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The Madison daily leader. [volume] (Madison, S.D.) 1890-current, September 30, 1922, Image 1

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BOTH IHK BRITISH AND THF
TVRKS 1SSI K I'l/TIMATl'M.
Constantinople. Sept. 30—With
tfct British and Turks on the verge
Of war in the neutral zone, General
Harrington, British commander
chief, dispatched a new demand to
Mustapha Kemal today that he evac
uate the Chanak area. It was un-!
derstood no time limit was set.
The allies are also in receipt of
Kemal's acceptance of an invitation
to meet in a preliminary peace par
ley at Mudana. This note was hos
tile in tone, also, and demanded
that both eastern and western
Thrace be evacuated at OQC and
turned over to the Turks*.
Paris, Sept. 30—The Kemalists
must occupy Thrace immediately to
prevent Moslem massacres by Greeks
Ferid Bey, Turk representative here,
stated today. Ferid Iky gave this
as a reason for the occupation of the
neutral zone of the straits.
Athens. Sept. 30 -English an
Greek shops in Constantinople ar
being pillaged by Turks in a spor
adic outbreak, acocrding to report-?
pcotred here.
o
Mexican Revolt
at Juarez
El Paso, Tex,, Sept. 30—Five per
sons were reported dead and 2f
wounded when the garrison at Juar
ea, across the Rio Grande, revolted
early today and fighting broke out
between revolutionists and Mexican
federal troops. Later reports to im
migration officials Jaere were that
Obregonists had regained control,
driving the rebels from town. Strav
shots fell on the American side of
the bridge, killing Ruise Pente, aged
18.
o
New York Democrats
in Convention
Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 30—Having
nominated Al Smith for governor
and Dr. Royal S. Copeland for Unit
ed States senator, delegates to the
democratic state convention dispers
ed today, wondering whether their
party organization is going to be
split by W. R. Hearst. Hearst with
drew when it became apparent Cha*.
Wi Muchhy, of Tamany Hall, Ttt de
termined to support Smith.
New Suspect in
Hall-Mills Case
New Brunswick, N. J.f Sept. SS
Dlscovery of an important clew prob
ably leading to the arrest before
nightfall of a uian alleged to be in
volved in the Hall-Mills murder
mystery became known today. Su»
pect is a man not hitherto mention
ed in the case. Preparations are go
lig forward today for an autopsy on
tile body of Rev. Hall.
New York Apartment
House Burns
New Yor., Sept. 30— With seven
Hfrsons dead, several more dying
and twelve others suffering burns
«»d broken bones, the blackened
fflns of an uptown apartment house
were searched today for additional
victims of a fire which swept
through it shortly after midnight.
Heartrending scenes were witnessed
the flames engulfed the structure.
Auto Thieves Get
$600 in Silk
Sprlnprfleld, Sept. —Catting a
fcole In the glass in the rear door of bestowed by General John
the thieves made their escape with
their booty in an automobile. A
posse of deputy sheriffs, upon learn
ing of the robbery, scoured the sur
rounding hills, but could find no
trace of the thieves.
THE CUT LIKES
CALLED Vim MIDNIGHT
The
dispatch of a fresh ultimatum fol
lowed the receipt of an ultimatum I
from Kemal in which he demanded
that the British evacuate the Asiat
ic side of the straits. Kemal's note
had closed the door to peace.
NIGHTS—IH VIKWFIH WITH
ALARM.
St. Paul, Sept. 30—Fuel distrlbu
tion authorities today looked upon
the lake seamen's strike with alarm.
A
Leaders of the regular f*publl
can organization headed by formal
Governor Edward I. Edwards, the
democratic candidate for the sena
torial nomination vns unopposed in
the. primaries.
Editor Is Fined
and Imprisoned
Des Moines, la., Sept. 30 Austin
Haines, editor Of the Des Moines
News, was lined $1 and sentenced to
one day in jail for contempt of court
today. Haines was cited for con
tempt for editorial comment on the
phraseology of Judge Helmes' decis
ion.
ffce building occupied by G. F. ing, but owing to VB&voidat1e cir- versy arose.
Buche, general merchandiser, and
1
Si Bilk, or about 12 bolts.
Tracks uear the store indicated done by French officers.
cumstances, the general notified tho
then opening the door, thieves Wed- i Mitchell Corn Palace management a. Smith, as attorney
Sfsday night stole about $600 worth that he would be unable to attend
BI6 Gill BATE
CUTIS
MILWMKKi: BAII.ROAD
»I\KK FLAT PRICK OF 1tt
CKNTS FROM SIOUX (IT*
TO CHICAGO.
Sioux City, Sept. 30
ant victory for Sioux
complete tieup of shipping worfl.li City by M. King, president of tht
probably paralyze northwest indus Western Terminal Elevator com-
try within a few weeks. Lake ship
pers declared boats would be kept
IN NEW JERSEY
FRKLINGHIYHEN INTESDH
TO
FIGHT ON THIS GROUND AF­
TER VICTORY TUESDAY.
Trenton, N. J., Sept. 30—Prohibi
tion is to be the principal issue of
the forthcoming senatorial campaign
in New Jersey, United States Sena
tor Joseph Frplinghuysen declared,
following his renomination in the
primaries over George Record, of
Jersey City, by a majority estimat
ed at from 80,00 Qto 100,000.
"Mr. Record's vote, particularly
in the outlying districts, was large
ly a protest against prohibition,"
Frelinghuysen said at his headquar
ters at Baritan today. "Prohibition
will be the principal issue of the
campaign, but it will not be the only
one."
With one exception Frelinghuysen
carried every county in the state by
substantial majorities, including
Record's home county.
An import
City grain
dealers is seen in the plans of tho
Milwaukee railroad to make a flat
rate of 16 cents from Sioux City to
Chicago on grain shipments originat
ing in southern South Dakota, east
ern Nebraska and northwestern
Iowa, effecteive within a month, ac
cording to advices received in Siou\
pany.
Tho territory covered by tho con-
moving despite the strike called for cession is practically all Sioux City
midnight. Reports from Washing trade territory «nd means a rapid ex
ton show coal receipts al lower lake
1
pansion of th*1 market here, Mr.
ports the first four days of this i King explained. A large amount of
week exceeded the quota and mount-j grain from nearly 85 stations in Ne
ed to 1,600,000 tons. This has braska alone, together with ship
either been unloaded or is ready for ments from many other points iu
unloading. The problem is whether South Dakota aiul Iowa, instead of
boats can be manned to carry it a
the upper ports.
ISSUE
minim
being transported via Omaha to Chi
cago and St. Louis, in the future
will flow through Sioux City, it is
said.
Through the elimination of ail ar
bitrages on Milwaukee lines in this
territory, which the change grants,
dealers here will be given the same
advantages as Omaha dealers by a
reduction of 5 cents a 100 pounds
on all the grain offered from these
points, according to Mr. King. At
the present time Sioux City operat
ors are working under the handicap
of the alleged discrimination, It is
pointed out.
In other words, the concession
will make the rate from Nebraska
to Chicago via Sioux City the sam
as the Nebraska rates to St. Louis,
Mo., via Omaha, and will give Slouv
City an even break, Mr. King said.
The movement to procure the con
cession had been sought for a num
ber of years, according to Mr. King.
Hay Haulers
Demand Raise
Presho, Sept. 30 -Hay hauling
came to a sudden stop at this plac-j
when the haulers went out on a
strike for more pay per ton hauled.
They wanted $2.50 for a ton when
they had received $2. The truck
drivers can haul from two to three
and a half tons at each trip and us
ually make two or more trips per
day. The team haulers use four
horses and usually put on more than
Governor Stokes and former United three tons per load. While the team
States Senator Baird, declared Fie- haulers do not make as many trips
linghuysen's victory was an endorse
ment of the Harding administration,
as President Harding is a close per
sonal friend of the New Jersey sen
ator.
per hay they have less expense than
the auto truck drivers.
The shippers say they can not pay
any more for haulage at this time of
the year on account of the hay not
being so good in color. The earlier
cut hay looks greener, sells better,
though not any better in quality,
but does not receive the cut in price
that the later cut grass receives and
I for this reason the shipper has no
idea of the grade which his product
will receive and if he pays more for
hauling will lose money on the
II
Huron Doctors
Are Decorated!
ransaction.
By the last of the week it is ex
pected that the new haulers will be
brlngin gin the big loads as usual
and that the shipments will con
tinue although for some time It
looked as though the shipping
would be discontinued for the year.
Quarrel Over
Cemetery Drinks
Minneapolis, Sept. tfS
(ments
The decorations were to have been at a total cost of $105. When he
J.
served to volunteer workers
of the parish in lieu of water while
I they plied the task of sprucing up
Huron, Sept. 30—Dr. Jay Spink the cemetery, and payment for them*
and Dr. O. ft. Wright, both of this has split the congregation of Si.
city, were decorated at the Mitchell Mary's Russian Orthodox Catholic
Corn Palace by representatives of! church here, and today is scheduled
the French government under or- to bring the contending factions In
ders of that government's war do- to district court before Judge Geo.
partment with the Croix de Guerre W. Duffington.
for "heroic service in administering Members of the parish spent two
aid In the front lines under fire on (or three hourB each evening during nights except in the extreme south-
October 12, 1918, while attached to the summer weeding the burial eastern part of the state where th*
a French infantry regiment in its grounds. Drinking water was not first part of the week was cool and
drive on the Aisne river, during the easily accessible so Frank Dusenka, showery. Sunshine was abundant
World war. Dr. Spink's decoration member of the board of directors of The weather was ideal for
bears a gold star. the church, purchased refreshments work
Persh- Bought reimbursement,
1
allegei
MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 192&
ly illegal in Minnesota, but against
i individuals on "the hip" is the ans
WILL
1 wer the
attorney.
E
BRITISH AGRICULTURISTS DIS­
SATISFIED WITH MFAGER
ItEWARD FOR LAItOK.
London, Sept. HO—"Farmers and
their laborers everywhere are pro
foundly dissatisfied with the meager
reward accorded to their loil," writes
the labor correspondent of the Dally
Mail, as a result oi a tour of the ag
ricultural districts in England. "It
is true that farmers are notorious
grumblers," he says, "but there can
be no doubt that at the present time
they have exceptional, perhaps un
precedented, cause therefor.
"Through some gross and glaring
defect in our distributing methods a
monstrous proportion of their labor's
just wage Is falling into the pockets
of profiteering middlemen, and little
or nothing of it goes to the actual
workers and producers. The result
is that the farmers are unable to
afford decent pay to their laborers,
aud are even compelled In many
cases to dispense with paid work al
together. Consequently the state
has to maintain thousands of men
in idlenep, sat a cost of millions of
pounds, while the land is beiim
starved in productiveness for lack of
labor.
"At the same time, in the vital de
fensive business of self-feeding, thr
country is losing all that it gained
during the war. Most of the land
which was under the plow is return
ing to permanent pasture In 1918
we had 12,309,000 acres of arable
land last year we had, only 11,309,
000. eYt the grass land is 1,401,
000 less than in 1914, and the total
area of both crops and grass has di
minished by more than 1.000,
acres."
Fire Sweeps
Pasture Lands
Watertown, Sept. 30—Hay an.l
winter pasture lands, stubble and
fencing over hundreds of acres
the Lee Stover ranch southwest
Florence and on four adjoining
farms were swept by a disastrous
fire that was driven before a stiff
breeze and for a time threatened to
wipe out farm buildings that lay in
its path. Neighbors gathering from
miles around with teams and plows
raced with the flames in a success
ful effort to plow firebreaks about
the buildings and the loss was thus
confined to the burned hay and pas
tures and the destroyed fencing.
The fire started about noon from
a hunters' camp fire, according to
the report brought back by Lee
Stover after a trip of inspection over
the burned area.
Five miles of cedar post pasture
fencing was destroyed on the Stover
ranch and hay and pasture land
were burned on the Carlson L.
Thompson, Tom Carroll and Keyes
farms.
A field st winter wheat checked
the fire and saved the building! on
the Stover ranch and efforts of the
fire fighters saved other f&iii_ I nild
ings la the path of the fife.
Weather Is Ideal
for Farm Work
Huron, Sept. 30—Following is a
summary of weather and crop condi
tions in South Dakota for the week
ending September 26, as supplied by
P. G. McGinnis, observer:
"Tim past week was warm and
dry with rather warm days and cool
1
the contro- fa seed are beLig harvested. Some $7.50.
fall plowing is being done but the under.
the ceremony and the decorating was congregation it is alleged that the is in fine condition but is beginning, Thursday trade. Heavies sold al1 rmsu^iAwa ano
purchases were such aa were not on­ to be fed and marketed." $8.60 to $8.75.
LAKE SAIL1S
SffliKE SHI
i
the principles and teachings of the
Russian church." 1
The defendants declare they Me I
the insinuation that they purchased
"moonshine." If it were true that
moonshine did appear at the oeme
tery gatherings, it'was brought by
I
ttarottsii tMr
V
i* i
KVKRY TVPK COWFYANCK WILL
*RFSSF|» INTO fS&RVICIJ
in:
TO MOVE COAL.
Chicago, Sept. 3®—Every avail
able type of car will be pressed iu
to service to move coal to the north
west when 5,000 Great Lakes sea
men go on strike next Sunday, rail
ro&d officials declared today.
Present coal carrying equipment
already taxed to capacity to
make
up the fuel deficit caused by the
miners' strike is Insufficient rail e\
ecutives admitted, to meet the
mauds of long hauls which will
made upon the railroads when Inkc
transportation stops.
The federal fuel administration E
If the boats stop running, the
northwestern roads will have to send
their cars al Ithe way to the east
frn mines instead of the distributing
point at Duluth. The eastern road:?
will have to take their cars used in
the short haul traffic between the
mines and ake Erie ports, and
send them loaded on the longer
haul. These cars probably will riot
be enough to meet the emergency.
but other cars will have to be used
in the emergency."
Parts of $50,000
Loot in Field 1
Sioux Falls, Sept. 30—The police
report the finding of one of the two j"
trunks containing diamonds and
jewelry, valued at upwards of $5i),- J:
000, which were stolen from the Mil js:
waukee railway depot in this city on it:
September 15. The recovered trunk \l
was found concealed in a corn field
near town, with the contents nearly!
intact.
Another part of the loot valued at
several thousand dollars wad discov
ered today in a Sioux Falls garage
where it had been concealed by
members of the robbers' band. Whll'
the police refuse to give the value of
the diamonds and jewelry loot thtii
far recovered, It is estimated that
one-third of the original loot of up
ward of |50,000 has been reco\ered.
The search for the other trunk
and the remainder of the loot is be
ing vigorously prosecuted.
Cut to Death in
Threshing Machine||
Belle Fourche, Sept. 30—Wiley
Drlscoil, a young man about 30
years of age attempted to walk
across a threshing machine working
about five miles north of Hulett,
Wyo., 40 miles west of this city,
slipped and fell Into the cylinder,
resulting in one leg and one arm
beinm almost severed from his body.
He was rushed to Hulett but diel
befoie amputation of either limb or
arm could be effected.
Daily Market Report
Local Grain Market.
Reported at 3 p. in. today: Corn,
44c Qata, Sic Barley, 43c Rye,
52c.
Minneapolis Grain Market.
Minneapolis, Sept. 30 —Corn—No.
2 yel!jow closed at 58 to 58%c. No.
2 mixed at 56% to 57c.
Oats—No. 3 whites, 2 to 4e over
December. No. 3 whites closed at
33% to 34%c. No. 4. whites at
31% to 33%c.
Rye—No. 2 closed at "i5Hc.
Barley—Prices closed at 47 to 51
cents.
Flaxseed—No. 1 spot closed lit
$2.23% to $2.24% and to nrrive at
42.21^.
continued. Corn, potatoes and alfal- $8.50. Rough sows sold down to
5
I
Sioux VUf Live Htock Market.
Sioux City, Sept. 30-—-The shipper
farm'bulk was quoted at $9.75 to $10.10
Some haying and threshing and the packer bulk at $7.75 to
Boars sold down to $2 and
Pigs sold at steady price#,
In the complaint filed by George! ground generally is too dry for this The top for light westerns reached *Q_ a h:~-T^~
Smith, as attorney for John Re-, work. The dry weather, continued to $10.50 on Wednesday and heavy IVcllUjfg gC IIISUII iuaUlSUilJUIWlrlt^vS*
sheter and 14 other members of the Injure meadows and pastures. Stock westerns sold at $9.75 on the piJ\ c|/",f a wc nnrl SITRt,FONS^^^ rlXTUKJSJ4, MvTwKo
Sparkling Jem
East River
Sterling Egg
Soft Coal
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WE WRITE
has announced that at least i non r*'*nilllHIHIHIIHIIIIilimHIHlllllllllHIHIIBIIIIIIIIIIHUHHIHIHIHIIIIIimiHCIIIMllllllf^
000 tons of coal a week must be un- ^IIIIIflllllllllinilllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIVIIPIllllltfllllllllltllfllllltlrilltVllfVVHfflfmtlItt
loaded at Duluth and other north
5
em ports from now until the clos*
of navigation unless the northwe-t
is to suffer a serious shortage.
"There is always a general car
shortage at this time of the year dii"
to the great crop movement,*"• tail
S. M. Felton, president of the Chi
cago Great Western and spokesman
for western rail heads, "but .as £«ir
as coal carrying equipment goe.-j,
there is no shortage reported.
of
LIFE
FIRE
LIGHTNING
TORNADO
HAIL
LIVE STOCK
COMPENSATION
AND ALL OTHER KINDS OF
INSURANCE AND BONDS.
IF YOU WANT IT, .WE HAVE IT.
Dakota State Bank
Madison, S. Dak.
Your Pass Book to Success
Awaits You Here
Before you can hope to become a factor in the
community or business life of Madison YOU
MUST SAVE MONEY. It is the one simple rule
necessary to success, for in accumulated savings,
not only are you protected in case of adversity,
but you are also in a position to take advantage
good investment opportunities
We welcome your account.
Interest fnftf on
Savings Deposits
to
gjumtiliiliiiillliiiiliiiiiltiiiitiliiillllllllllimillllilimiiiiliilliiiliilliiiliiiiiimiiiiiiiyg
The Madison Creamery
ROGNESS BROS^ Proprietors 1
Makers of High Grade Butter
5 Manufacturers of
Peerless Ice Cream and Soft Drinks I
Highest Market Price Paid for Cream I
3
5
I PHONE 2341 MADISON, S. D. I
rrfiiuiiHiiiiiiiiir!(iiii!iiiiiiiiiii!ifiiiH!iiiniHinimiintuiimimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii(i|
I THE TEST OF ALL I
i Hayes-Lucas Lumber
Phone 2343 L. H. BLAGEN, Agent
^Hiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiig
Telephone 2133 Madison. S. D. i©4 Center st. H.
.i.• .•*
Dray Line
Does All Kinds o* Hauling, Moving Household Goods,
etc. Sand, Gravel and Black Dirt For Sals. Delivered
On Short Notice.
ROY BEESLEY Phone 3772
n iDi\ir piytitpwo
,-J,
5
a
I
i
5
SS
Pine Kindling
Wood
Oak and Maple
Scr^jaton tj^d Coal
Co.
AND SUPPLIES
v
'v*. js*".
ummq
PlNMM Ml
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