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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 02, 1922, Image 1

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COMPROMISE ON
SENIORITY RIGHTS
HAIL EXFATT1VKS PLAN'
UKHAK STHIKT liV IlllllXCJ
NONUNION M&\.
New York, Aug. 2—Strengthening
their nonunion forces, railroad ex
ecutives today planned attempts to
break completely the strike of 400,
000 railroad shopmen. Executives
of 148 carriers are committed to a
policy of no compromise on the sen
iority rights of present employes.
Following the refusal the American
Association of Railway Executives
yesterday to accept Harding's plan
for settling the strike.
Chicago, Aug. 2—Striking rail
road shopmen will acceptt he pro
posal of President Harding for end
ing their strike, undQr way since
July 1, it was announced today.
John Scott, secretary of the Shop
men's union, announced that the
union chairmen, in conference here,
would send a telegram to the presi
dent today announcing their decis
ion.
"We will accept the president's
proposals generally," Scott said. As
far as we have gone, no reservations
or changes have been made, al
though some minor stipulations mav
be contained in acceptance."
Cleveland, Aug. 2—Unless the
strike of railroad shopmen is ended
within 30 days, all railroad unions
including the big four brotherhoods
will become involved. This predic
tion was made in an executive state
ment to the United Press today by
an official of one of the big railroad
brotherhoods, wko requested his
name withheld.
0. S. EXPECTS Willi
flUIM
CONCiltESS WILL NOT LISTEN TO
BRITISH PROPOSAL TO CAN­
CEL OBLIGATIONS.
$
Washington, ». 3.. i
chorus of emphaticness from mem
bra of congress today greeted the
British debt cancellation proposaK
There was every indication that
there has not been the slightst wak
ening of the position taken all along
that the American people expect Eu
i op to repay dollar for dollar plus
interest on the eleven billion dollar
war debt.
BELL. INVENTOR OE
IE.
NOTED SCIENTIST PASSES AWAY
AOE OE 75—WAS HORlf
US SWMNP.
4
Baddock, N. S., Aug. 2—Alexand
er Graham Bell, inventor of the tele
phone, and one of. the countrys most
distinguished scientist, died here to
day at the age of 7f. He was born
in Edinburgh, Scotland, on March 3,
184 7, graduated from several Euro
pean universities and- came to Can
ada in 1870.* Leaving there, he set
tled in Boston one year later.
o
Six Killed When
5 River Tug Blows Up
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New York, Aug. 2 Six' men
were believed killed today when the
tug Edward blew up in the East riv
er In Brooklyn today. The terrific
explosion shattered the ship, which
sank immediately. The ship had
four or more men aboard. Owners
baid
search for the. bodies.wa&.be-
a
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K
Ilic
V
Reed Leads Long^V
for Senate Post
^democratic party and had appareni-f
Iy sained the endorsement of his t»i•
position to former President Wilson,
LReturns from 2,500 precincts gave
Reed a majority of nearly 1,200 over
Tlreckinridge Long. Reed gains to
n-eased as returns from larger cities
were completed.
fb1 Troops Will Protect
Indiana C04I Mines
Indianapolis, Ind., Aug. 2—State
troops moved fro mCamp Knox, Ky.,
into southern Indiana today to pro
tect coal mines opening under state
supervision. Two regiments were
rady to pitch camp somewhere t» the
Indiana fields.
Ill STORMS HIT
Hi
DAMAGE TO OROPH AND LIVE­
STOCK AMOUNTS TO MORE
THAN A MIMJON DOM.AItS.
Cedar Rapids, la., Aug. 2—A liail
storm covering an area two miles
wide and 30 miles long in the coun
ties «'ast of here, early today caused
damage estimated at a million dol
lars to crops, buildings and live
stock. Hail six inches deep Covered
the country.
Dickinson, N. -D., Aug. 2—Hail
and winds last night ruined 75 p-»t
cent of the crops in an area six miles
wide and 30 miles long near Taylor
and Richardson east of here. The
damage estimated at from $200,000
to a half a million.
o
COAL PRICES
CONFESSED SHORTAGE AT MANY
POINTS WHILE EN'D OP THE
STRIKE SUUU NEAR.
New York ,Aug. 2-—Sharp rise in
coal prices' and Increasing shortage
were reported from induslrial cen
ters throughout the United States
today, as the governmeut announced
its fuel distribution scheme will be
in effect in 48 hours.
Promise of peace parleys in the
coal war, now in its 122d day, has
failed to check the serious threat
to the average citizen's winter coal
supply and the menace of shutdown
of industry in som cities, reports to
the United Press show.
"Ten days' supply only," is the
report from many industrial cen
ters, including Cleveland, Dallas and
Philadelphia. Elsewhere public util
ities are slowing to a halt, substitute
fuel is in use while the outlook for
the householder is dark, with deal
ers declining to meet -orders.
A summary of conditions country
wide indicate the government's coal
distributing officials will find:
The northwest on rations and 7,
000,000 tons short of its normal
_________ —uow is- wearing this "jewelry."
-p*-
Puta Drunks to
Work on Streets
Chamberlain, Aug. 2—The city
manager of Chamberlain, L. B.
Laughlin has discovered a sure cure
for the common drupk, which is 30
days at work on the streets.
Some difficulty was found in get- A|»fA TlliAVM
ting the guilty parties to work, so AIIICVCB
the city manager ordered a ball and
chain and the ffrst drunk- a negro
&
kef
•J It is officially announced that in [c
Sftnpas City, Aug. K^-itepudiated future all drunks will be compelled
ky his parly two years ago. Senator to ornament themselves with a ball period
James Reed today led a revolt in the and chain and work on the streeta. thieves are again plying their trade, fore bis breathing was restored.
'A V
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SKYKKAK* rARIiOADft ALREADY
RECEIVED PRODUCT A8-
SKM BLED AT CHICAGO.
Pierre, Aug. 2—South Dakota
wool growers are now making up
their third annual statewide pool
conducted by the oSuth Dakota
Sheep and Wool Growers associa
tion. Several carloads of good fleec
es have already been received by the
#epresentatites of the association at
Chicago and-many more are enrouto
or are being made ready for ship
ment.
The South Dakota organization is
co-operating with wool marketing as
sociations in several other states
jCoal Sheds Burn
mt Rapid City
supply, with coke up $2 a ton in St. 11
he sheds and chute of the Chicago
Paul and $1 a ton in Sioux City,
Acute shortage in certain parts of City at 1 o'clock this morning was
New England, with pea coal $12 a! reported in a wire to United States
ton retail, otlir anthracite coal $15
1
-to flC and bituminous $10 to $13. i\\sna, deputy at the Black Hills ter
Steel mills in the Pittsburgh dis- minal. No details were contained in
trict withdrawing from the open the wire, but Mr. King immediately
market and selling to old customers telegraphed for more details in or
only coal retailers taking no con- der to know whether it would be
tracts for future deliveries price of necessary to order deputies to the
coal nearly doubled. place.
Reserve stocks ab«»t exhausted A message received this afternoon
in Washington, but no advance i*!foy United States Marshal W. H. King
prices. Iwast o the effect that officials at
Bituminous coal reached $11 a ton Rapid City did not believe striking
at Detroit prices up 30 per cent at rail workers were responsible for the
Wilkes Barre, Pa. Soft coal at the fire at that city at 1 o'clock this
mines in Cleveland district quoted at ^morning as a result of which the
$8.25 where it was $*.60 to $3 l»-| coal sheds and chute of the Chicago
fore tRe strike. & Northwestern railway were burn-
Sioux Falls, Aug. 2—Burning of
4k
Northwestern railway at Kapid
Marshal W. H. King from C. M.
ed. The cause of the blaze Is un
known. The first wire received by
Mr. King told merely of the fire.
Fearing that it might have result
ed from the strike trouble, the mar
shal immediately wired for more de
tails. However, according to C. M.
Cessna, deputy at Rapid iCty, every
thing Is peaceable at that place.
o 1"
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MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2, 1922,
in
the disposal of the crop through the.
national selling agency whose head
quarters are in Chicago. The na
tional selling agency has warehous
es located in convenient storage and
Shipping centers throughout the
Country. When the wool arrives
one of these warehouses it is grad
ed and offered for sale direct to the
mills at the prevailing London mar
ket price plus the tariff.
"This system of co-operative woo!
marketing,'' says J. C. Holmes, live
stock and wool specialist in the state
department of agriculture, "is being
backed by county and state farm bu
reaus and throughout the country
and by the leading sheep growers'
organizations in the range districts.
It has proved its reliability by going
through the low wool markets of
19 20 and 1921 successfully and this
year has made the local buyers pay
the farmers many dollars which th^y
would not have received under the
old hit or miss method of selling
their clip."
"The pool's aim," cont^U^ the
Wool specialist, "is to sell «rery
Hiember's wool on its merits at the
World market price at the cost of
Tiandling. and to do this in an ef
ficient manner. The sales agency Is
now amply financed and experienc
ed."
Wool wlllbe shipped to the pool
•Ms season from 1
ho fottowfng coun
ties east of the Missouri river, ac
cording to Mr. Holmes: Clark, Cod
ington, Faulk, Sully, Brookings,
Beadle, Minnehaha, Moody, Miner,
Spink, Deuel, and Day. West of the
fiver promises have been received
from Perkins, Corson, Harding.
Mead. Dewey, Butte, Pennington,
Jackson, Tripp, Haakon and Gregory
counties. Other shipments amount
ing to less than carload lots are ex
pected from several more counties
both east and west of the river, Mr.
Holmes said.
I "The rise In wool prices this
spring caused a lot of pool members
to sell on account of the need of
i ready money," the department man
declared. "However those who
stuck by the pool believe a good
showing this year will wool growers
i next year sticking to their organisa
tion and getting full value for their
(products .. Wool is worth just as
much today at the mills as it has
bMB any time this year."
o
Saturday and Sun$|y saw two thef»^
of Ueal cars.
George Erickson reported the lob
of his 1920 Ford roadster from the
parkspace behind the Smith block.
The car was parked about noon and
had disappeared when Mr. Erickson
I came to get it aout 5 o'clock. It
I had a motor number of 4,626,481.
Some time about midnight the
Paige touring car belonging to El
mer Kegley was stolen from his gar
age located in Brale's addition. The
car was a 1019 model an€ had an
engine number 116,180.
SELLS 5nCER
POLICEMAN SMlTff A*I VETER­
INARIAN PHILLIP* HAVE A
TANGLE OVER PAHKING
PRIVILEGE.
Dai Rapidst Aug*. 2—A mob scene
was staged in Dell Rapids late Sat
urday night when Jack Smith, the
city's policeman, attacked Dr. F. M.
Phillips, veterinarian, on the main
street. Phillips had stopped for an
errand, leaving a friend at the wheel
and the engine rupniitg. Smith or
dered him to remove tlie acr and an
argument followed.. Smith then In
vited Phillips to a nearby corner to
settle the matter. When they reach
ed the corner Smith seized Phillips
by the throat saying. "This has gone
far enough," and began striking
Phillips with his "billy." Phillips
struck Smith in the face with his
fist, then jerked the "billy" from
him and struck Smith with it,
smashing the club and rendering it
useless. Smith then pulled a gun, it
is alleged and Phillips started to get
away, the surrounding crowd open
ing a lane for him to get through.
Phillips dodged into the crowd just
as Smith fired, but a bystander
knocked down his arm so the bullet
went into the ground, then rebound
ed through the lane and nobody was
hit. Bystanders then took the gun
from Smith, who was roughly hand
led.
At no time did Smith attempt to
put Phillips under arrest, but tried
to argue the matter out personally.
Smith's face is badly cut and he has
not been on duty since the fight.
Phillips was unhurt. Phillips Is a
sm^ll man physically while Smith is
of average size. Smith Is an ap
poiutee of Mayor iNsbet but has nev
er been confirmed by the city coun
cil. There is a rumor that Smith has
beeft dismissed by the mayor but this
is unconfirmed.
There was a crowd of more than
100 men who saw the affair, and it
is freely stated today that if Smith
had hit Phillips or anyone in the
crowd with his bullet he would have
been badly used up, as the sentiment
of the crowd was against him. Phil
lips has been one of the leaders in
the opposition to Mayor Nlsbet.
o—
Egan Moves
Out of Home
Falls, Aug.* I Another
chapter In the career of George W
Egan was brought to a close today
when he moved out of the palatial
home at 107 North Summit he has
lived In for the past eight years and
W. A. Buchanan an family moved
in.
Beautifully decorated Inside, the
Egan house has been known as one
of the handsomest residences of the
city. It was built 20 years ago by
J. H. Ramsey who lived in the build
ing until his death. After Mr. Egan
bought the place interior decora
tors were brought from Marshall
Field's in Chicago and-were given
free rein in the big house. As a re
sult of their art, the home was
known as the most elaborately and
possibly the most expensively decor
ated house In the city.
The building was mortgaged by
the former owner some time ago,
and was sold on a mortgage foreclos
ure in the fall of 1920. Since then
Mr. Egan has been renting the place,
but his tenancy was brought to a
close today.
o
Nearly
Working Againjue
j!'
"'aft
ag?
V*1-
Drowns In
Horse Trough
Atl?. 2—Robe#*, the
youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe
McDonald, had a narrow escape
from drowning Friday, when the llt-
fellow fell into a horse trough in
___________ the barn yard. His absence was not
i ed by the mother, who rescued him
Falls, Aug. 2—Altar short) just in time, it requiring several
of inactivity automobila minutes of artificial respiration |#lack demandf or pigs at tfc|*
Jls*
WITNESS DECLARES HE WATCH­
ED LABOR CHIEF—BOUGHT
HIM BULLETS, HE SAYS.
Paygman said he had been assign
ed to shadow Murphy and to cover
the building trades council offices
on May 1, after an outbreak of
bombings and other acts of violence
blamed by the police on union war
fare against a wage mediation
award. For 10 days, he said, up un
il the time of the arrests after tht*
slaying of two policemen by a party
of bombers, he saw Murphy, Mader
and the others every day.
The state announced that it hope-i
by Paygman's testimony to prove
that the man whq drove the automo
bile from which the shots were fired
which killed the policemen was op
erating under the direction at-J.ffco
other defendants.
I
Chicago, Aug. 2—Testifying that S
he had prchased bullets for Timothy E
(Big Tim) Murphy, union labor lead- S
er on trial, wjth Fred Mader, former 3
president of the Chicago building S5
trades council, and three others 5
harged with conspiracy to commit 5
murder, Harry Paygman was qriled E
to the witness stand today. S*
Paygman who said he was former ,2"
a railway detective, testified that jj»
he had conversed with Murphy on S
numerous occasions, and had a con
fidential friendship with the labor 3
leader, startled the courroom when
he calmly admitted that he had been
a special investigator working out of
the office of the chief of police.
iy
Hero Is Beaten
by His Wife 1
Atfwttlc City, Awg. 2—4i#ln
Brown, fireman, disabled by falling
through a burning roof in the Ren
dezvous Amusement park fire las!
fall, holder of a
Carnegie
Hero Med­
al for rescuing five persons fro^u
drowning a few years ago and a war
veteran, had his wife arrested on a
charge of beating him. Magistrate
Fresh held her in $500 ball for the
grand jury.
Brown testified that his wife beat
him with an umbrella, and, after
breaking It, battered him on the
head with a telephone so severely
that he was unconscious in a hos
pital for It hours.
rrappers
Report
Successful Season 1
Tacoma, Wash., Aug. Alaska
trappers whose catches hare been on
sale at auction here for the past few
days, will receive a huge amount for
their furs. The wholesale house act
ing as agent for the trappers said to­|
day the sale was the most succen*
ful ever held here, buyers from all
over the United States and Canada
being represented. Beaver and mar
ten hides comprised the largest por
tlon of the 500 lots on sale, but
tfiere were also many white fox. i
fox, silver fox, muskrat, lynx. mi*k.
otter, ermine and bear pelti* J^uir
brought good prices.
MADISON GRAIN MARXIST.
At 3 p. m. today—Corn, 45c
54c Oats, 22c Barley, 38c wheat.
$1.21.
Mianaapoils Grain
Minneapolis, Aug. 2—Corn—Finn
to l-2c higher, offerings small and
demand good No. 1 and No. 2 1
low closed at 58 3-4 to 59c. No. 2
mixed at 57 to 57 l-2c.
Oats—Steady, demand fair u
good. No. 3 whites 1-2 to lc o\
September. No. 3 whites closed at
29 5-8 to 30 5-8c. No. 4 whites at
28 1-8 to 29 l-8e.
Rye—Firmer, with letdown In of
ferings. No. 1 and No. 2, 4.to 4-12c
Over September demand good. No.
rye closed at 70 3-4 to 71c.
Barley—Steady early, firmer kite?,
with lop lc higher demand1 fair to
good. Prices closd at 43 to 53c.
Sfamx City lire Stock.
-iMiix City, Aug. 2—The day's top
was 10 with the bulk of the good
hogs selling above $9 aftd the bulk
of the packing grades at $7.50 to
$8.25. Out sows sold down to $7.25
and thin sows mostly at $8 to $8.50.
Stags brought $5.50 to $6. Native
pigs sold up to $8. Ther is a very
but there are tew coming.
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WE WRITE—
I LIFE
I FIRE 1
1 LIGHTNING i
I TORNADO i
HAIL
I LIVE STOCK I
COMPENSATION I
I AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF
I INSURANCE AND BONDS.
I IF YOU WANT IT, WE HAVE IT.
Dakota State Bank
Madison, S. Dak.
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliil*tttllllllllllKlllfi (•i:.
Sparkling Gem
East River
5
Sterling Egg
CAPITAL
1 he itivngth ui a linancial institution lies not alone in
its capital and assets, but as much in its honorable history
and ability, the character and standing of the men who con
ducts its affairs.
Standing pre-eminent ~«¥M)«r of these tfeis
bank invites additions to its list of customers.
WE OFFER THE BEST SERVICE ALIKE TO THOSE OF
LARGE AND SMALL MEANS
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I The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BRO&, Proprietors
Makers of High Grade Butter
I Manufacturers
of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks
I Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
PHONE 2341 JBADISON, S. D.
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s THE TEST OF ALL
1. Soft coal ,. -j
Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co.-
1 Phone 2343 L. H. BLAGEN, Agent
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CO AL^CO Alf
Large and Small Briquets
Kentucky Lump i Splint Lump
Cok»
KETCHAM &
Phone 2338
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*Pine Kindling-
Oak and Maple Wood
Scranton Hard Coal
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