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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 29, 1922, Image 1

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BRITISH 1EMAJ$1 IMMEDIATE 'or the occasion.
WITHDRAW AT, OT TURKS
ffltOM NKITRAL ZO\fc.
Athens, Sept. 29—A party of arm
ed Turks recruited in Constantinople
attempted a surprise attack in the
tteutral zone in the region of Stean
Sh. near Catlaja, but was dispersed
with some casualties, ftgpwding
report* received here.
to
Paris, Sept. 29—Turks carrying
white flags and reversed arms have
advanced almost to the British
trenches and completely hemmed in
the British at Chanak. General
Harrington, British commander, is
making efforts toward a conference
With Kcmal to learn the intentions
o e u k s e i i s e n
trenched and backed by waship ar-1
tillery, are prepared tor desperate I
resistance if the Turks advance.
Contantinople, Sept. 29—The
Turkish infantry is in possession of
the entire Chanak area except at
Mmicircle section fifteen miles deep
around the tow uof Chanak which Is
held by entrenched British, it was
reported today. Masses of Kemalist
infantry continued to pour IRIO the
neutral section of the Btraits.
London, Sept. 29—The British
government toda instructed Gen
eral Harrington at Constantinople to
demand immediate wlthdiawai o?
Turkish troops from the neutral
«One. Official announcement was
made following receipt of word that
Kemal had promised to ecue him ad
vance in the zone.
Paris, Sept. 29—The Sultan
Turkey, Mohammed sixth, has abdi
cated in favor of his cousin. Prince
Abdul Bedjid, an unconfirmed re
port from Constantinople states. An
other report said Mohammed had
decided to abdicate but acceptance
Was held up pending word from
Huseapha Kemal.- nationalist Mwwfr
4r.
Bank Robbers
i&cape with Loot
Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 29—Work
ing under gunfire, bandits number
ing at least five, terrorized the town
if Plnewood, 15 miles north of here,
Marly today and robbed the People's
State bank there of $1,100 in cash
lind a large amount of Liberty bonds.
Bay Thompson was wounded by
feuckshot when he and his brother
engaged in a battle with the ban
dits. Three blasts wrecked the safe
ttnd blew out one half of the build
tog. The bandits escaped in an au
tomobile. They are believed to be
jfifre same gang that robbed a bank
Hannes, near here, Thursday
•jiiorning and the state bank at Men
tar recently.
Oppose Program
Coal Profiteering
Washington, D. C. Sept. 29—An
attempt to wreck the government
program against coal profiteering to
be made shortly is being made by
ft small group of operators, accord
ing to reports. An injunction against
•the interstate commerce commis
sion's right to deny cars is to b3
sought soon on the grounds that the
provision is unconstitutional.
o
Bandits Take
City Pay Roll
Vancouver, B. C., Sept. 29—Three
masked bandits held up Robert Arm
strong and W. P. Scheeley on the
city hall steps today and escaped
with $76,000 representing tfce «ity
payroll.
Educator Dies
from Injuries
Alexandria, Sept. 29— Miss Jessie
Ijftobertson, superintendent of schools
H»f Hanson county, died at the M. E.
|icapital in Mitchell Saturday eve
ting as the result of injuries receiv-
Id in an automobile accident on th^
jltreets of Alexandria about four
greeks ago.
The young lady was closl&f her
v
if,
I third term as superintendent ui
schools of the county, and waft a
{candidate for the same office at the
(coming election. She was a most
highly respected young lady and had
rendered valuable service to the
schools of the county.
I The funeral was largely attended
lat^the local Methodist church, the
.schools of the county being closed
GETS DECISION
THE CHILD IN THE CASK PRO­
NOUNCED LEGITIMATE BY
THE COURT.
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Sept. 29
Mrs. Fifi Potter Stillman today was
awarded the decision in her fatuous
divorce action with Jaiues A. Still
man, millionaire and former presi
dent of the National City bank, in a
decision of Referee Daniel J. Glea
son filed by him in the county court
at Cartnel, New York, and mad,"
public here.
-j
The following points were utade:
Proof does not show that Mrs. Still
man was guilty of adultery witn
Fred Beauvais, Indian guide the in
fant boy. Guy Stillman, is the legit
imate child of James A. Stillman
and Mrs. Stillman, and not the child
of Fred Beauvais. The plaintiff,
James A. Stiiiman, was guilty of
adulterv with Helen Leeds and has
two children by her. The refere"
decided there was not sufficient
proof to show that James A. Still
man also associated with two other
women known as Helen and Clara.
USED PAf
DELEGATES WHO PERFECTED
NEW ORGANIZATION AT #*.
GET 1IF.TTER WAGE.
Sh Paul, Sept. 29—Increased pay
has been granted Great Northern
railway shop workers through nego
tiations between officials of the road
and delegates who perfected the new
system organiation of shop crafts, it
was announced here today.
Negotiations of the new wage
scale and working rules and comple
tion of the new shop workers' or
ganiation which supplants the unions
called out on strike July 1 were
completed today. The new union
represents 8,000 shop workers from
seven crafts on the Great Northern
system throughout the northwest,
union officials said.
The new wage scale has a higher
range than that established by the
United States railway labor board
and the new working rules were de
clared ythe delegates of the union
to be more favorable than those pre
vailing previously.
The new wage scale Is 72c an
hour for first class mechanics and
runs as high as 85c for highly skill
ed mechanics. The Great Northern
is the first railroad in the north
west whose employes have organ
ied a system association in conform
ity with the suggestion of the laboi
board.
Lead Miner Has
Skull Crushed
Lead, Sept. 29—While at work on
the 1,550-foot level of the Home
stake mine, Thomas Alfred Lunberg
was struck on the forehead over the
left eye by a heavy rock, which fell
from a chute he was engaged in
drawing and his skull was crushed,
the unfortunate man dying in a few
minutes from his wound.
His body was brought to the sur
face and taken to undertaking
rooms.
From what can be learned of the
accident it appears that the young
man was engaged at work on the
1,550-foot level of the mine and a
chute which he wae drawing became
hung up. It was believed that it
would have to be blasted to start the
rock running, and he had Just en
tered the chute prepared to do the
blasting when the rock started to
run. One of teh heavy pieces struck
him over the left eye and crushed
his forehead as stated above.
ITU'S HERQES
TRAVELERS PASSING THROUGH
WASHINGTON NEVER FOR­
GET TO SEE MEMORIALS.
Washington, D. C., Sept. 29
Homage to Washington and Lincoln
is being shown by more than 1,000,
000 people a year. Washington's
home, Mount Vernon, the mecca of
virtuaHy all Americans and foreign
ers who come to Washington, is be
ing rivaled as a shrine by the beau
tiful Lincoln memorial, while the
Washington monument is the most
popular of the three shrines.
Visitors numbering 34,112 went
during July to the top of the Wash
ington monument, conveniently lo
cated a few hundred yards south of
the White Mouse. More thaa one
fifth of them clambered up the SH8
steps in order to see the memorial
tablets on the various landings in
side the shaft. The remainder rode
to the top in the electric elevator
which has a capacity of 35 persons.
'More than 5,250.000 people have
visited the top of the monumen
since it was opened for observation
purposes October 9, 181W, Mo en
trance fee is charged.
The Lincoln memorial, recently
completed and opened to the public,
v» a* visii. by 31,383 persons during
July, Located in Potomac park di
rectly west o fthe Washington mon
ument, it is rather inaccessible for
pedestrians, visitors usually go
there l» automobile. On a recent
Sunday 2,000 persons were record
ed as entering the great building.
It is rapidly becoming a shrine for
tourists. No entrance fee is charg
ed.
General George Washington's old
home at Mount Vernon on the Poto
mac river in Virginia, 16 miles fron
Washington, long has been the mec
ca of pilgrims from every part of the
world who go by steamboat, elec
mic train and automobiles. Kept as
I" irly in Its original state as pos
sible by the Ladies' Mount Vernon
association it is a delight to all
Americans. During July approxi
mately 29,000 persons visited Mount
Vernon and during the fiscal year
admissions numbered 236,000. A
25-cent entrance fee helps to keep
the estate in first class condition.
Arrests Cause
Double Wedding
Sioux Falls, Sept. 29—The termi
nation of the Rice-Brantingham
Flanigan case, which had its incep
tion in the municipal court yester
day morning, was the marriage al
tar yesterday afternoon with Judge
J. T. Medin of the circuit court as
the officiating matrimonial knot
tier instead of the judge pronounc
ing sentence.
Mrs. F. J. Rice, who originally
gave her name as Wright, Miss Eva
Rice, Merrill Brant ingham and
Charles Flanigan had been arrested
in a raid by the police on a down
town room, charged with prostitu
tion. At the morning session of the
municipal court Tuesday all four
had stoutly proclaimed their inno
cence and the case was continued
until 4 o'clock to permit the police
making the arrest being present.
When 4 o'clock arrived the four ap
peared armed with marriage licenses
for the marriage of Mrs. Rice and
Flanigan, Brantingham and Eva
Rice. The display of these mar
riage licenses, however, did not de
ter Judge Martin Bergh from going
ahead with the hearing in the case,
«md at the end of the hearing all
four were found guilty. Mrs. Rice
was fined $50 and the other three
$25 each, which fines were paid. It
was then that the marriage quartet
marched to the county court house
where they were united in marriage.
o
Veterans Promised
Pension Increase
Washington, D. C., Sept. f•—A
pension pay envelope increase from
$50 to $72 a month for Civil and
Mexican war veterans possibly as a
Christmas gift from Uncle Sam is
planned by republican leaders ill
congress. A bill providing pension
increases already has passed the sen
ate and Senator Bursum, republi
can,- New Mexico, its author, says he
has been promised by house republi
can leaders it will be passed by the
house soon after it reconvenes. He
expects the bill to become law be
fore the holidays.
All Civil and Mexicaa war veter-
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,1922
ans having ved 90 days or any
who have developed disabilities
would receive the increase of $50 to
$72 a month under the bill and their
1
widows' pensions would be increas
ed from $30 tii $50 a month. Other:
beneficiaries tinder the bill include i
Civil war army nurses who would
receive $50 a month while pension
ers of the liuM&Q wars would re
ceive $30 afvd theft widows $20 a1
o n
i
V OF PAST
ill
BASHFUL YOUTHS ARE PREFER-
RED RV GlltLS TODAY, IS
VERDICT OF JUDGES.
Chicago. 111., Sept. 29 The old
time caveman idea of a perfect lov
er has been supplanted by the mod
ern version of "Faint Heart Always
Wins a Fair Lady," nowi n feminine
favor along with bobbed hair, short
skirts and rolled hose.
In the scenarios of 19,000 women
submitted in a contest conducted by
a large Chicago newspaper, the bash
ful hero outnumbered the bold and
fearless one eight to one, acocrditig
to James Shryock, director of the
competition.
"This was a *revelatloa to the
Judges who we're famous authors,
directors, educators, dramatic crit
ics and actors," he said. "They
with conventional literary opinions
believed women in real lire worship
ped the leonine, dashing, confident
type of hero, choosing him for her
husband when his assurance and
possessive manner had captured her
heart.
"But the stories showed unmis
takably that women, when given a
chance to express their real likes and
dislikes as they did in this contest,
many of them writing under non de
plumes, prefer the stammering, wist
ful, abashed lover rather than the
caveman type."
They are careful to draw the dis
tinction between timidity and fear,
Shryock said- .The. great majority
of heroes were retiring in manners
and backward In approach, but
brave in morals and, when aroused,
courageous in physical combat.
This was attributed by some Judg
es to the fact that women prefer be
ing worshipped to being mastered.
Others were o fthe opinion that this
showed women want husbands who
would be too bashful to flirt with
other women. Shy men don't desert
their wives, they said. Still others
declared this signified woman's na
tural desire to mother and protect
timorous men.
Criminal Cases
on Calendar
AberdMB, Sept. l»-wTw»-thirds
or 66 per
cent
cases on
or 13 out of the 20
the
criminal calendar for
the term of the circuit court of
Brown county, which convenes on
October 2 are based upon charges of
violation of the prohibition laws.
The calendar for the term contains
175 entries, 40 of which are for pro
ceedings in the naturaliation of for
eign born citiens, 20 are criminal
cases
and the remainder are 'Civil
actions.
The calendar contains fewer cases
in which divorce is the object than
any calendar for some time.
Auto Thief Halted
in Nick of Time
Watertown, Sept. 2$—To aee a
stranger driving away with her car
while her baby was sleeping peace
fully on the back seat was an excit
ing moment for Mrs. Matt Suttor, of
Waverly, while shopping
in
Water-
town. She came out of the Schaller
store just in time to sde the car be
ing backed away from the curb and,
supposing the driver was her bus
band, caHed to him to wait and she
would take the baby. When she
reached the side of the sedan she
discovered the driver was a strang
er, who admitted he had
mistage and got out.
Weather Prophet
Predicts Mild Winter
Fort Dodge, la., Sept. 29—A beau
tiful fall and a mild winter were
forecast to by Eugene Dunning,
Fort Dodge's weather prophet. Dis
agreeing with the famous Black
Hawk Indian who forecast a severe
winter, Mr. Dunning stated that he
believed that the Indian had missed
hia forecast this year as he did last
14£OLA MAN AliSO TO RACE
TRIAL FOR GRAM) LARCENY
—»AID TO HAVE STOLEN
TATTLE.
Leola, Sept. 29—John B. Hoff, of
this city, who was arrested recent
ly on a grand larceny charge involv
ing the butcherin gand selling of
stolen cattle, was given a hearing on
a charge of burning his meat mar- i
ket in February to defraud insurance I
companies.
He waived examination and was
bound over to the December term of
court in McPherson county under
bonds of $1,500. This Is the arson
charge which has been Investigated
by H. N. Walker, of Pierre, deputy
state fire marshal.
Previously Hoff was bound over*
to the circuit court under bonds of
$3,000 on the charge of stealing and
butchering cattle afler an investiga
tion had been made by N. J. Foljom,
of Sioux Falls, deputy state sheriff.
After two witnesses had been exam
ined in this and he was bound over.
Bond was furnished on this charge
and Hoff is now seeking to raise the
other $1,500.
Hoff's arrest followed careful In
vestigation by State's Attorney *Fol
som in regard to the disappearance
of cattle and hogs on near by farms
and the finding of carcasses of the
animals in the pastures after the
meat had been taken.
Matters were brought to a head
a few weeks ago when thieves butch
ered a farmer's steer in his pashre
at night, while the farmer himself,
looked on and was held at bay with
guns until the butchering was fin
ished and the meat taken away in au
auto.
o
16 New Instructors
at Aberdeen Normal
Aberdeen, Sept. 29—When the
Northern Normal and Industrial z
school opened for Its twenty-first
year of work on Sept. 18, new In
strncfors joined the faculty, for the
coming year. These instructors are
all people fully equipped so far as
training and experience are concern
ed. Many of them have carried
their education to the extent of M.
A. or Doctors' degrees. Dr. Foglrt
is to be congratulated upon the
splendid choice he has made in fill
ing these positions. The enrollment
as yet incomplete, is ahead of »hnt
of last year.
Lion Trainer
Badly Injured
Mitchell, Sept. 29—Steve Baity,
trainer in charge of the Beckwith
lion act, a street attraction of the
Mitchell corn palace, was severely
injured by one of the lions during a
performance today. Batty's skin was
lacerated by the lion's claw and one
of his fingers was nearly bitten off.
The lion, which attacked the train
er, was the youngest beast of the
eight in the act. It was brought
from Africa last spring. Attendants
were able to drive the animal from
Batty with pointed iron bars, how
ever, before It inflicted fatal injur
ies.
Daily Market Report
Local Grain Market.
'Reported at 3 p. m. today: Corn,
44c Oata, SSc Barley, 49e| By*.
52c.
Minneapolis Grain Market.
Minneapolis, Sept .29—Corn-HNtow
2 yellow closed at 58% to 59 %c.
No. 2 mixed at 57*4 to 68%c.
Oats—No. 8 whites closed at
to 35 %c. No.-4 whites at 31% to
33 ^c.
Rye—No. 2 rye closed at 66 c.
Barley—Prices closed at 47 to 59
cents.
Flaxseed—No. 1 spot closed at
$2.21 U to $2.22% and to arrive at
92.19*.
81
on* •fcttr titve mock tfartret.
flioux City, Sept. 29 Lights sold
at $10 to $10.15, with light mixed
and medium butchers at $9.25 to
$9.75. Strongweight butchers and
desirable mixed sold at $8.50 to
$9.25. Smooth packers brought
$7.85 to $8.25, and heavy packs
down to $7.59 and nrfitr. Stags
brought $6.
I
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WE WRITE— I
LIFE
FIRE
LIGHTNING
TORNADO
I HAIL
LIVE STOCK
COMPENSATION
AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF
INSURANCE AND BONDS.
IF YOU WANT IT, WE HAVE IT.
Dakota State Bank
Madison, S. Dak.
IIT111IIIHI III11II»I i IIIIK11H i HIIIIII! Mil IIIIUHII11IIIIIM111H H'i it Mill IIIS ilil!IIHttF
y,\v .irmmi .-nnM'.t ninnan»«niniMi
/F YOU
BANK MTH US
When you open uaim tu^uum yuui uilia are paid by
check. Your check, when returned, becomes a receipt. No
trouble about change, no disputes about payments, no ques- jj
lions as to where your money has gone or how much you s
have received. Your pass book tells the story. s
Be on the safe aide and open an account with us today 1
dJIitlllllllSillllttlllllllllllHIIItllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinilllllllltllllHIIIIIIIIHIlf
The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS., Proprietors
Makers of High Grade Butter
Manufacturers of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream
PHONE 2341 MADISON, S. D.
iiHi!:i!:.i::i!i!:s im ::iiiini i:iir'in!iiiiiiii!iimniii!iiniiiiiiiiiillllllllllllHinilli
THE TEST OF ALL
Sparkling Gem WJPine Kindling
East River Oak and Maple Wood
Sterling Egg Scranton Hard Coal
Soft Coal
I Hayes-Lucas Lumber Co. I
Phone 234# L. H. BLAGEN, Agent
^lllillillllillililllllllUllillSnillllllilllllllllMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIllHIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIR
Beesley Dray Line
Does All Kinds Haul'ng, Moving Household Goods,
etc. Sand, Gravel atul UUrk Dirt fy* S*l+ #4
On Short Notice.
Drs. Kellogg & Allison
ROY BEESLEY Phone 3772
Duvcin Q1Tnr^uaWIRING,
aaison
Ptn SICIANS and SURGEONS SUPPLIES
Telephone 2133 Madison. S. center St. u.
Stii/ "i
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7Accounts
1
for ev£Ry I
NO GUESSWORK
ABOUT MONEY MATTERS
1
A. A
HE COUNTY.
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FIXTURES, MOTORS

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