in the report of the federal
grand jury that narcotic peddlers
were selling their, warbtf to
school pupils.
"I believe that such attirity ts tx
jftfgerated and overestimated," he
said. "It is within the realm of pos
sibility that "dope peddlers' have
an-!trade,
nounced yesterday was in process of able.
in pr
ura
of
commission empowered to deal with
that the inquiry should be held, It! vent others in future and serve to'( Earl Hodges as a justice of the peace
for no other reason than to satisfy. stabilize the long turbulent nd un- for Todd county, and to Leonard Oli
the public mind. Representative certain industry. ver as a constable for that county.
No official disclosures concerning Both are located at Lake View
details of the plan have come from and will dispense justice to that sec
fee White House and probably
wOl'tUfe V-
but it s*ma highly improb-
OfficCFS
a standing! UIfOr££iIllZ£€i UOUHtlCS
v
FOF
Pierre. April 29.—Under the re
guirement that the governor appoint
peace officers and local officials in, ptg8
unorganized counties, Governor Mc
Master has issued commissions to
\ty*
A
n
v
•sses
FREIGHT RATES
OH BUILDING MATER.
IALH CUT IN SOUTH DA­
KOTA*
Ull Sioux Falls, April 29.—The South i
UIIUUIIU Ull I IIL.II Dakota board of railroad commis
sioners has issued its report and or
der in the general investigation con
ducted by it on rates of various
kirfds of building materials, includ
_______ ing said, gravel, crushed stone, brick'
tile and related articles, the decision
TERRITORY EACH IS SACKED! establishing a distance scale of rates
on sand, grave! and crushed stone
*0 THE GAN? WHICH 18 OP-
which, with a few exceptions, re
sults in substantial reductions under
the existing rates between all sta
tions in the state. A distance scale
is also established on bricke, tile,
building blocks and related com-,
Flandreau Church
Plans Work For Boys
MADISON URAIN
At 3 p. m. today, com, 43
27 barley, 44 and 45.
^4 I
Hew York, April 29.—New York! "»«"'between all points, and ,?J||,H«IIIHi»«l«IIIIIIMI»ll»«lllimillllllIIII»»lll«»*tHI»IHIIIIinilll»ll»IIIII!llll«llll««HI*i
been Bhided into districts i which also results In material re
ductions and which places South Da- S
kota shippers on substantially the
same basis as interstate shippers to 5
South Dakota points. 2
The board has also ordered a re
duction in rates from the gravel pits s
near Sioux Falls to Sioux Falls from E
approximately $20 per car to $12.50 S
per car, and also from the stone S
quarries near Rapid City to Kapid S
Ciy from approximately $20 to $10 S
per car. It also establishes a new
system for the construction of joint 55
rates on shipments of the commodi- 5
ties involved between points on dif- 5
ferent lines of railroad, and its or
der requires the railroad companies
to make the reduced rates effective
on or before May 15, next.
Flandreau, April 29.—Tbe Y. M. s
C. A. is sending a delegation of
boys from the Brookings college to
Flandreau for the wee •_ ending April
28, 29 and 30 to conduct the services
in the Methodist church.
The Ladies' Aid society has pre
pared a big banquet for the "Father j=
and Son" banquet Friday evening, s
April 28. All day Saturday will be
given to the younger boys and at
night will be "stunt night" for the
men aud boys.
Sunday morning the young men
from the college will have an im
portant part in the Sunday school.
Kev. C. S. Lyies, the pastor, will
speak at 11 o'clock on "Three Things
Every Boy Must Have." The rest of
the day will be managed by the Y.
M. C. A. young men from Brook
ings.
The Flandreau Methodist church
has made great preparations for a
great time. The following week-end
May 6, 6 and 7, a similar program
will be put on by the Y Jtf.,
girls from Brookings.
Minneapolis Grain Marked
Minneapolis, Apri 29.—Corn.--•
Firm to l-2c better No. 3 yellow
at 6 and 7c under Chicago May
demand good No. 2 yellow closed at
56 3-4 and 56 l-4c No. 2 mixed
at 54 3-4 and 55 l-4c.
Oats.— Market relatively l-2e
higher No. 3 whites at 2 1-2 and
3 l-2c over May shipping demand
good, sales large: No. 3 whites clos
ed at 35 3-4 and 36 3-4c No. 4
whites at 33 3-8 and 35 l~4c.
Rye.—Firm, unchanged, N.o S
2 1-2 and 3c over May. No. floe
closed at $1.01 and $1.01 1-1.
iaiouny mat 'I! ty was considered pretty good. Th
given arcotics to high school boys.
Sioux City Live Mock.
JBarley.—Mostly 1-2 and lo high
er, with top raised late in the ses
sion. Prices closed at 53 and 64c.
1 hogs are running more to the mixed
order than a couple of weeks ago
and sows are arriving in greater
numbers. The weights are also
heavier. Two or three loads of very
heavy butchers were Included and
they sold at $9.75 and $9.80. Mixed
heavies sold under $9.7 5 and the
low sa^e was made at $9.00. .Sows
off the loads sold at $8.50 and
$8.75 and stags mostly at $6.60.
at
5
Sioux City, April 29.—The quali
steady rates,
CVT mi OUT—1* WOSTB
Cut out this slip, enclose with 6c to & if
Foley & Co..
28SS sheffied
Ave., Chica-
go. 111., writing your name and address
clearly. You
will receive
1
&
I
Daily Market Report Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drtnks
4.
oats.,
1 PHONE 2341

-w. ,»
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3\j
A GOOD BANK—
Co-operates with
customers for its pros
perity depends their
prosperity.
1
CO-OPERATION
With customers ft*
mutual welfare is the
constant aim of *6
y*
MADISON,
«r.- %'J -ny
Fundamental
n
America is endowed by nature with many soils, and many
resources. She is fundamentally sound in her institutions
and firmly entrenched in her possession of the basic essen
tials of life and happiness. From her mountains and plains,
her forests and sea coasts, spring those things that are
needed by the world. Prosperity, like the tide, rises and
ebbs, but the wealth of this country is the wealth that en
dures and cannot be long depreciated by surface influences.
This bank has dealt for about forty years with those en
gaged in developing the fundamental resources of the na
tion, and has confidence in the strength of the land and the
enterprise of her people.
THE FIRST NATIONAL RAM
rEDtHAi
fUhf.
Makers Of High Grade Butter
/'Manufacturer® of
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
ITS'
illlllllilUIUIIIflllUtUIUIISIIIIillHIIIHII
m-%.
V
H*'' u U.
S
Q#
in return a
trial package containing Foley's Honey
and Tar Compound, for coughs, colda
iL»d croup, Foley Kidney Pills and Foley
Cathartic Tablets.—Sold Everywhere.
4-
THE TEST OF ALL
I
3paiTinig vm
East River
Sterling SǤ
Soft
5*..
COAL COAL
r. (A f\
Large and Small BrknUi
Kentucky Lump Spfettt I
Coke
W.KET
1st
iwiiimmnniinwiMi
#:r
'fir.
Vl
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*4** H'^. vsr.* _k r-- 4^,x
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4 v A 1
THE DAKOTA STATE BANK
A
A
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MADISON, S. I
E O E S S A N K -W A K A V Y
jJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllI
The Madison Creamery
JEWESS BROS..
r7?M
a 'ss
Udi
Hf :m
S
HiiHiiiiiiniiiiiiiJ
i*
f'
MADISON, s
?y.
Coml
Pine Kindling
Oak and Maple Wood
Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.
Phone 2343 H. BL.AGEN, Agent
Lump
..v vT-

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