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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, May 24, 1912, Image 7

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1912-05-24/ed-1/seq-7/

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By Captain GEORGE L. KILMER. Lite
U. S. V.
HIS time fifty years ago the
He kept near enough to his foe to lie
ready to strike quickly i!' he saw that. I
he had the advantage. MeClellan's
line of advance was between two riv
ers. the I'aninnkcy on the northwest.
and the James on the southeast. The
PnmunUey is navigable to within
twenty miles of Richmond and (ho
James the whole distance.
McC'lellan established his base of
supplies on the I'amunltey. This gave
water communication with Fortress
War Fifty Years Ago
The Federal Army of the Potomac Approac':ng Rich
mond -Plan to Advance Along the James River.
Confederates Obstruct the Channel and Mount Big
Guns Gallant Attack of Federal Ironclads Gen
eral B. F. Butler Becomes Military Governor of the
Captured City of New Orleans—His Famous Order
Aimed Against Women—Hangs a Prominent Citizen
For Hauling Down the United States Flag.
Federal Army of the Potomac.
mnler General George B. Me
Clellan. was marching through
Bloughs of sticky Virginia mud toward
Richmond. The Confederate army,
which had abandoned its fortifications
ut Yorktown tin May 4, was retiring
toward Richmond. Its commander.
Genera! Joseph K. Johnston, believed
yiat Richmond could best lie defended
from MeClellan's attacks by an army
In the open. His backward marili
was over the same roads which the
Federals followed.
Copyright by the Patriot Publishing company.
Monroe and Washington via York riv
er, the Chesapeake and the Potomac.
A railroad ran in the center of the
peninsula from West Point at the
ship no.i ,i saugliter house. Out of
twenty (•.•Lin -hots which struck the
ship eighteen penetrated the armor
Her lo-s was thirteen killed and eleven
wounded. Confederate sharpshooters
lined both hanks of the river and pick
ed oil the men from the Galena with
ease. The Galena attempted to dis
lodge these death dealing marksmen
by raking the hanks with shell and
small shot Bui they held their ground
until the ironclads dropped down the
river out of range. •,
In the middle of May. one Fed
ora I army was operating before Cor
inth. another was advancing through
northern Alabama toward Chattanoo
ga. and a third was striving to bring
th:' territory of the lower Mississippi
tinder control.
On Ihe 2'Jth of April the Federal
army •commanded by General II. W.
Hailed began the siege of Corinth.
Miss. The place was held by the Con
federate army which General Beaure
gard had marched back from the bat
tlefield of Shiloh. General Halieok de
termined to make a vigorous campaign
for a foothold in northern Mississippi
1
mouth of the Pamunkey to Richmond,
The track was repaired as the army
advanced, and engines and cars were
brought from Washington to equip it. I
Ironclads Attack Richmond Defenses
The James river was closed to Fed
eral ships at I'rewry's Bluff, fifteen
miles below Richmond. McClelian
favorite plan was to advance along the
James river, and Johnslou believed
that he would do this. In fact, he
thought that the Federals would cross
the James river to ihe south bank, as
they did in 1804. He planned to at
tack them while crossing if not before,
To meet an expected attack at Drew
ry'e Bluff the Confederates mounted
five big guns on the hills and sunk I
several ships in the river channel to
obstruct the Federal navy. Captain
Josiah Tatnall and the crew of the old
ram Merrimac handled the batteries. I
On May 15 the Federal ironclad Moni
tor and the ironclad Galena, supported
by three wooden gunboats, sailed up
and attacked the Confederate defenses. I
The Galena was a small corvette
plated with three inch iron. She car
rled six guns. The Monitor carried
two guns. The Galena ran to within
600 yards of Tatnall's guns, the Moni- I
tor going a little nearer. The Moni
tor's fire was too low, and she soon I
dropped out of the fight unharmed,
The shots of the ironclads dismounted
two of Tatnall's guns and killed sev
eral of his men. But the Confederates'
Are was still more effectual on the
ironclads. The Monitor was struck
squarely on he? turret by an eight
Inch shell and hit twice on her side
armor.
Slaughter on Board the Galena.
I It was a hopeless battle from the
•tart for the ironclads. Commander
John Rodgers of the Galena determin
ed to test his ship and remained under
8rt four hours. One ten inch shell
broke through and shattered the hull.
The Confederates concentrated their
fire upon the Galena and converted tb.e
DECK OF THE NEW IRONCLAD GALENA AFTER THE ATTACK ON DREWRY'S BLUFF.
maintained. He requested that out
rages committed by l-edcral soldiers
should be promptly reported. It soon
became known that a large portion of
the population was literally starving.
An attempt was made to hurry for
ward provisions from Mobile and other
lities. but there was still a shortage.
However, there was a large nmount
of beef and sugar stored in the city
which had been gathered for the Con
federate troops in the field. Butler
on the Oth of May had ordered 1.000
barrels of these commodities to be dis
tributed among the poor women and
children of the city even though their
husbands and fathers were in the army
fighting against the United States. The
business men of the city co-operated
with the Federals to establish order,
although they had little faith in But
ler's ability to subdue the turbulent
element which remained.
A notable exception to this spirit of
submission was the conduct of a por
tion of the female population who
availed themselves of the privilege of
their sex to offer insults in various
ways to Federal soldiers. Butler deter
mined to make an example of this, and
on May lath promulgated general or
der No. 2S and sent his name ringing
throughout the civilized world. It read.
"As oflicers and soldiers of the United
States have been subject to repeated
insults from women, calling themselves
ladies, of New Orleans, in return for
the most scrupulous noninterference
and courtesies on our part, it is ordered
hereafter when any female shall by
mere gesture or movement insult or
show contempt for any oflicers or sol
diers of the United States she shall
be regarded and held liable to be treat
ed as a woman about town plying her
vocation."
Butler Proclaimed an Outlaw.
The mayor of the city wrote to Gen
eral Butler a vigorous protest against
Kast of him part of the troops. General this order, and Ruiler imprisoned him
Knell's army of the Ohio. had crossed jn Fort Jackson until he apologized in
(he lines from Tennessee into northern writing. This apology, together with
Alabama. On the 2!th General Mitchell
the rilizens opposing it. lliis cut
Butler came in contact with unruly
elements in New Orleans soon after
a
occupied Bridgeport after driving the the meaning and intent of the order,
Confederates out.
General Ben Butler In New Orleans.
On (he lifllh also the stars and stripes
were hoisted over the custom house at
New Orleans by the drlachment oi sail
ors whom Farragut had sent on this
errand with a couple of his staff o!!i
.••ers. The Confederate troops had
evacuated New Orleans. The mayor"!
:ho cilv had refused to surrender the
place. There was considerable parley
ing over the civil surrender, nearly a!!
oines lor
•It..FT \'«iv 1 V\T* I't 11 T'ri i* 1 f" rioii. ... ...... A
shurt on May 1 by the arrival of Gen
eral B. F. Butler with a body of Fed
era I soldiers, lie inaugurated a vig
ous military rule.
he took control as military governor, j]| take eyre of themselves."
The Confederate soldiers had left the The furor crejited by the publica
city, but among the citizens there were
manv troublesome ones who seixed
apon very incident which smacked of
oppression to show (heir hostility. The
first United States flag hoisted in New ting northern enemies. The most
Orleans was raised over the United conservative in the north criticised it
States mint. This was done as soon a
Butler's War on Women.
n(
Poor Judgment io Change
litor Xisselon Standard
W irh your ivenni.ssioii. 1 would
I lik' in say a word to the voters
I of Huberts county.
I Kvmo- to tlie fact, t.liat tile vi
tot's ol KolietMs county will sootl
be called oil to vote for officers
for the liationnal. state and eonn
ty. and ill the begmniitjr. let me
s:i.v that, under the present, lneth
o'd of nominaljn^r candidates for
ol fire, t.11• voters are. and sltotiK
be. Iiel'd responsible for the holi
est and character of the persons
nomuated. Wherefore, it is of the
greatest importance that t.lie vo
ters think, and think well, be
fore they make an before the
11m jiie of a eaindida.lt-. All honest,
thoughtful man will, and others
should.
The 'destiny of our country is
now in the hands of the whole
people, .so far
JIS
it
explanation by General Butler of
was published in the daily papers of
May 10. The-explanation read as fol
lows: "There can be, there has been no
misunderstanding of general order No.
2S No lady will take any notice of a
strange gentleman in such form as to
attract attention. Common women do.
"Therefore, whatever woman, lady
or mistress, gentle or simple, who by
gesture, look or word insults, shows
contempt for. thus attracting to her
self the notice of my oflicers and sol
diers. will lie deemed to act as tie
It
if
\*f
!&
vocation as common wo-
man and will lie liable to be treated ac
cordingly. I shall not as I have not
abated a single word of that order It
was well considered: if obeyed, will
protect the true and modest woman
from all possible insult. The others
tioll of 0|
.,
ler ._s vas not CO
ti
le
as Farragut's ships appeared in the denounced it in unscathing terms,
harbor on April 'JO. It was promptly President Lincoln tolerated the or
hauied down by a man named Mum- 3er. Some weeks later Butler himself
ford, a respectable citizen. The city jn a private letter said that unless the
bad not been formally surrendered, rampant element was held down there
jmd the citizens believed that the Hag would have been riots and it would
raising was premature. Farragut re- have been necessary to clear the
ported the hauling down of the flag to streets with artillery. He could not
General Bntler. who promptly replied.
1
it
it
iinnt-d to
New Orleans nor the southern states
It was read to the Confederate soldiers
to incite them to renewed ardor in re-
radical opponents of (he war
arrest the women, so he issued an or-
"I will make an example of this fellow I der which executed itself. In Ihe
by hanging him." Farragut smiled same spirit shortly afterward Butler
and said. "You will have to catch him hanged Mumford for hauling down the
before you can hang him." Butler United States flag. Calls for Butler's
said. "1 know that, but I will catcl1
him and then hang him.'' Mumford
was caught.
assassination appeared in southern pa
pers, and President Davis proclaimed
him an outlaw. European statesmen
were slow to believe that the Federal
government would sanction order No.
Butler's first act of discipline in the 28. It was bitterly denounced in (he
captured city was the proclamation of British parliament. Prime Minister
martial law. Well disposed persons Lord Russell declared that it was in
were assured that they and their prop- defensible as an act of war and calcu
erty would be preserved and the laws lated to incite the soldier to violence.
A
iv?
1
the selection of
public servants is concerned, and
tih• comitiix primary election is
going t.o prove whether or not
tile people. the common peo
ple, are canaille of self- govern
ment if not. the country ami the
people are going to get stung, bv
reason of the lack of honesty,
and intelligence. If the dishon
est vulpine class were the only
ones to suffer by the ads oil' the
above mentioned class, it would
be well but sttcill in not 1 he ease
all must suffer for the mistakes
and political crimes oif others.
Polities art' becoming as rot
ten in this country as they were
in Ancient Home, and it docs not
require the wis'dom of Solomon 1
foresee that the history of Home
is being repeated in this, our
much-loved country.
In conclusion, wish to say
that we have one man, our pub
lic servaant iji congress, who is
serving our stale and its people
well. lie is capable, holiest and
alert to the best intoresst o,f the
country, not only our state, but
the whole country, lie i,s a man
of the people and for the people.
That man's name is Charles II.
Burke. Moreover, Charles II.
Burke was instrumental in seeu.r
in."' free liotnes for every moth
er's son of us claim-holders on
the Sisseton.and.Wa.hipeton Hoser
vation. This I know to lie an ab
solute fact, bectiu.se
1
waN behin'd
the free homes.project from vtat'•1
to finish, and I know that with
out Burke's dauntless courage,
many of us woul'd be without a
home today. .Mr. Curtiss may be
a. da pa hi an'd good man. but be
would not be able to fill Burke's
•seat in congress t.o the satisfac
tion of 1he peojp.lo of t.llis dis
trict. for many years to come.
"Wherefore, it would be the very
heighih of poor .iu'dgment to ex
change Burke, who has been triei
and found true, for an exipcri
meiit.
This is written without Ihe
Bran per ton
ton
knowledge, consent or suggestion
o! Burke or any other person ex
cept myself.
Verv Respect full v.
'. B. IA KXOX
Kntoriiri.se Township Mav
1!UL\
l:
Warrant Call.
All warivant.s issue by Bossko
civil township, up to and includ
ing Registered No. 244. are here
by called for payment..an'd inter
est reason on this date. Payable
at the Citizens National Bank at
Sisveton. S. I).
Date*! ^lay 1.
—La.sse Markeseth.
4S Treasurer.
Warrant Call.
All wararnt.s of Easter lowii
sliip, up to and including No. 375
are hereby called for payment.
Interest, ceases on this date. Pay
able at the Citizens National Bank
Sissoton, S. D.
Dated, May 1,3912.
—Casper Mellenlioff,
47 Treasurer.
Address: Route 1, Peever, S.
Warrant Call
All warrants up t.o and incltwl
ing Register No. 2125 of th.e City
of Sittseton, S. D., aa-e called for
payment. Interest, ceases on the
date of this notice.
Date'd this 20th dav of Mav
1912.
E.C. OA MM.
Oiltv Treasurer.
First class board by day or
week. People's Hotel. (47-50
William Giasicr, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon
OFFICE OYER REXALL DRUG STORE
Office No. 146
Phone:
DRAY & TEAM WORK
Phone KG- 91.
S I S S E O N S
ECK3S
DRAY km TRANSFER LINE
MO KS A
General Dray and Transfer
Business.
Kui »i ihi rfMiml Piano lUovin a SpcrhUty
'•jiniens I'loweil and Harrowed,
EEN ECK, Prop.
Solicits your flour trade
We Sell Hart and
Dakota Pride"
$1.40
HOWARD KAIiCOCK
Attorney-at-Law
Uill.'O ovor b'irst National Hank
SISSKTON, 8. P.
frank R. MetUima,
Roberts C«.
TW L. fullar
Grant'Ca.
McKENNA Jt FULLER
Aito.'no.vs ami Counselors at Law
SISSKTON AND M1LHAXK. SO. DAK.
HOW IS YOUR TITLE?
Hotter See
L. WM. FOSS
About It.
Ofticc opposite Court House
SiHMdon, South Dakota
I'hone Number
.! .1 HATTERTON
Attorney-at-Law
Prarlice in All Courts
OIHce in Uoberts County Courthouse
SISAKTON. S. IX
Th Minneapolis Dollar-Hotel
200 MODERN ROOMS
Located in Heart of Buiineu DUtrict
$1.™ SINGLE RATE $1.°£
CUROPLAN RATE Fon TWO PERSONS $1.SO
PRIVATE BATH AND TOILET EXTRA
COMPLETE SAFETY
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER8
AND FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION
(INSURANCE RECORDS SHOW NO LIVES
EVER LOST IN A SPRINKLED BUILDING.)
EVERY ROOM HAS HOT AND COLO RUNNING
WATER. STEAM HEAT, GAS AND ELECTRIC
LIGHTS. AND TELEPHONE SERVICE.
SEVEN STORY ANNEX IN CONNECTION.
NEW
THE
8EWINO
MACHINE
OP
QUALITY.
HOME
NOT
SOLD
N E
Residence No. 205
Calls Answered Night or Day.
Leave All Orders at Mattfaner's
MURRAY BROS.
ANY
OTHER
NAME.
WARRANTED FOR ALL TIME.
If you purchase the NEW HOME you wl&
bavu a life ussel. at the price you pay, and Will
cut have an cndlcHH chain of repairs.
& Light Go.
per sack
Quality
Considered
it is the
Cheapest
in the end
to buy. ti
If you war.tunuwing machine, write for
our lati'ut catalogue before you purchase.
The New Home Sewing Machine Co., Orange, Mass.
The Standard for News.
$23.00
$24.00
oa
Oil

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