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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, August 03, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062034/1922-08-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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HARDING HAS NO IMMEDIATE
PIANH FOR SKTTIJNC1 THE
TWIN STRIKE.
Washington, D. C., Aug.
Whether the administration, Its
peace overtures having failed, shall
fftirsue a hands-off policy
BO
long as
public interests are not seriously
Menaced and permit the giant twin
'strike to be fought out to a finish,
Was discussed today by president
Harding and members of his cabinet.
The president now has no immediate
fglans for sell lenient of either the
failroad or coal strike, and a test of
iirength may be allowed to go OH far
while longer.
Chicago, Aug. 3—A fgresh move
to make peace in the anthracite
fields was announced today by John
L. Lewis, miners' chief. Hard coal
Operators and union presidents prob
jfcbly will meet Wednesday, and a
Settlement of differences is expect
ed.
Events In the railroad walkout
were at a standstill. Strike leaders
«J Chicago, having accepted Presi-.
dent Harding's proposals, looked to
Washington for a new move. Car
rier executives turned their backs on
the White House and pushed step?
to break the strike. Washington
4lspatches indicated that the admin
istration will make no other effort to
intervene in the rail strike at the
present time.
Washington, D. C„ A»g.3—Pres
ident Warding, exercising national
emergency powers, has authority to
in struct receivership proceeding
against the railroads and mines of
the country, and to operate them
III rough federal receivers, according
to the opinion of advisers.
MM BELIEVED'.
SHDT BY CONVICT
TAXI DKIVi:i KILLED IN ARGU­
MENT—POLICE SEARCH FOR
ESCAPED PRISONER.
R«d Wing, Mian., Aug. 3—A
posse emly today was searching
near Wacouta for a man believed to
be Charles Gains, who escaped from
the St. Paul jail last night, and who
J* believed to have shot and killed
Harry Hoffman, a Minneapolis taxl
esb driver, on Main street here ear
ly this morning.
Hoffman picked up the man at the
Minneapolis General hospital last
night and drove him here. In an
argument over the fare the man
shot and killed Hoffman, and ran.
He was seen at Wacouta early today.
Police are certain he is Charles
Gains, who with Harold Watson, a
negro, assaulted Jailer John Brady
at the Ramsey county jail in St.
Paul, last night, locked him in their
eell and escaped. No trace was
f?und of Watsofi. Both war# X«d#r
Jd prisoners.
FRANCE Mir SEIZE
fiERMANT'S MINES
Isjsr*
HM)\
AND *COAL lNT»rsTKIE8
MAY BE TAKEN OVER IE JOV-
EKNMEN TRBPI7BSS TO PAT.
Paris, Aug. 5—France plans to
invade Germany and seize and oper
ate the coal and iron mines in the
Buhr basin if the Berlin government
ft fuses to pay her war debts and
p-ivate claims. The industries now
t«i iho hands of Stines .Thissen and
Irupp, all multimillionaires, will be
Operated by France until all obliga
tions are met, the French press, out
lining Premier Poincaires' plan of
4p»ereioa, declared today*
iff 1A Prnonppf
4*
riUBFcl1
Union headers and road officials fall
id to get together.
,j7
1
Two Arrested on
Murder Charge
Saux Center, Minn., Aug. 3—Big
Joe Hughes and Berney MeTigue,
arrPsted by national guardsmen near
here last night, will be charged with
the murder of Marshal George Well*
at Long Prairio. This afternoon au-j
thoiities there said they probably:
will be accainged tomorrow.
o
EKE
IS PEACE PLI FAILS
RlOTINti RRKAKK OCT IX SHOP
CENTERS—MEN, WOMEN AND
CHILDREN STORM HOMES.
Chicago, Aug.' 3—Widespread vio
lence broke out today following the
failure of President Harding's inter
vention to bring peace in the rail
road shopmen's strike. An employe
of the Illinois Central, who refused
to strike, was beaten to death in
Chicago.- Fifteen strikers were un
fler arrest at Junction,,Mich., follow
ing a riot.
Carl Spradtey waa killed and an
other Injured In ah exchange of
shots at Vanburen, Ark. Striken
were kidnaped in raids on shops :it
Des Moines Men, women and chil
dren stormed homes of carmen in
Lincoln, Neb. Serious disorders
were reported *t other shop cen
ters.
Pill? FOR
.UCOjlL
SFKNtTCIt JiKNOUNCHI 0CHKME
FOI{ DISTRIBUTION OF I-IKL
AFTER CONFERENCE WITH
IHCKETARY HOOVER.
Washington. D. C., Aug. f—Gov
ern men plans Tor distribution ot
coal were announced by Fuel Direc
tor Spencer after conference with
Secretary Hoover and the central
committee appointed by President
Harding. The federal organization
in Washington, he will cover the dis
tribution of available supplies
among the railways, federal institu
tions and states while the gover
nors of the states will handle local
supply.
Provision has been made for the
establishment of district committees
to represent the federal distribution
in the producing fields with special
arrangements for supplying the
great lakes section.
District committees set up in the
coal fields are to consist of a naval
officer, representing the federal
fuel distributor, a representative of
the interstate commerce commission,
a representative of the railroads and
representatives of -the coal operators.
Distribution of fuel for the rail
roads is to be gradually concentrat
ed in the hands of a railway coal
committee composed of coal buyeiev
from the different railway groups.
State fuel committees are to re
port at once the consumption of coal
Ih their territory by utilities, house
hold users and industries, together
with a list of those who should re
ceive priority.
Governor's committees were made
entirely responsible for the preven
tion of profiteering and extortion in
the sale and distribution of ocal with
in their states and will distribute
coal made available to them accord
ing to their judgment.
n
Mother of 18 in
Yankton Hospital
Yankton, Aug. 3—^Seriously ill at
Sacred Heart hospital is Mrs. Wal
ter Myles, of this city. Mrs. Myles
recently gave birth to twins, both
babies dying soon after birth.
Mr.
Myles
states that these ba­
bies brought his family of children
up to 18, all living at birth, with
tour sets of twins among them.
Asked how many living children
had-
i fc I ff
Mr. Myles hesitated a mia-
,ute, and answered, "well, six an
OI oCllienieni, It was easier to count his house-
..M IS hold that way.
Aug. '3—Hope of quick: He has 12 living children, qnlte a
irttle^ient of the surface car and el- family, moat will agree, especially
iivated strike here faded today when
with the mother ill in a hospital.
Only one little girl oftfrlgroup of
ttrins la alive today.
jM'
«£!ic iiladi&on
v
-v. .•' i ,nJ Vv Jr
«.
FILINGS MADE
AVOVBT IS MOT DAY-ONLY
ONE INUEPK\DE\T I'ANDI-
DATS.
Pierre, Aug. 3—August 8 is the
last day for filling of petitions by
I independent candidates, according to
the state law as interpreted by Sec
retary of State C. A. Burkhart. The
law specifies that independents must
lile 90 days prior to the eleqtlop
Which this year falls on November ?.
The ballots will be certified ou|
to the county auditors about August
10 in order that they may have time
to prepare the ballots for the elec
tion
So far Only pne candidate has fil
ed Independently, Emmett 0. Ryan,
of Aberdeen ,as candidate for con*
gressnian from the second congres
sional district of the state.
Unless there are more indepen
dents filed before August 8 the can
didates for the fall election. will be
as follows:
For representative in congress:
First district—-C. A. Christopherson.
Sioux Falls, republican G. L. Has
vold, Madison, nonpartisan John
Stedronsky, Wagner, democrat. Sec
ond district Royal C. Johnson, Ab
erdeen, republican Andrew7 Fran
cis Lockhart, Milbank, nonpartisan
Emmett C. Ryan, Aberdeen, inde
pendent. Third district—William
Williamson .Oacoma, republican
George H. Smith, Reliance, nonpar
tisan George Philip, Rapid City,
democrat.
For goveraft: W. H. McMaster,
Yankton, republican Alice Lorraine
Daly. Mitchell, nonpartisan Louis
N. Crill, Elk Point, democrat.
For lieutenant governor: Carl
Gunderson, Mitchell, republican R.
T. Eastman, Toronto, nonpartisan
F. W. Bigler, Ardmore, democrat.
For secretary of state: C. E.
Coyne, Ft. Pierre .republican A. L.
Uutnant, Timber Lake, nonpartisan
Ed. J. Engler, Ipswich, democrat.
For attorney general: Buell F.
Jones-Britton, republican: O. S. Ha
gen. Huron, nonpartisan J. P. Alex
ander, Brookings, democrat.
For state auditor: E. A. Jones,
Canton, republican Louis T. Thomp
son, Letcher, nonpartisan James A.
May. Pukwana, democrat.
For state treasurer: William S.
O'Brien. Pierre, republican Walter
P. Wohlheter, Slsseton, nonpartisan
D. A. McCullough, Sioux Falls, dem-i
ocrat.
For commissioner of school and
public lands: N. E. Knight, Thom
as, republican O. M. Burcb, Dixon,
nonpartisan S. D. Sharp, Bonesteel,
democrat.
For superintendent of public in
struction: Fred L. Shaw, Huron,
republican Georgianna Youngs Bon
ita, White River, nonpartisan Will
Chamberlain, Yankton, democrat.
For railroad commissioner, third
district: Dawes E. Brisbine, Faith,
republican Orvllle €. Short, Lem
Dion, democrat.
There will also be certified out at
the same time the names of the rep
resentative and senate candidates
from districts comprising more than
one county.
—o
Sioux City Has
Jiecord for Arrests
fUonxCtty. Aug. 3—Out of TOS ar
rests made in Sioux City during the
month of July, 208 were the result
of citizens violating the city's traf
fic ordinance. Names of many
prominent citizens were put PP the
police blotter during July, the rec
ords show.
Although lower than usual, second
place is claimed by the number of
arrests for intoxication. One hun
dred and eighty-five names are reg
istered with intoxication charges op
posite.
Fifty-two cases of disturbing the
peace were brought to the attention
of police and resulted in that many
arrests. Frequenters of disorderly
houses numbered 33, while the num
ber of arrests for gambling was 24.
Seven arrests, five men and two
women, were made during the
month on charges of illegal selling
liquor. Six were arrested tail (kittl
ing in a public place.
Locates Long
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Lost Son
v list*
I
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1922.
knowing that hts bo^ waaa mtiabar
of the organ iaztioui,
o-fe-
The delegation will go to Huron
by auto and will be accompanied by
the band and the Ladies 'auxiliary
of the legion. The members of the
legion will wear their uniforms and
the citizens will be dressed in some
distinctive and uniform fashion.
A definite date for Yankee Doodle
day has not yet been set, but the
local post Is trying to arrange it to
come between August 17 and 21.
An executive committee was appoint
ed last Tuesday which will select the
date in accordance with the arrange
ments for talent for^lhe day. Sev-*
eral novel features are now under
consideration, including a troupe of
Russian ballet dancers, old fashion
ed balloon ascension and parachute
drop into the lake and a slide for life
on a wire stretched from the hotel
reof to the lake.
A telegram has been sent to form
er Judge Landist, of Chicago, in an
effort to arrange a date with him
for a lecture, but no reply has been
received, which leads members of
the legion to believe that he is giv
ing the request consideration.
Several members of the local post
will leave here tomorrow after
noon, probably accompanied by a
portion of the band, for Dell Rapids
to attend Cootie day, the annual cel
ebration of the legion of that place.
TO ASK BEER 10
PAY FOB BUS
CALDER, OF NEW YORK, PLANS
TO OFFER AMENDMENT WHEN
COMPENSATION MRAMUM
COMES UP.
.Washington, D. 3-—An
amendment to the soldier bonus bill
authorizing the manufacture of 3
per cent beer and Kubjecttng it to a
tax sufficient to raise the amount of
the bonus Is being seriously consid
ered in the senate, it became knowa
Monday.
Senator Calder, of New York, an
nounced that he has been studying
the question and may offer such an
amendment when the bonus bill
comes before the senate for consid
eration.
The senator pointed to the results
of recent polla on the beer and wine
question as evidence that such a
change in the Volstead law might be
popular throughout the country. At
the same time he said it would pro
vide a method of raising the neces
sary revenue, thereby overcoming
President Harding's objections to a
bonus bill which does not provide In
apecific terms how the money to pay
the bonus shall be obtained.
If the beer amendment Is Intro
duced it will unquestionably pro*
voke a sharp conflict between thi
ultra drys in the senate who also
favor the bonus measure and those
who would like to see some modifi-
Sleepy Eye. Minn., Aug. 3—After cation of the Volstead law in re
ft search for many years S. S. Riggs, sponse to what they ocnceive to be
of this place, has just, located his a popular demand for the return of
son, Leslie Kenneth Riggs, who dis- beer of low alcoholic content,
appeared from his home in Madison,. Senator Calder estimates that a
Wis., when he was 11 years of age. (tax on 3 per cent beer would yield
Young Riggs, it has just been learn- at least $500,000,000 a year.
H.
i ed, Berved with ntlit In the world
1 war and' upon returning frota
Prance became a member of the Chi
I cago Symphony orchestra as a drum
I mer he toured with the Million Dol-j
lai- band in the name capacity and
now Is heard fro mat Lake Field av
I Mtion station. Amerlcau army, Hon
I olulu. When the baud with which 5
Riggs was playing visited Sleepy jjjj
Eye a few years ago the elder Riggs i
YANKEE DOODLE DAY
FOIJMEH Jl'DOE LANDIS MAY BE
SPEAKER—POST WILL AT­
TEND STATS CONVENTION.
The Bugene McKihbin port of toe
American Legion held a special
meeting Tuesday evening in the leg
ion club rooms to effect plans for
sending a delegation to the state
convention, which will open in
Huron on August 21, and to select a
program for Yankee Doodle day, the
annual celebration of the legion.
"The local post is going to make
every effort to secufe the 1923 state
convention of the legion for Madison
and having the backing of the Mer
chants' association, Commercial club,
Kiwanls club, Company D, and thet
citizens, Madison will be represent*
ed at least 500 strong at Huron,**
said Percy A. Scudder, post com
mander.
A |AY
heard the concert thev gave, not] 2
HER&LLN l'AUK AfKXT
OF PI.KAKl RK AT LAKE
WNDAY.
Hertnnn township community ^ic« 2
nle. will be held Sunday, August 6, S
at Lake Herman park. The pionic 5
dinner will he eaten between 12:30 5
and 1 o'clock. At 2:30 in the pa- 5
vilion a program will be held as fol- 5
tows: 5j
Community singing rending, Miss S
Avery readiug, Helen Keafns bal- S
let dance, Vera Johnson, reading. S
Kathleen Walsh song, Margaret
2
Foley recitation, Roy Foley. S
A brief review of the work ''0t. 5
Herman Township Food club will fee
given. Plans are being made for a
A cordial invitation is extended to E
all other townships. Bring picnic Sj
dinner for your family and join in j?
the dinner at 1 p. m. Coffee eau be S
purchased on the grounds at a reas
onable price, also other refresh- S
meets.
RANCH S0101
EDWARD STENiJEIt TRAIT OF
11 ,(KM AC RES TAKEN OVER
«T JOHN
r.
ROIXJERH. i
.•
V,
St.
JNMGL.
An*. »—Jotra K ltodg- s
er», president of the John P. Rodg
ers Land company, St. Paul, has pur
chased the famous Edward Stenger jr
ranch of 11,000 acres, in Dakota, 30
miles from the northwestern Ne~ S
braska line, for a consideration of E
1760,000, through the largest sin
gle transaction In the history &t s
South Dakota.
The deal was announced in Si.
Paul today, following the departure
for Rapid City of Edward Stenger
and Charles J. Buell, who had been
here completing the transaction by
which Mr. Rodgerg not only acquir
e the 11,000 acres of laud, but. s
thousands of cattle and horses and s
all the equipment of the Battle Sj
Creek ranch. jjS
Half of the land ia under irriga
tion and the remainder has beenig
used to pasture the stock| jS
The ranch is the £»ost highly de
veloped and one of the finest in
South Dakota, and for many years 5S
has been the "show ranch' 'of theig
w e s e n a k o a s I n a i i o n o a s
cash consideration, Mr. Stenger re-|5
ceived some valuable Improved bus- is
iness property in Minneapolis in the|s
trade. The deal was handled through
George H. Randall, of Cedar Rap
ids, la., formerly of Rapid City. S.
d. a-
Daily Market Report
MADISON i« RAIN MAKKEf.
At 3 p. m. today—Corn, 45c rye,
54c Oats, 22c Barley, 38c wheat,
$1^1.*
Mbowiwila Orate Market.
Minneapolis, Aug. 3 Corn
Quiet, easy. No. 1 and 2 yellow at
3 to 4c under Chicago September
offerings light. No. 2 yellow closed
at 58 1-4 to 58 l-2c. No, 2 mixed
at 66 1-2 to 57c.
Oats—Firm to
te
fccttar., No. S
whites 1-2 to 1 l-2c over Septeiu
ber offerings light. No. 3 whites
closed at 29 1-4 to 30 l-4c. No. 4
whites at 27 3-4 to 28 3-4c.
Rye Offerings large, demand
good market firm, with No. 1 and
2 41-2 to 5c over September. No. 2
ryeclosed at 70 1-8 to 70 3-8c.
Barley Unchanged, quiet, with
offerings light. Prices closed at 43
to fi&e. v
S"
1
__
•'»"'I.'':
4^
Sioux Oily live Stttc&.
Sioux City, Aug. 3 -The bulk of
the good hogs sold at $9 to $9.85
with mixed grades at $8.50 to $0
and packing grades at $7.50 to $8
Thin sows sold at $8 and rough sows
on down to $7. Stags brough $5.50
to $6. Native pigs sold up to $8.
"n .."n-L1 "".'i1. 'j.,"..
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i PHONE 2341
9
i.i.!P"i.""iilg|
ternoon and'evening The "ad minion ^ltiflil1il,lllnl1lft111 'If EIIHItltlllllillllllllllllltlllllUIIDtll
will be 15 cents for children and 25
cents for adults. There will be a S
good ball game during the after
5
noon. The Madison band will fur- 5
nish a concert.
N££D
30UNP AWICE
NANCIAt.
Sparkling Gem
East River
Sterling Egg
Soft Coal
x$
"t-
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I WE WRITE-
LIFE
FIRE
LIGHTNING
TORNADO
HAIL
LIVESTOCK
COMPENSATION
AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF
INSURANCE AND BONDS.
IF YOU WANT IT, WE HAVE
Dakota State Bank
Madison, S. Dak.
"Hi'imiimntiiunniiimuiiiiininniniiniHiumtniHiiiiiiminuiniiimnii.HiiiuF
3
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tiiE MOMENT You OPE
on some
IN
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The day will come when you may want sound advice
AN At COUNT
to invest your money, you may wish to GO into business for
yourself, you may desire advice in the administration of an
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is good to know that you can turn for advice and counsel to
this bank—YOUR BEST BUSINESS FRIEND.
This Is the Kind of Service We (iive to Everv Customer
THE FIRST NATIONAL «AM
MEMBfB
FEOrRAt RESfRVt
BANK
MAJDISON, S. D.
THE OLDesr ItJ A HE cc.ifj
£ii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiMiiiiiiiiiiieiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiitilliiiiiiilHllliiliili^illlflllllThniiii:
The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
Makers of High Gfrade Butter
Manufacturers of
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THE TEST OF ALL
4
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks^,,
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
Large and Small. Briquets
Kentucky Lump Splint Lump
.'*5!
r7®
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•JNe
A
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C®ev'
f. W. KETCH AM Si SON
$ Phone 2338
I
Skips, governments and hoard sold HMI»MIIW«ll»»IIIH»HH»»Hi»i»MHMM»lliWINfMliiMMtHIIHIII—tlHHlllHHIWl
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MADISON, S. D.
Pine Kindling
Oalf and Maple Wood
Scranton Hard Coal
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Hayes-Lucas Lumfer Co.
Phone 2343 I* H. BLAGEN, Agent
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