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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, April 26, 1912, Image 7

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Strongly
boats.
Midway
ening
The War Fifty Years Ago
First Encounter of the Army of the Potomac With the
Defenders of the Peninsula—Battle of Lee's Mills,
Ipjlesr Yorktown—Gallantry of the Vermont Brigade.
By Captain GEORGE L. KILMER. Late
U. S. V.
ONcampaign
cure
Many Green Mountain Heroes—Fighting Begins at
New Orleans—-Captain D. D. Porter's Mortar Flotilla
Opens Fire Upon the Confederate Forts—Farragut's
Fleet Moves Up the River—Gallant Exploit Cutting
Away Chain Obstructions Under Fire.
April Hi, 1SG2. the tirst im
portant action of the Army ot
the
Yorktown
attempt
Potomac- in the peninsular
was fought on the
line. This was a spirited
b.v the Federal troops to se­
foothoul at tlie center of the
Confederate
posiiion covering the ap­
proaches) to
Yorktown.
The peninsula is bounded on the
north
b.v York river, which is com­
manded
by Yorktown and Uloucester.
on opposite
sides. Both places were
fortified to obstruct the en­
trance of
mounted
the river by federal gun­
The Confederate batteries
fifty six guns, many of whi.-li
were rilled
could
sion of the
(great
hat
the head
neers
that
hundred pounders and
bnve sun! the entire Meet. The
•Tames
river, which hounds the penin­
sula on tile
south, was in full posses­
Confederates. The line of
defense at
Yorktown was selected with
judgment. Taking advantage of
highest
ground on tlie peninsula at
place and projecting a line of iu-
trenchmenls
Southwest
and forts bearing a little
to a point c. nnnect ing with
of Warwick river, the engi
had continued the works down
stream to the .lames river.
Battle Near Lee's Mills.
Warwick
the.
river was a barrier between
Federals and the Confederate
works
which Ceneral J. It. Magruder
bad laid
out and nearly completed be
lore the
Federals arrived in force.
of this line Magruder had
placed a
dam and protected it by ritie
pits along
doubts
tbe task
nel R.
teries
the west bank and two re­
mounting three cannon.
On the
ed
15th (ieneral McClellan learn­
that the
Confederates were strength
these works and ordered the
commander
on this line to take action
'•nd prevent it. General W. F. Smith's
division
was nearest, and Smith gave
to the Vermont brigade. Colo­
B. Ay res stationed three bat­
of his artillery brigade in posi
Review of Reviews company.
•v
*taNEKATj R. B. AYEKS, U. S A., VHO WAS
CHIEF OF AKTJLLEliY AT LKE'S MILLS.
MOD to shell the Confederate works,
'iShile a battalion of the Third Ver
mont waded the river.
IColonel Hyde was directed to send
companies of the Third, to be sup
JPitrted by two more companies, across
rlassauit and drive the Confederates
®n the nearest rifle pits. If they
'succeeded in carrying these they were
announce the fact by cheers and"
iving a white handkerchief, wlwm
troops were to be sent to support
im and to attack the earthworks be
d. Colonel Hyde took for the at
ik Companies D, F, E and K. Com
iy D.
Vermonters to advance
le men pushed across the stream
food shape, though they were un
a sharp musketry fire from the
and though the bottom was in
nany places covered with a network
oit
felled trees, over which many trip
and fell, wetting both guns and
Ammunition. Floundering along In
•pite of all obstacles, however, the
companies reached the opposite
ik
handkerchief attached to his bayonet,
had fallen, mortally wounded, but the
men shouted lustily back across the
stream, handkerchiefs were waved by
several hands, and otlicers ^and men
looked with anxiety for the promised
supports. Their situation was a pre
carious one. The enemy was swiftly
rallying and with no lack of troops.
His first counter attack was made by
the Fifteenth North Carolina, which
ennte down on the double quick from
its camp over the crest and charged
the ritle pits 11 was met by tile men
Review of Reviews company.
joENFKAI, J. H. MAGRUDKIf, S. A.. M.'i
Tl.NOl lSllliLl IN TIIE DtOFBNSIf OF YOKK
TOWN.
of the Third Vermont with a fire by
which its commander. Colonel McKin
ney, was killed and some forty of his
men killed and wounded and retired
in extreme disorder.
Rally of the Confederates.
No supports followed the detachment
of the Third Vermont. Meanwhile the
Confederates gathered in heavy force.
By the exertions of General Howell
Cobb and Colonel Anderson the de
moralized regitnentfc were rallied and
others brought up. till no le=s than
seven regiments In-mined in the little
band of Vermonters. Captain Pingree
scut back two successive Messengers
to Colonel Hyde, asking either for re
enforcements or for permission to re
tire.
The rattle of musketry and roar of
artillery was too continuous at this
time to permit orders to be heard for
any distance, but those who did not
hear saw that a retreat was ordered,
and in live minutes the line had scat
tered back across the creek through a
shower of musket LialK Of the Ui
lirave men who crossed the stream
about 100 came back i.nharmed. bear
ing with them as many as they could
of their wounded comrades. They
had carried a line of rifle pits and had
held their position in front of two
Confederate brigades for forty mill
utes till they were ordered back
A general cannonade was then open
ed by the Federal batteries, and four
companies of the Fourth Vermont
dashed across to attack a one gun re
doubt near the stream, while four com
panics of the Sixth Vermont assaulted
I the Confederate rifle pits below Ihe
dam. Colonel Ayres' batteries tired
over the heads of the Vermonters and
1
then dashed into the stream with fix
ed bayonets I'.ut an outburst of Con
federate musketry and artillery fire
met Ihe assailants, and (Ieneral Smith
recalled the battalion of Ihe Fourth to
1
Captain Harrington, and F.
tain Pingree, formed in line near
river bank.
ish of the Vermont Battalion.
•bout 3 o'clock on the ICth the guna
Mott's. Wheeler's and Kennedy's
teries opened a vigorous cannonade
tbe crest of the slope. Magru
j"s artillery responded, but bis fire
jfb slackened under the storm of shot
shell, and tbe moment arrived for
and dashed straight for the rifle
i, driving out of them a force about
lal in number to their own. They
re soon joined by Companies E and
orporai Hutchinson of Company D,
bad been selected to signal the
cupancy of the works by waving a
save it from destruction. The men of
I the Sixth, however, waded the stream.
holding their muskets and cartridge
boxes above their head®. The excited
Confederates beyond tired over the
heads of this column, and only a few
rushed to the breastworks. It was
madness to try to hold on. and orders
came to retreat. In the advance about
forty men fell and an equal number
on the retreat.
Smith's division lost 104 killed and
wounded and Macruder's Confederate
command ninety-five in all. (Ieneral
Smith said in his report. "There were
more individual acts of heroism pcr
formed than 1 ever heard of in tbe
great battle."
Opening the Mississippi.
Farragut's naval expedition fitted out
during the winter of 18G2 to attack
New Orleans came as an afterthought
In Washington. The first plan adopted
for prosecuting the war on the water
was to blockade every important har
bor on the southern coast. But the
fleet of new Federal ironclads built on
the upper Mississippi in the fall of
1861 was looking for more sea toom.
which could only be had by seeking
it downstream. Now, if ships could
plow one way they could tbe other,
•nd in spite of the woeful unprepared
ness of those times the contract was
given out on the spur of the moment
to
open up the lower Mississippi and
cut
tbe Confederacy in two.
The outlook in the winter of 18G'J
•didn't worry the Confederates block
aded in the Crescent City. "Nothing
that walks can cross the swamps,"
was
on
the cheerful cry of the populace
the levees When Lincoln was ap­
pealed to by captain
v.
rcrtcr,
v.
S. \\. who had been on blockade duty
Captain i'orter created out of raw
materials almost the mortar fleet, a pe
culiar adjunct of the navy designed to
fight against land forts. The required
vessels were not yet owned by the gov
ernment when the expedition was plan
ned. They were to number twenty,
each carrying a thirteen inch mortar
and two thirty-two pounder cannon.
The southerners appreciated the I
"backbone" importance of the Missis
sippi for the purpose long before Pres
ident Lincoln coined the term. In
April, 18111. while the business of seiz
ing Federal forts on southern soil was
very brisk, they had hoisted the bon
ny blue fiag over two old citadels
standing on opposite sides of the riv
er below New Orleans. Fort Jackson,
the first above the mouth, was a star
shaped fortress, built of stone and
mounting seventy-four guns, heavy and
light. There were strong bomb proofs
and casemates and a citadel of heavy
masonry, which, in anticipation of some
raiding Farragut. they stored with am
munition and supplies for a long siege.
Fort Philip, across the river from Fort
Jackson, was built of slone and brick
and mounted fifty-two guns.
Confederate Defenses.
The best channel up the river from
the bar ran near the west bank under
the guns of Fort Jackson. This pas
sageway the Confederates blocked
with a row of old hulks, anchored and
bound together with chain cables.
Several tugs and steamers fitted out
for battle during the summer and fall
of ISfil patrolled the river above the
line of hulks, and farther upstream,
in actual waiting while Farragut was
scouring northern harbors for his
ships, lay the new ironclad Louisiana,
mounting twelve guns, and the pon
derons w'nalebacked iron ram Manas
sas. Several converted steamers, cot
ton clad, with heavy bales around
their engines and machinery, complet
ed the river defense fleet. Still an
other Ironclad, the Mississippi, was on
the ways and nearly finished.
Farragut reached the army rendez
vous in person Feb. 20. 1802. but not
until March 18 were the war steamers
assigned to him on Ihe scene.
The fleet which finally went Into ac
tion consisted of the first class screw
I sloops Hartford. Brooklyn. Itiehmond
and Pensaeola. the second class sloops
Oneida. Varuna and Iroquois, flit
screw gunboats Cayuga. Itasca. Ka
tahdin. Kennebec. Kineo. Pinola. Scio
ta. Winona and Wissahickon. the sail
iing sloop Portsmouth and the side
wheeler Mississippi
The Mortars Begin to Shoot.
On the lfith of April the lleet was
well into the channel, within tlire
miles of Fort Jackson. The mortar
boats went into hiding on both banks
of the river, curtained or disguised by
'the branches of trees. The range to
Fort Jackson was one mile and a half
and to Fort Philip two miles.
Porter's mortars opened lire upon the
Confederate forts guarding the chan
nel April IS. The third night of tlie
bombardment the Federal vessels Pi
nola and Itasca steamed up the river
1
to sever the lino of hulks and chains
stretched across the stream under the
guns of the fort. They were discov
ered by the enemy and fired upon.
1
The Pinola finally dropped astern, but
the Itasca, under Lieutenant (.:. H.
Caldwell, threw a grapnel aboard a
CAPTAIN D. D. rORTKK, V, S. N., COMMAND
Eli OF IHE OUT
A It KLOTILI.A AT NEW
OB LEANS.
Coni'edenitp schooner in the line, which
caught on the mil. The rail jinve way.
and the steamer, her engines moving
slowly. KnipplecJ on the next hulk. The
strong current soon en used hoth ves
sels to switiR around under the suns
•f the forts. The l'inola run to the as
sistance of her consort, and as soon as
his ship was free again I.ieutenant
Caldwell steamed on through the open
ing ho had made. Passing far enough
beyond the obstructions to give the
Itasca good headway, he turned down
stream with a full head on. struck the
chains holding the hulks together and
tore them asunder by the weight of
his ship.
COMING TO
1
in the gulf, to send ships and soldiers
to New Orleans he said: "This should
1
have been done before. The Missis-
1
6ippi is the backbone of the (.'onfed
eracy."
The plan put down on paper was to I
send at once a Federal fleet mounting
200 guns, a powerful mortar flotilla
and an army of lio.ooo soldiers to raze
the forts at the mouth of the Missis
sippi, capture New Orleans and fortify
the river bluffs as far up as Vicksburg.
At the same time the ironclad gunboats
hemmed in around St. I.ouis and Cairo
and never yet under lire would fight
their way down the river and unite
forces around Vicksburg.
SISSErON
Battle Creek Health Specialists
Noted Physicians of Rare Merit
and Extraordinary Experience
WILL BE AT THE COMMER­
CIAL HOTEL, TUESDAY,
APRIL 30th.
Honrs: 10 a. m. to 6 p. m.
ONE DAY ONLY
Free Consultation and Advice.
The Battle Creek Health Spe
cialists are several specialists wh
have combined in tilic special
treatment of chronic and nervous
diseases by new, revised and im
proved methods. Their perfec
ted system is today recognized as
the most successful according to
latest, scientific research work of
the medical vorld. The wonderful
success in their treatment of
those diseases has aroused much
enthusiasm in the northwestern
states in which they travel.
The many testimonials receiv
ed and many new cases recom
mended by former patients is due
to their scientific mode of treat
ment.
The following is a. partial lisl
of ailments treated: as troubles
of eye, ear, nose and throat., as
catarrh, deafness, stomach, in
testines, blood, skin, heart', lungs,
nerves,
as
asthma, consumption,
weakness, dizziness, kidney, blad
der, swellings, hedwetting, rheu
matism, and eases people call pri
vate troubles.
With their system of treat
ment. no operations for appendici
tis, gall stones, tumors and goi
tre.
All cases are kept strictly con
fidential
io matter what you may think
or others have told you regarding
your ailment consult' the doctors
on this trip as it' may be your
la.st. chance to see a specialist.
For all those who call on this
trip there'll be NO OllARtiK for
examination and consultation.
NOTICE:--Married ladies with
out their HUSBANDS, and min
ors without! Iheir parents. will
postively not be admitted to Con
sultation unless accompanied by
one of their local physicians.
DON'T FOUGHT THE DATE!
AND COME EAKLY.
They will return regularly
every few inont.li.s. (42-44)
Eggs for Settings.
K-hude Ishiml Red
Sett ing-OG for 50 rents or 100
for $3.00. Three Mn-eks west of
the water tower. 44p.
!. A. MeDoiiiild. SisseJoii, S. J).
NEW
Assets:
$10,839,000
THE
SEWING
A I N E
OF
QUALITY.
HOME
NOT
SOLD
N E
ANY
OTHER
NAME.
WARRANTED FOR ALL TIME.
If you pnrchuH' thr NKW JIOM1S you will
b«vo life assi-t JU the price you p.»v, md will
not Lave sill entile** chain of repairs.
Quality
35 Na»un Si. New Ycrk
Strong Postal Points
FirM
HOW
EASY
SoiicbV
"Dak
Bran per
Shorts per ti.
Considered
it is the
Cheapest
in the end
lo buy.
]f yon want a v. winjz machine, write for
out* lateM catalogue before yon pun I
UM-.
Ihe New Home Sewing Machine Co., Orange, Mass..
tc&cL dsfe J*
Postal Life Building
Annual
I I
{Ml'-
rrscrxv itintirniu m-l
fr«t?rr*t
Dividend of
or ni-M'tbtnriit
SMMD MFTI.FLFIRD POL
icy rhvrv(* miw iiio)
titan tlO.WU. (KM).
Tliifl: Sfdmfard vol
ley (irfiriMdri b, ni
proved l? ttir Slate IIIFUI
atict- l)cfai luit'iii.
luurlti.
llnih Tiuthcr:
Stamliirtl#
besides—ranging
Piftli- vfrtjmarri
No iipre-r will be sen-
•/.
0PPQRTUNITIES {N
CLUB^T"
Shown by
has
tlse
issi
on- Dividend,
policyholder on entrance into the
panies would
pay
the Great .^XhavE
[Business NensClubJ
for the first year: in subsequent years
POSTAL policyholders also receive the Renewal Coin
other companies pay their agents, namely,
71/. '•. Policyholders likewise receive .an Office-]
Ext-nnsc Saving of 2%. making up the
up to
MO
NO AXES
C'PucS— MfMPHIS ^^00^
TO SELL
T0
GR
INO
Thi. is a citizen*' movement, to furnish in
formation by the distribution of selected publica
tions like the Magazine, "The South Today" and
other reliable literature, to induce the home
seeker to come to the Memphis district, where
for from
$15 TO $75 AN ACRE
one can purchase land of deep alluvial richness,
on which can be grown from two to Ave crops a
year.
This is the land of health, good roads, good
schools, and out of door work the year round,
where Cotton is worth $75 per acre. Com $60,
Hay $100, Potatoes $200, Strawberries $500,
etc. We have the best produce markets in the
world.
The low priced rich lands in the Memphis
district will advance rapidly. No such values
exist in any other portion of the country. Send
for "The South Today" and other literature froe.
Send right now.
Industrial Commissioner,
Business Men's Club, Memphis, Tenn.
Ihe Standard for News.
nsurancc in force
more than $55,000,000
The Postal Life Insurance Company
pays
you
Commissions that
other Companies pay their
A KQh
t,f tllc firsl ear
hi
agents.
premium is the average
Com-
guaranteed to each POSTAL
Company.
this sum to
sion.
That's
Other
com­
an agent—as his commis­
Guaranteed
in the Policy
2
AJJLI the FOSTAL
P.'.v?
the
vpvciI
Such is the FOSTAL way: it is open to
at the Company's ofiicrp or
exact mm it will pf.y
in leriii..1
and
of
rat:
bnl rt(1utrl (••.mo-Mi n
livichnK sn
tht
»ii
«s
sl&Ud
herein
contingent dividends
0
oi'
W W S
you
premium.
at
every other.
33 r.'-jtjia St., K-. -.v 'i orlc
REQUEST FOR :KFOn.MAT!OM
Postal Life Insurance Company:
TMcaBe mail insurance purticulaje for my
My exact date of birth
Occupation
Xajne
0
Adilrcss
1
Ukes-AWUC.
ggpnty were
uroiled this
of pupils enroill
1G. Average
.ee 10.
•no have been neither
'.tardy this year are
/*-tha Welk.
have been held
v.
:r,,
-o
y-»", iit
'il program
din-
•S
FOR
We Sell Hard and oa
you- Call
write
and find out the
your
rge—the
POSTAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
Tile Qnlii Ci'nijmn-ij in America
first year
ICO up
Tuck was be-
«.-« slide ijito the hole
up to that ti.ine .Mads liaVl
occupied alone. When lie saw
what- wa.s happening |H, ,de a
desperate effort to get out of tins
hole, and was pretty well toward
the surl'a.ce wlie.ti li rock struck
his le^s, imprisoning h.iiin as in a
vise. JIads vellled luhlily for help,
which shortly arrived in the form
of the luire'd man, but as the im
prisoning rock was too heavy for
mortal niit.ni to* lift, the hired tiLaa
started off iji sefu'ch of other
means of releasing the prisoner,
lie went over aind got Otto Olsoo
and while the two men were on
their way to the Raan farm tliey
met up with Ernest Nyberg and
'•p c5bn Loken, traveling in an auto
•_ & Vic. They enlisted the ser—
these gentlemen and
iUU',
by the adroit
use of the auto
they soon
had
far
eQ°u?t
s0 t,,at
0 *1
,liB
%*r
?,? V- 6
na—
1 O

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