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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, December 14, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1906-12-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE STANDARD
BY C. C. KNAPPEN,
SISSETON, SOUTH DAKOTA.
NEWS OF WEEK SUMMARIZED
IMPORTANT
EVENTS AT HOME
AND ON FOREIGN SHORES
BRIEFLY TOLD.
Washington.
Commissioner of Immigration Giant
in making a clone inquiry at Honolulu
Into Portuguese immigration into the
Hawaiian Islands.
The National Business league has
adopted and forwarded for introduc
tion In congress a resolution fixing
the presidential term at six years.
The president lias announced that
he will reappoint Judson 0. Clements
a member of the Interstate commerce
commission. Mr. Judsons term ex
pires Dec. i1.
The president has commuted to iifo
Imprisonment the .sentence of death
Imposed upon Arthur Adams and Rob
ert Sawyer, negroes, convicted of mu
tiny and murder on board the schoon
er Henry A. Berwind.
The government, traffic report shows
the movement of freight, for the sea
Bun to date to be 00,192,8155 tons
through the canals at Sault Sto.
Marie, or nearly (1,01)0,000 greater
jthan for the corresponding period last
year.
Criminal.
J. G. Rawlins and Alf Moore, a ne
gro, were hanged at Valdosta, Ga., for
the murder of Willia and Carrie Carter
In July, l!)0f.
Mrs. Rosa Tewsbury, aged thirty
years, was found dead at Logansport,
Ind., under circumstances indicating
murder. A former husband Is sus
pected.
At Herkimer, N. V., the jury in the
•, trial of Chester 10. Gillette for the inur
dor of his sweetheart, Grace Brown, at
Iiig Moose lake on July 11, returned a
iverdict of guilty in the first degree.
William C. Anderson, collection
teller of the First National Bank o£
Kansas City, is missing and E. P.
tSwinney, the president., admitted that
'he was short $9,000 In his accounts.
Ina and Minnie lllll, sisters, were
found asphyxiated In their rooms at
Portland by Hilda Hill, another sister.
The dead girls left a note bidding
Hilda farewell, but It does not state
the reason for their act.
The traita robbers who fatally
wounded the express messenp/rr of a
Cotton Belt train near Eylny siding,
Tex., secured $110,000 from the mes
senger's safe The Pacific Express of
ficials refuse any Information..
Casualty.
Four children were burned to death
at their home near Westfield, N. J.
The little ones were at houie alone
when the house caught fire.
Train No. 36, on the Monbn roard,
was derailed two miles north of Frank
fort, Ind., by a broken rail. Eighteen
passengers out of a total of 175 on the
train were injured.
Fire at Conneaut Lake, Pa., de
stroyed three of the largest summer
hotels and several frame buildings, and
for a time threatened the entire vil
lage. The loss is estimated at $30,000.
Patrick Eagan, a former employe of
the Baltimore & Ohio road living at
West Newton, Pa., near where the
Baltimore.& Ohio train was wrecked,
has been placed under arrest, charged
with wrecking the train.
Eight girls employed in a match fac
tory at Indianapolis were seriously
burned and injured and several others
were slightly bruised in a panic fol
lowing the explosion of an air-tight
compartment in which thousands of
patent matches were stored.
Wascaaa, the largest notel next to
the ruined Windsor in Reglna, Sask.,
has been destroyed by Are. The
building had Just been erected and
men were at work on the interior fln
IshingB. The IOBS will be in the neigh
borhood of $75,000 to $100,000.,
Personal.
John W. Himebaugh, a pioneer lum
berman of Oshkosh, Wis., died at Phil
adelphia.
Flora Batson. known on the concert
stage as the "Black Patti." is dead at
Philadelphia.
Miss Cora Wilburn, well known as a
Jewish poet, died suddenly at North
Duxbury, Mass.
Nathan M. Flower, a member of the
New York stock exchange, died sud
denly of pneumonia,
Capt. Thomas Fuller, veteran ship
wilder, died at New Salem, Mass.,
^ed ninety-three years.
George E. Cole of Fairview, Wash,
jd to be the first governor of Wash
Jton territory, is dead.
Gen. L. Victor Baughman. one of
tie Democratic leaders of Maryland,
ed suddenly at Frederick.
Richard J. Garvey, representative
:t from the Second Missouri dis
t, died at St. Joseph ot pneumonia.
[, fter a courtship of forty-four years
Ophelia Humphrey and W. D.
tin, living near Milton, Ky., have
been married.
«roy F. Toumans, attorney general
^outh Carolina and one of the moBt
iliant orators of the South, died at
[tmbb, 8. O.
Grip, minister of Sweden t6 the
States, hal^been recalled.\ He
igton for iev«ra)
retirement
„s\
Chlaf Justice Andrew P. Wlswell of
the Maine supreme court, died sudden
ly In Boston of heart disease.
George B. Nicholson, chief engineer
of the Cincinnati Southern railway,
died at his homo at Covington, Ky.
Mark Hassler, widely known
throughout the country as a musician
and composer, died in Philadelphia.
From Other Shores.
The attitude of President Roosevelt
in regard to the San Francisco anti
Japanese question is warmly praised
at Tokio.
The Tokio correspondent of the
Ixmdon Times telegraphs that the
Japanese army scheme signifies an In
crease of nearly 50 per cent.
The negotiations for a commercial
treaty between France and Spain,
take the place of the treaty which has
just expired, have been postponed in
definitely.
The 2(I(ith anniversary of the inde
pendence of Portugal from Spanish
dominion has been celebrated by the
signature of a treaty between the two
countries, delimiting their respective
frontiers.
The latest acquisition to the Im
perial opera house at Vienna is a for
mer chimney sweep of the name ot
Klcnson. He was cleaning the chim
ney of a rich customer, who was at
tracted by his voice and had it culti
vated.
Prince Frederick Charles von Ho
liei.lobe, a son of the former German
chancellor, has started proceedings
to cause the arrest of Philyip Simonei
de Flores & Dixmer, a firm of so-called
lrinkers, on the alienation of having
swindled him out of nearly $100.nun
by means of fictitious financial opera
lions.
Otherwise.
A Japanese training squadron will
visit the United States, arriving at
San Francisco on Feb. 18.
The personal estate of the late Carl
Schurss, according to the appraiser in
the surrogate's olfice, is $255,150.
The Oxford and Cambridge boat
clubs have decided to decline the in
vitation to row at the Jamestown ex
position in 11)07.
Paymaster Charles R. O'Leary of
the Tennessee denies the reports of a
mutiny -among the stokers on that ship
during the president's trip to Panama.
G. F. Bodley of London and Henry
Vaughn of Boston have arrived in
Washington to prepare plans for a
new cathedral which is to cost $2,01)0,
00U.
Under rather unfavorable conditions
the first-class battleship Vermont had
her screw standardization tests at
Rockland, Me., and came fully up to
expectations.
Thomas McCarthy, a clerk in a hotel
at. Newcastle. Pa., and his brother.
Michael, have just received word that,
an uncle died in Australia leaving
them $3,000,000.
Robert Carden of Web'ster City, la.,
aged seventy years, and Mrs. May
Bunnell, late of South Dakota, aged
seventy-one years, have been granted
a license to marry.
In a motion filed in the circuit court
at Findlay by the State of Ohio in its
suit against the Buckeye Pipe Line
company, the court Is asked to order
the production of all the books and
vouchers of the Standard Oil com
pany.
At a mass meeting of negroes at
Steubenville, Ohio, a Foraker club was
formed to boon the senior senator
from Ohio for the presidency in 1908.
An endless chain of letters was also
started urging the negro voters all
over the United States to organize at
once for Foraker.
Count Hans von Hochberg, a mem
ber of one of the proudest and richest
noble families of Germany, has filed
at Canon City, Colo., declaration of his
intention to become a citizen of the
United States. He emigrated to this
country after marrying a clerk in a
Berlin store against the wishes of his
family.
A LONG ROOT.
Reached From Victim's Tooth to His
Leg.
An Irishman, with one Jaw very
much swollen from a tooth that he
wished to have pulled, entered the of
fice of a Washington dentist.
When the suffering Celt was put
into the chair and saw the gleaming
forceps approaching his face, he posi
tively refused to open his mouth. Be
ing a man of resource, the dentist
quietly instructed his assistant to
push a pin into the patient's leg, so
that when the Irishman opened his
mouth to yell the dentist could get at
the refractory molar.
When all was over, the dentist
smilingly asked:
"It didn't hurt as much as you ex
pected, did it?"
"WelJ, no, reluctantly admitted the
patient. "But," he added, as he ran
his hand over the place into which
the assistant had inserted the pin,
"little did I think them roots wint
that far down!"
Schoolma'am Elected Justice of Peac*
Miss Lena Ham, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. William H. Ham of Ray
mond, Uniop-county, Ohio, was elect
ed Justice of the' peace at .Picton,
Colo,-, on t^9 Republican ticket by an
overwhelming majority.
jMlss Ham Ti beautiful and accom
plished and was for seven years a
teacher of the Bchools In Union coun
ty, teaching her first term at the ag
of seventeen -yean. She is now twen
ty-six, and teaches. In the public
school at Picton.
LUMBER TRUST TO
TAKE ITS
OF MORE GENERAL INTEREST TO
ALL PEOPLE THAN ANY PRE­
VIOUS INQUIRY.
INDICT TWO FOR PERJURY
HARRIMAN ROADS AND GOULD
CORPORATIONS ARE INDICT­
ED AT SALT LAKE.
Washington, Dec. 9.—The investiga
tion of the lumber trust, as proposed
in a resolution offered by Senator Kit
h-edge, is regarded by members of
congress as of more general interest,
to all the people than any previous in
quiry of the kind. Every household i'l
the country where furniture is use:!
Is interested.
Farmers in such states as do nol
produce timber have reached a point
where they are helpless. They cannot
afford to pay the high priccs demand
ed for lumber, and improvements have
been checked. This is especially trun
in the Dakotas and other prairie
states.
"Gentleman's Agreement."
The lumber trust, operates through
several organizations. Through thb
system, operated under a "gentleman's
agreement," competition has been en
tirely eliminated. No portion of the
country has been overlooked and all
the lumber product of the United
States Is controlled by the lumber
trust.
The capital of the trust, according
to the last census, is $11,000,000. Lum
ber is the fourth largest Industry in
the country, being surpassed only by
the steel and iron, Ilie textile and the
meat packing industries.
PROBE NAILS HIGH OFFICIALS.
Grand Jury Believes They Held Back
Facts When Witnesses.
Salt Lake CP.y, Dec. «). —The federal
grand jury that, is investigating coal
land frauds in Utah and charges that,
railroad corporations have discrimi
nated against certain shippers made a
partial report yesterday. Indictments
were returned against the Union Pa
cific Railroad company, the Oregon
Short Line railroad, the Union Pacific
Coal company, the Utah Fuel company
and several of the highest officials rep
resenting the Harrimau and Could
corporations in Utah.
The indictment against the Harri
man interests charges violation of
the interstate commerce law, VfTfeging
discrimination against D. J. Sharp, a
coal dealer in Salt Lake City, who
was forced out of business after he
had cut prices below the prices
charged by other dealers in coal.
The representatives of the Gould In
terests are charged with defrauding
and attempting to defraud the United
States government, the charges being
based on the methods pursued in ac
quiring title to coal lands in Utah.
FIRE AT CORNELL.
Seven Lives Are Lost in Destruction
of Fraternity House.
Ithaca, N. Y„ Dec. 9. The Chi Psi
fraternity house at Cornell university
was destroyed by fire at an early hour
yesterday morning. Seven lives were
lost. Of these four were students and
the others prominent townsmen who
were acting as volunteer firemen. The
bodies of the dead, with the exception
of two, were recovered. It has been
decided to dynamite the ruins to fa
cilitate the search for the missing
bodies.
The awful catastrophe has thrown
not only the university but the whole
town into mourning.
Among those earliest on the scene
and who contributed most of the work
of rescue from the flames, which had
already converted the first floor of the
doomed dormitory into an inferno,
were several Cornell football men. All
did effective work.
The cause of the fire is unknown.
The building is an unsightly wreck,
with no particle of its inner furniture,
remaining.
NEGROES VICTIMS OF PLOT.
Soldiers Were Victims of Anti-Negro
Conspiracy, Says Negro.
New York, Dec. 10. Declaring that
his investigation exonerates every one
of toe three companies of negro sol
diers of the Twenty-fifth infantry, re
centiy dismissed from the army for
shooting up the town of Brownsville,
Tex., Gilbert Stewart. colored, return
ed from the Southwest yesterday,
armed with affidavits and bristling, he
savs. with facts that absolutely con
trovert the reports of army officers.
Attet Knocks Out Walsh.
Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. ?.—Abe At
tel of San Francisco, featherweight
champion of the world, last night won
a decisive battle from Jimmie Walsh
of Boston, knocking him out ii the
eighth round.
Czar's Gold Stolen.
Irkutsk, Siberia, Dec. ft.—The gov
ernment assay office here was -ehtered
by means ot a tunnel last night* and
gold weighing 165 quarter pounds was
stolen. There is no trace of the rwhv
toers. fj*" 'Jl
V* 7
7
v.
PRINTERS WASTE U. S. MONEY
EVIDENCE OF EXTRAVAGANCE
COSTING $15,000,000 IN FIFTEEN
YEARS.
Washington, Dec. 10—A complete in
quiry into the administration of affair*
at the government printing office is to
bo made this winter by the house com
mittee on appropriations.
A member of congress noted for his
conservatism estimates that mlsman
agenient, resulting in extravagance
and all kinds of criminal waste, hat
cost the government in the last firteen
years more than $15,000,000.
Recently a subcommittee from the
house committee on appropriation
made an unofficial inspection of the
printing office, and the things they saw
there point unerringly to tlie conclu
sion that there has for years been a
criminal waste of the public money in
printing office management. In an
unoccupied room there was found
stored away discarded type worth
$75,000 if sold for old lead.. Most of
this type was in perfect condition. In
another room was found more than
165,000 pounds of new type, bought ten
years ago and never taken out of the
boxes in which it was delivered. Dis
carded machinery worth thousands ol
dollars and in perfect condition was
found in rooms devoted to old junk.
FIVE SOLDIERS ARE KILLED.
Later Report of Fight With Pulajanes
Is Received at Manila.
Manila, Dec. 9. According to the
latest reports from Capt. Samuel
Ham, concerning the recent fight on
the Island of Leyte, between an Amer
ican force and Pulajanes, a detach
ment of Company L, Eighth United
States infantry, with a force of con
stabulary, under command of Lieut.
Ralph F. Yates, Jr.. was rushed by
sixty bolomen, four miles from La Pas,
on the Tarragona trail, on the after
noon of Dec. 5. The Pulajanes had a
few guns, from which they fired a vol
ley, and then rushed the troops. In
the onslaught five American soldier3
were killed and nine wounded. T'":
enemy lost thirty killed. The numtier
of the wounded and of the prisoners
taken is unknown.
A detachment has started in pursuit.
JAPS AND RUSSIANS READY.
Aair in Far East Is Loaded With Elec
tricity—Both Are Stronger.
London, Dec. 10 Simultaneously
with the announcement in the Kngiiaii
newspapers that some of the Lloyd's
underwriters have been insuring,
against an outbreak of war between
Russia and Japan, ir. DOT at guinea:
per cent, Col. Gaedke, whose articles
and letters in the Rerliner Tageblatt
during the war attracted universal at
tention, writes for that journal a re
markable article on the military posi
tion in the Far East. Col. Gre.lke says
the time for a renewal of hostilities is
not yet. He says there are clear
signs that the air is loaded' with elec
tricity, but tlie financial conditions ot
both Russia and Japan will postpone
hostilities.
Meanwhile Russia's military posi
tion in the Far East has been consid
erably bettered. She had only eighty
eight battalions there before the wai
now she has 187.
TO EXCLUDE JAP LABORERS.
Treaty Will Be Arranged by Secretary
Root and Ambassador Aoki.
Washington, Dec. 10.—A treaty be
tween the United States and Japan
will be arranged for tho exclusion of
Japanese laborers. This definite de
termination has been reached by Pres
ident Roosevelt, lie has abandoned
the alternative plan of congressional
legislation.
The negotiation of the treaty will
be conducted here. The intentiou is
to submit the convention before the
adjournment of congress, March 4.
The document will be arranged by Sec
retary Root and Ambassador Aoki
The president has had the plan in
mind for several days, but he was not
informed until yesterday afternoon by
Ambassador Aoki that the government
of Japan would welcome the exclusion
of her laborers from the United States.
MARLBOROUGH WANTS TRIAL.
Duke Is Planning to Take His Alleged
Wrongs Into Court.
London, Dec. 9.—The Marlboroughs
even with the good offices of kinfolks
on both sides, have thus Ear been una
ble to come to an amicable arrange
ment on the custody of the children,
who naturally feel desperately the sep
aration from their mother, with whom
until a month ago they had spent
practically all their lives.
The duke has had frequent and long
consultations in the house of lords cor
ridors with Sir Edward Carson, former
solicitor general, who is his leading
counsel and whose enployment in the
suit creates the expectation that the
duke intends to bring his alleged
wrongs into court, as Sir Edward is
noted for his hard fighting qualities
as an advocate rather than as an ad
viser.
•J Try to Hang Negro on Train.'
Topeka, Kan., Dec. 7. Two Texas
cowboys tried to hang Jbhn E. Lewis,
a negro on a passenger train between
Lawrence and. Topeka. The cowboys
said they did not like to see a negro
"putting on airs."
Lost Hunters Are Found.
Chicago, Dec. 7. News came to
Chicago yesteTday concerning the fate
of J. S. Lincoln and D. R. Caldwell,
lost while, moose hunting above Lake
&uj>erior.'',.?ft'hey'
been rescued.
are alive And have
Vi -O Ji
SAVS MR. STORER
MISSTATES fAflS
PRESIDENT REPLIES AT LENGTH
TO ATTACK OF FORMER AM­
BASSADOR.
MAKES UNTRUE STATEMENTS
NEVER AUTHORIZED EFFORTS TO
ADVANCE ARCHBISHOP IRE­
LAND.
Washington. Dec. 11. President
Roosevelt last night made public a
long letter addressed to Secretary
Root, giving correspondence between
the president, and Former Ambassador
Bellamy Storer and .Mrs. Storer, in
which lie says that Mr. Storer's refusal
to answer his letters and the publica
tion of various private letters justified
the ambassador's removal that Mr.
Storer's publication of private corre
spondence was peculiarly ungentle
manly, and that ho (the president) had
stated with absolute clearness his po
sition-—tile reason why it was out of
the question for him as president to
try to get any archbishop made cardi
nal, though expressing his admiration
for Archbishop Ireland, as well as lead
ers of other denominations.
Should Know Facts.
He says he thinks it well that the
members of the cabinet should know
certain facts, "which he (Storer)
either suppresses or misstates."
He says he did not resent the action
of the Storers "until it became evi
dent that they were likely to damage
American interests." i-le says Mrs.
Storei urged him to give her husband
a cabinet place and thai she stated
Mr. Choate at London and Oen. Porter
at Paris were not proper persons to be
ambassadors, suggesting her husband
in that connection. The president in
corporates a letter from Postmaster
General Oorlelyou contradicting the
statement that President McKinley
had commissioned a gentleman to as!:
the pope "as a personal favor to him"
anil as an "honor to the country," to
appoint Archbishop Ireland as cardi
nal.
Storer's Statement Untrue.
The president declares that Mr.
Storer's statement that he authorized
any such message to be delivered to
Pope Pius is untrue.
The president's action last night fol
lows the publication of "the confiden
tial pamphlet" which Mr. Storer last,
week sent to the president, the cabi
net and the senate foreign relations
committee.
OIL TRUST IS NO PET NOW.
Standard Oil No Longer Gets Illegal
Rates From Railroads.
Washington, Dec. 11. The annual
report of Commissioner of Corpora
tions James R. Garfield, made public
yesterday, devotes special attenton to
the investigations of the transporta
tion of oil and the operations of the
Standard Oil company.
In his report the commissioner says:
"A most striking and important re
sult. immediately followed the investi
gation of the bureau the railroads
canceled substantially all the secret
rates, illegal or improper discrimina
tions, and in many cases the discrimi
nations in open rates. The shippers
of oil advise the bureau that for the
first time in many years they are now
rapidly obtaining equality of treat
ment from the transportation compa
nies."
TO WRECK COLISEUM.
St.
Louis Building Where Cleveland
and Parker Were Nominated.
St. Louis., Dec. 11. The contracts
have been let and work will begin
wrecking the St. Louis exposition
building, an historical structure which
included the coliseum in which the
conventions were held which nomi
nated Cleveland and Thurman in 1888
and Parker and Davis in 1904 for pres
ident and vice president, respectively,
on the Democratic ticket.
CASTRO IS DYING.
President of Venezuela Has No Chance
of Recovery.
Fort de France, Martinique, Dec. 11.
—Relable advices received here from
Venezuela set forth' that. President
Castro was moved down to the little
seacoast village of Macuro, near La
Guayra, last Monday. He made the
trip from Caracas in a bed. It is gen
erally believed that he has no chance
of recovery.
Attempted Train Wrecking Charged.
Moosomin Sask., Dec. 11. John
Janes, a seventeen-year old boy living
near Red Jacket, has been arrested on
a charge fo attempting to wreck the
Imperial Limited on,the Canadian Pa
cific at Coot Hill siding.
Cornell Mourns.
Ithaca, N. Y., Dec..-ll..—A memorial
service for the four students and three
others who lost their lives in the lire
that destroyed the Chi Psi fraternity
lodge was held in Sage chapel on Cor
nell campus yesterday.
Anti-foreign Riots.
Shanghai, Dec. 11. Revolutionary
and anti-foreigner-riots have broken
out. at„{,Uigk^te.ag,«iu.-the province of
Mniins'ind other foreign­
ers employed in the coal mines are
fleeing to Chang Sha.
2*
1
Spill
jji. vi
-ij*
SHOOTS SENATOR
FORMER SENATOR BROWN OF
UTAH IN A PRECARIOUS CON­
DITION.
Washington, Dec. 11.—Former Sena
tor Arthur Brown of Utah was shot
Saturday by Mrs. Anna Bradley of Salt
Lake City and is in a very precarious
condition. The doctors announced
yesterday that he had a chance for re
covery, but his friends admit that
there has been a change for the worse
and that his recovery is doubtful. It
is feared that blood poisoning will set
in.
Mrs. Bradley when arrested said: "I
was fully justified in doing what I did.
I loved the very ground he walked
on."
Motive of Attack.
The cause of the shooting, so far as
Mrs. Bradley will say, is that Senate
Brown is the father of her two chil
dren, and that he refused to marry
her despite his repeated promises to
make her his wife. She said that Sen
ator Brown had been instrumental in
the divorce between her and her hus
band, and that, as his wife was dead,
he now could "do the right thing by
her." This, she said, he positively re
fused to do.
Mrs. Bradley was hysterical all day
yesterday. She made frequent inqui
ries as to the condition of her victim.
Her attorneys say she is on the very
verge of a collapse.
Many Offers of Help.
She was in conference with her law
yers for more than two hours yester
day and they directed that she see no
one except Senator Sutherland and her
physician.
According to the police a number of
prominent Western politicians have no
tified her they are willing to furnish
money for her defense. Several local
restaurants yesterday telephoned the
matron at the house of detention that
they would gladly serve Mrs. Bradley's
meals free of cost.
CONVERTED BUMS IN PULPIT.
A Fashionable Congregation Hears
Gospel From Lips of Former Toughs.
New York, Dec. 11.—The Collegiate
Church of St. Nicholas, the church ot
Helen Gould and Mrs. Russell Sage,
was filled with men and women of
wealth and social prestige last night
to listen to the story of the gospel
from the lips of converted Bowery
bums.
It came, curious and critical congre
gation, prepared to be shocked rather
than thrilled: it sat in silent wonder
through the most impressive religions
service ever held in the shadow of Mil
lionaire's Row at went home amazed
by the power of men's testimony to
hold spellbound this ultra-conservative
church of Fifth avenue.
There was nothing sensational un
less it was the deep iuvpvevui'iy, made
by the former outcasts of the BowerjY
and the way in which Dr. Mackay's
parishioners crowded about him at the
close of the services and asked that
the work go on.
SEVEN ARE BLOWN TO ATOMS.
Attempt to Open Box of Dynamite Re
sults Very Disastrously.
Charlotte, N. C., Dec. 11.—One white
man. five negroes and an Indian were
blown into fragments by the explosion
of dynamite in a tunnel on the right
of way of the New South & Western
lailroad. 1 he white man had been
ordered to open a box of dynamite for
blasting purposes and started to com
ply. One blow from a hammer explod
ed the contents and only a small frag
ment of the white man, who was blown
through the tunnel, has been found.
Six others were dismembered and sev
en were seriously injured. A mule
and car were thrown through the por
tal of the tunnel and down the moun
tain side. The car was wrecked, but
the mule escaped unscathed.
COL. SESSIONS INSANE.
Once Prominent Politician Uses Knife
and Is Taken to an Asylum.
Marshalltown, Dec. 11. Col. Fitz
roy Sessions, at one time prominent
in Iowa politics and the holder of
many government positions, but since
August of last year an inmate of the
Iowa soldiers' home here, went vio
lently insane last night and assaulted
Adam Liebernecht, a helpless Invalid
in the hospital, with a cane and knife,
cutting a gash in his thigh.
Col. Sessions was arrested and taken,
to the insane asylum.
MAY AGAIN FLOOD SALTON BASIN
Colorado River Breaks Loose—Many
May Lose Homes.
Yuma, Ariz., Dec. 11.—The entire
Colorado river has found a channel
around the Hind dam and Is flowing.,
back into Salton sink. Ltnless the
flood can be stopped very soon the
main line of the Southern Pacific will:
have to be rebuilt for 200 miles on
higher ground, and a thousand people!
in Salton basin will lase their hoihes
Not less than $25,000,000 depends on'
the effort to close the break.
Crawls With Broken Leg.
Heron Lake, Minn.y Dec. 11.—John
Schultz,. while returning home from
Okabena fell and broke a leg. He was.'1)
compelled to crawl nearly half a mile
for assistance. His hands were badly
frozen.
L«aps OVerboard to Death.
Seattle, Wash., Dec. 11.—B. T. Becfe
..with, a resident of New Ltindon Conn
committed suicide by jumping over
board from the steamer Northwestern
while the vessel was en route to Seat
tle. IV
£"^•'55
E
Bi
tloi
cril
gro
ing
Thi
COD
inti
gen
app
mlg
con
reel
fail
tho
by
A
stiti
spe
app
ed.
witl
stiti
sess
,. Sei
State
total
elect:
Craw
.a cle
plu
lJemc
a her
1904
on gc
votes
on til
order
Demr:
For
Philo
Willi
Willi
Sam
James
Henri
C. V.
R. J.
For
Coe I
John
Freen
Kmite
Liet
Howa
James
Martii
W. A,
'tfcw
W-WI
U-r r'11I
mI
V-Wf
as.".

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