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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, July 14, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1922-07-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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W'
1
IW THE SUES
NOTIFIES CONGRESS THAT HE
#AXNOT LOOK AFTER
OTHER Itl'SIKKMH.
Washington, D. C., July 14—Pres
ident Harding, with the problems re
sulting from two great strikes on
tils shoulders, today sent word to
congress by Senator Lodge that re
publican leaders there must settle
their own legislature tangles. The
president, frankly informed the sen
ator in conference at thf White
'House that he was too busily en
gaged with rail and coal strikers to
discuss the legislative program.
Washington, D. C., July 14—The
-f. «mse of federal troops in the railroad
Strike will be strongly opposed by
jp the American Federation of Labor.
^•^Denunciation of Secretary Weeks'
Chicago, July 14—A strike of sta
tionary firemen and engineers em
"™Tloyed by railroads was authorized
by union heads today. Practically
the entire membership of this union
ts now on strike in sympathy with
the shopmen. Authorization of tli«•
v
•t

•56,
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I
of a
K
$
K
fe
itV*
atrv-
USSIISSItt ATTEMPTS
TO KILL MILLESli
FRENCH PRESIDENT ESCAPES
THMi£*: SHOTS WR£R UX
ANARCHIST.
Barter JWy —An "atia»p§ was
made to assassinate President Mil
lerand, of France today on the
^'hamps Elysiea as he was returning
from a military revie wheld in con
nection with the celebration of Bas
.tile Day. Gustave Bouvet. 23, who
fired three shots into an automobile
"-in which he thought Millerand was
Riding, was arrested after an attempt
f^iwas made to lynch him. Bouvet con
.^jteased he was an anarchist and in
:tended to kill Millerand. Shots were
•^jTired Into the automobile containing
jUiiet ol Police Nat.dins, which was
A100 meters behind Millerand's open
icarriaga. No one Was hit bytfce bul
lets.
Mine
*3"
oWiiers Protest
hid., htiy
i *=union coal mine owners of America
."-ijprotested to to President Harding
^today against his plan for ffttliag
i?the nationwide strike.
lSFind Dead Bodies
-p
I of JVf ait and Woman
u~m*
Woman Murder
bodies
man and a woman, believed to
~:be Charles F. Comstock and his di-
f^vorced
wife, were found in an auto
-Tl.near Minnetonka Mills today. Both
-had been shot through the. tempi
with revolvers.
-IpB 4*g«lee, -Cal:, July 1#—-A
*7^ woman, believed to be Mis. A. L.
Phillips, arrested in Tuscon, Ariz.,
•i Sj today, is wanted here for beating
Mrs. Alberta Meadows, widow, to
death with a hammer after accusing
her of intimate relations with ber
husband.
O w
Two Killed^
•V
...1 -1
in, Auto Accident
V
mm»
mte.
A
I land Smith, of Minneapolis, and Miss
jChrlstine Macintosh, of Brainerd,
Were killed and four companions in
*fured at an early hour today when
a Buick roadster in which they ware
riding turned over six miles east of
here on Oak street road. H. E. Toms,
of Crosby, driving the car, said he
was traveling not more than 15 miles
per hour when the car slipped off
the road. He suffered a crushed
hand.
ACCUSED Of
H^f-IN-I'AW HELD FOR
|)olicy in making the army promptly! ahly latallv injury of his wife. Aug
livailable for strike duty is certain
to be voted at the specially called
meeting of presidents of labor unions
in session today.
Strike is effective July 17. There
are about 14,000 members of this
Union. Most of them work on con
struction and repair jobs. Railroad
managers said their% walkout will
have no serious offact on train
TIOMNG AT Al »TH^
MINNESOTA.
Austin, Minn., July 14—One man
was held here today in connection
with the brutal ax murder 'of John
Wagner at Grand Meadow and prob-
ust Deetloff. 35, of Austin, a son-in
law of the aged and wealthy retired
farmer, was taken In custody by
Deputy Sheriff Ira Hyck, at a dance
hall in LeRoy late last night and
brought here for questioning. The
a«ed pair were found in their home
by a daughter late yesterday. Bloods
hounds trailed the murderer three
quarters of a mile to a vacant lot
where he apparently took an auto
and escaped. Deetloff when told of
the murder at a dance apparently ap
peared unconcerned. Th e authori
ties said Mrs. Wagner probably will
die within a fe whourg.
ARE RESUMED
injcNcttox is gtUxted thi:
NORTH WESTERN ROAD.
and injunction within two days
against the striking railway shop
men in Sioux City was granted Wed
nesday in United States court by
Judge George C. Scott, on petition
of the Chicago and Northwestern
Railway company.
Aside from the fact that the sec
ond writ makes the national officers
of the strikkig shopmen defendants,
as well as the local officers, the re
straining order is similar in character
to that procured Tuesday by the Chi
cago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Rail
way company from Judge Scott.
The scope of the injunction grant
ed to the Chicago and Northwestern
railroad includes Sioux City, Mason
City, Eagle Grove, Cedar Rapids,
Belle Plaine and Hawarden, division
headquarters of the Northwestern.
The second writ follows that
granted to the Milwaukee railroad in
that it forbids violence and sets a
limit of one picket at any particular
point in the railway yards or shops.
It also forbids Interference with any
employes who return to work or ajay
new men employed to take the pjac*
of the strikers.
All the writs against the striking
shopmen issued in Sioux City and
other places follow a decision an
nounced in 0nlted States supremo
court by Chief Justice Taft, in which
lie declares that to place more than
bne picket at any one point consti
tutes an intimidation of employes at
tempting to worIC --I
1 ii"*1"1.1y.rv
7*. "i-'s ,j«
State Auditor Report
for Distribution
Pierre,
JTV
2
Suspect Arrested
July
14—Volume otto of
jthe state auditor's reports which
covers every item of expenditure byfes.
finy department of the state, show
ing who sent the money and just how
{much he paid out for anything, and
when and where he spent it, has
been delivered by the printer, and is
now ready for distribution to any
one who cares enough to ask for the
report.
——o
Tourist Travel
-a
-W-.
Is Heavy
City, July
travel to and through the Black
-Hills Is the heaviest In the history
0f
this region. It ll estimated that
either camped at or visited the tour
1st park In this city since it was op
ened to the public the latter part of
MINES ACCEPT
K
COMPLETE APPROVAL GIVEN ON
CONDITION THAT PUBLIC
OPINION IS FAVOBASlll
John L. Lewis, president of tfcft
United Mine Workers of America,
and other officials pf that organiza
tion, called on Secretary Davis today
and were understood to be endeavor
ing to induce the president, to make
the arbitration proposals apply to all
the partly unionized territory, as
well as the mining area shut down
by the bituminous strike."
So far as the wjllingness of an
thracite operators to settle was con
cerned, Mr. Lewis and "arbitration
in the anthracite fields would be con
sidered by the mine workers along
with the bituminous arbitration pro
posals at the general policy commit
tee meeting Saturday."
Meantime they agreed to the pres
ident's suggestion of paying the wage
rate of March 31, though protesting
that this "would embarrass rather
than assist the efforts to re*tore nor
mal conditions^*
Declaring that the anthracite in
dustry had no problems of part time
employment but had entirely differ
ent conditions of work and ^ing
ihan In the bituminous fields and
1 hat a commission now appointed to
operate should be required to set up
a permanent method by which "wag
es and working conditions in the fu
ture can be automatically adjusted."
the operators asked the president to
name three representatives of the
public on the board, and only one
miner and one operator. This, it was
held, would assure a nonpartisan ad
judication. A decision from such a
commission, they declared, they
would accept, "without reservation
or Qualification.'
11*i.~i»
Million Dollar Loss
Auto Accident
Causes Death
J'
-2:\
SOUTH DAKOTA FRIDA\
MADISON JULY
1—An
Washington, D. C., July 14
thracite mine owners have Submitted
a response to the government's af
ter of arbitration in'the coal situa
tion that President Harding was said
to regard as a complete acceptance.
Meanwhile the miners union add
to a degree, the bituminous coal op
erators, continued to pursue a poll*
cy in which officials said adisposi
tfcon to reject the governments set
tlement plan if public opinion would
approve such a course.
..
tn a Kansas Storm
Wichita, Ka*., July 14—Wind,
rain and hail caused damage esti
mated at $1,000,000 in territory
within a radius of 60 miles of Wich
ita Monday night. Reports received
here indicate greatest damage to
property and growing crops was In
the Eldorado and Augusta oil fields,
where more than 500 oil rigs were
demolished.
tkt-n
liM'l'i't 01 1)11 I
V/hJi ij
Spot, July 14—Walter Mar
better known as "Jake" May, was
fatally injured in an auto accident
between. De Smet and Lake Preston
when the car in which he and four
other men were riding turned over
^wice. May was not driving.
The driven of the car was trying to
overtake a car which had just passed
them and it is thought a front whe,el
Oollapsed, throwing the car into the
ditch.
May was wedged in between the
seats so tight that he stayed there
even when the car was upside down.
The other occupants were uninjur
ed except a few bruises and scratch
They removed the car from his
body and summoned a physician,
when it was found he had a hemor
rhage of the spinal oclumn, being
paralized from the waist down.
Death followed the next day from
these injuries. The injured man was
a little over 30 years of age find
leaves a mother and brother.
-nr
(Will Gravel
Yellowstone Trail
-A,
Aberdeen, July 14 By late fall
the Yellowstone trail through Brown
iounty and the greater part of Day
approximately 3,000 tourists have county, a distance of nearly 70 miles, the time having passed when he can
Mhith
y*
way from Webster, Day county, to
tke Wfsf line of Brown county.
The trail from Webster to Groton
has been graveled since last fall. Th*»
stretch from Groton to James, east
of Aberdeen, has just been com
pleted and the last contract from
James to the west line of Browift
county will be started soon at a coat
Of $57,000,
When th# improvement ia com
pleted it will be possibl for traveler*
to go from Aberdeen to the twin cit
ies almost ^utirely on gravqlad rotdfl
to,OOO
IOWA SLUMPS
LESft ACRES TO BG HAR­
VESTED THAN LAST ml,
UWOUi? HAYS.
Des Moines, la., July 14—Less
corn by approximately 200,000 aeres,
will be harvested in Iowa this year
than last, according |0 the prelimi
nary report on acreage prepared by
United States bureau of agriculture
economics today. Correspondents of
the bureau report a growing condi
tion of 91 per cent of normal on July
1, or about the 10-year average. This
forecasts an average yield of 39.1
bushels per acre, or a total produc
tion of 395.S09.000 bushels, com
pared with 444,190,000 bushels har
vested last year and 473,800,000 har
vested in 1920.
Dry weather up to July 1 in the
West central and northwest districts
caused uneven stand and germina
tion. Oats Buffered from heat and
drought in June to the extent that
the percentage condition fell 11 per
cent to 75 per cent, the lowest since
1911 and 17 per cifet below the 10
year average.
Winter wheaf*be1nn deeply rolled
and well advanced before the drouth
and heat began, has held its own
well the percentage condition July
being 21.4 bushels per acre.
Spring wheat fell off 7 per cent tn
condition during Jnne as a result of
the heat and drouth. The condition
July 1, 79 per cenk is next to 1894,
the lowest on recorw.
Flax in Iowa this year is estimated
at 10,000 acres. The condition July
1 was 84 per cent.
To Spend Millions fe
for Buildings
li ii •••jjfc,v^," "y* ,V
A'liranric tTly, July 14 —Mil
lions of dollars are to be spent for
building during the ensuing year by
the Benevolent and Protective Order
of Elks, according to the report of
retiring Grand Exalted Ruler Wil
liam Wallace Mountain, present at
todays session of the grand lodge.
The assets of subordinate lodges now
amount to $58,099,234, and the elab
orate building program for the year
shows that there are to be erected in
various parts of the country 31 new
homes. This is exclusive of the
Slks national memorial and adminis
tration building which is to be lo
cated ia Chicago, the new center of
Blkdom.
o ""'ify.
§tete Surveyosr
Wqi£ Nch
•*»v
A*--, W
Volga, July 14—Surveyors in the
employ of the state of South Dakota,
who are surveying the Big Sioux riv
er, at present are wprking out of
Volga.
While nothing is known as to the
exact purpose of the survey, it is be
lieved that a part of their mission is
to ascertain the best way of straight
ening the river in order to carry off
flood waters in the spring.
The straightening of the river in
the Volga district also would reclaim
thousands of acres of valuable farm
land which !B annually flooded by
the spring freshets in the river and
for the most part rendered unfit for
the production of crops.
viv
FEW TEftCKERS
BETWEEN 96 AND lOO
4
-f
T® Make Race
Against Joluuon
j*
Aberdeen, July 14—E. C. Ryan
one of the prominent democrats of
northern South Dakota, has an
nounced his candidacy for congress
man from the Second district against
Congressman Royal C. Johnson, re
publican.
will be graveled. Work will be file as a regular democratic candi
atarted in a short time on the gravel-, date, He did this, he announces,
lag of the last stretch of 22 miles, merely to keip the democratic nomi-
will nuAt an excelleflL nktiop from sftoc by irtialt
w* .. 4
He will run as an Independent,
4'
-ft'
NBEDED
SMALL TOWNS
AN*
tiLHAL IH&UUCTS*
Watertown, July 14—Between 9r,
and 100 teachers are needed in the
small towns and rural schools ot
Codington county, If the schools are
to be supplied for the fall terms. Thi
was learned at the county sTTperin
tendent's office when a survey of the
county schools showed that only
few districts have signed contracts
for the coming school year.
While there is a shortage of appli
cations from teachers of experience
holding first grade certificates the
county superintendent's office has 011
file some applications from teachers
of splendid ability and wide experi
ence. Miss Minard fears that a large
percent of these will go outside of,
Codington ocunty to teach unless the
various boards assume a different at
titude in answering applications.
There has been a tendency this year
according to the superintendent, for
boards in districts which are de
manding experienced teachers, to de
lay in signing teachers or acknowl
edging the applications. Miss Min
ard said the
office
That many are leaving the teach
ing profession, while yet others are
taking adavneed work at the normal
to fit themselves for positions in the
city schools, is causing the present
shortage of experienced t«wi»ers
Miss Minard believes.
Dartt sustained a consuccion of
the brain, in addition to a broken le^
and a lacerated ear, while the girl
had one of her ribs fractured and
her collar bone broken, in addition
to numerous bruises and cuts.
Daily Market Report
MAM80N GRAM NARRMT.
At 3 p. m. today—Corn, 45e bai
ley, 40c oatc, 2Cc rya, 44c No.
wheat, $1.17.
Mhuieapolls drain MarkaC
Minneapolis, July 14—Com
Firm to l-2c higher offerings light.
No. 2 yellow 5 to 5 l-2c under Chi
cago September. No. 2 yellowcloa
ed at 58 1-2 to 59 l-2c. No. 2 mix
ed at 57 1-2 to 58 l-2c.
Oats—Oats steady. NO. 3 whites
1 to 3c over July demand fair. No.
3 whites closed at 32 1-2 to 33 l-2c.
No. 4 whites at 31 1-2 to 32 l-2c.
Rye- Firm. No. 2 at July price to
2« over offerings light. No 3 rje
closed at 79 3-4 to 81 3-4c.
Barley—Demand fair to good
choice wanted. Prices closed at
to fiOfc.
'*4
5
Fifty-seven Are
Drowned in Iowa 1
Des Moines ,1a., July $4^*—Fifty- "S
seven deaths by drowning* In the
5
streams and lakes of Iowa so far s
this season, a much greater num#lr
than for the same period last year,
has caused the state board of health
to issue a bulletins on the rules of S
resuscitation for drowned persons,
which will be distributed over
state. When applied promptly
Ffaher and &
the
Black Hawk, ,luly
Dart, a well known rancher of th'*
part of the Black Hills, and his 1T I
year-old daughter, Miss Wiima, had 15
a narrow escape from death and
were seriously Injured when the
horses hitched to a wagon in which
they were returning from a berry
picking expedition, ran away.
I
Oily Uve Stock
Sioux City, July 14—The bulk ot
the lights sold at (10.50 to$l0.60
8ou"1 D*k0U"
[company
1
&
I WE WRITE
a
^lllllllllllllilllllfllllllllllllllllMilli
m-
stands ready to
help any district in securing a teach
er to fit the position and urges the
districts to co-operate and to notify
the office when a teacher has been
secured.
enterprise of her people.
,35
the 5
method, known as the "Schafer lS
method," has proved most sucecss jrT,
ful In restoring liftf'ta persons over
come in the water.
0"
.1...
4'
•ft
5
mm
mm Ji0
1 PHONE 234$
s
light mixed and choice butchers, s LtU&ip
$10.25 to $10.50 medium mixed :g .X""
and good heavies, $9.58 to $lo 5
heavy mixed, $8.50 to $9.25, and |S
packing grades at $7.90 to $8.50. |s
Tlie entire bulk was quoted at $8.2r |E $/*'
to $10.50. Thin sows sold at $8.25 is
and plga at $10.50 to $10.75. Three Is
loads of pigs arrived from Colorado !gf
'i
&
fV
"en"" SlHIUHHUWUlMMMIIIWilllilUt
I
LIFE v
FiRE
LIGHTNING
TORNADO,
HAIL
LIVE STOCK| v
COMPENSATION :-cV
AND ALL OTHER KINTW? OF
INSURANCE AND BONDS. ),.
'IF YOU WANT IT, WE HAVE IT.
State
Madison, S. Dak.
Fundamental
.'V
Resources
America it endowed by nature with many soils, and many
resources. She is fundamentally sound in her institutions
and firmly entrenched in her possession of the basic essen
tials of life and happiness. From her mountains and putins.
her forests and sea coasts, spring those things that are
needed by the world. Prosperity, like the tide, rises and
ebbs, but the wealth of this country is the wealth that en
dures and cannot be long depreciated by surface influences.
This bank has dealt for about forty years with those en
gaged in developing the fundamental resources of the na
tion, and has confidence in the strength
dfitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiitiiiiimiiiiiiii
of
I !Xp& Madison Creamery
Daughter Hurt ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
Makers of High Grade Butt«r
A'
5
S Vi
Manufacturers of 4
Peertlss Ice Cream and Soft D^intc*
"Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
^•IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIItllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilll
I THE TEST OF ALL
Sparkling Gem
East River
Sterling Eggr^
Soft Coal
S
4
Bank
1
1. 1. 'fi-i —-jjuji—-
MADISON, S. D.
t-jt
•i
I
s
the land and the
ji|a|jiai8^prtBwgi
Pine Kindling
if Oak and Maple Wood
|}cranton Hard Coal
Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.
1 Phone 2343 Jf L. H. BLAGEN, Agen
Tlllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
COAL COAL I
Large and Small Briquets
.f
A'
E. W% KETCHAM & SON
i Phone 2338
i'-
A *3
Splint,Lun*
Coke|/,
uis
y
•k
Jv
^4-
Agent

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