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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, July 05, 1912, Image 8

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1912-07-05/ed-1/seq-8/

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IN SOUTIHIAKOTA
Happenings of the Week From
All Over the State.
PROVIDES MORE REVENUE
Over One Million and a Half Acres of
Land Will Be Taxed for the
Firtt Time This Year.
Over a million and
in
a
half ar.ros of
tend will ba taxed for the flret time
this state this y^ar aiwl will in
crease tho real natal assessment of
the state several million dollars. The
new lamia como from linal proofs and
are, of course, principally in the ter
ritory west of the Missouri river, with
scattering tracts 011 the east. The
land offices in the stale show In their
reports to the stHto auditor the fol
lowing final proofs for the year:
Pierre 1,151
Timber Lake :i62
Lemmon H,00!)
Rapid City 2,908
Chamberlain 8f7
Gregory 1,4:11
Total .9,701
ONE THOUSAND WORK HARD
Build Twenty-four Miles of Good Road
In as Many Hour*.
When 1,000 residents of Codington
county South Dakota, grasped the
•hovel, pick, plow, scraper and grader
last week and leveled a good road
twenty-four miles in length In two
daye they started a movement that. In
the opinion of Waiertowu enthusiasts
•nd the state engineer, S. H.
IJOR
of
Pierre, will spread all over the state
and into North Dakota and Minnesota
"Twenty-four miles of good road in
twenty-four hours" was tho slogan
adopted by the public-spirited men
who discarded office clothes and
donned overalls for two days of hard
manual labor. The big undertaking
and its accompany success resulted
from several months of preparing.
W. H. Stokes, president of the Wa
tertown Automobile club, chairman of
the
good roads committee and head of
the
Stokes Mllllnb company, originat
ed the idea of building Codington
county's section of the Great Meri
dian highway from Galveston, Tex., to
Winnipeg in two days. The Idea first
came to him last winter, and from that
time on he worked constantly, figuring
out the most plausible scheme for suc
cess.
The Meridian highway, when com
pleted, will be a road stretching from
the southern border to the northern
border of the United States. It Is
planned to make this highway passa
ble for all kinds of vehicles, a means
of promoting closer communication be
tween residents all along the line. Mr.
Stokes said he thought there was' no
question that the road would be of
freat commercial value to the states
through which It passes, especially the
younger states of the Northwest.
Indicative of the Interest Water
town ehowed In the plan was the man
Mr In which citizens enlisted to assist
In working It out. Officers in every
bank, in some cases the presidents
and cashiers, took part. Every man
vu on a level with his fellow work
er. The rioh man and the poor man
worked aide by side and ate their
meals at the same rough board table.
The man who ordinarily conducts big
commercial aflalrs and the man who
guides the plow through South Dako
ta's sot! forgot their respective busi
ness and worked with a common In
terest.
TO GIVE IRRIGATION A TEST
Many Tract® Along the Missouri Will
Be Placed Under Water.
Among the permits to use water for
irrigation, which have been granted
by the state engineer's department
recently, are to James Benthlne of
Leslie to take water from the Chey
•nne river for the irrigation of 153
Mres to John Kleven of Capa to take
water from the Bad river for the Irri
gation of twenty-two acres to Zoake
brothers of Draper to take water from
Whit* river for the irrigation of 421
acres.
Irrigation is to get a general "try
out" In that part of the state this
year and It will be carried past the
•xperlmental stage along the Missouri
before the beginning of another Bea
ton. The McPherson Irrigation gar
den at Fort Pierre, which proved such
a success last year, is again being
worked "under water." The Philip
nnch seven miles Wp the river from
Fort Pierre, la handling several hun
dred acres with its big pumping out
fit
The Suburban acreage tract is han
dling 200 acres, while adjoining It on
the east the work of the government
•n the Indian Bchool farm Is being
pushed. Farther down the river the
Purington tract will be partly ready
„t for water this year. Up river an «x
-tensive tract on the term of T.
Rlggs ls biilng irrigated, with smaller
^plants about Fielder, and at old Fair
to northwestern Sully county,
Hvik*
Spencer ranch is handling a small
this y«ur and being put la
tor flooding MT«MI huadrtd
ADOPTS MINORITY REPORT
Convention Reverses Credentials in
South Dakota Case. I
The Democratic national convention
at Halt.itnorc was thrown into ureal I
disorder ipy conflicting demonstrations'
liy the supporters of Wilson, Clark
and Underwood. The outburst start
ed during the speech of Theodore ItelI
of California, who closed the debate
for the majority report, of the cre
dentials committee concerning t.lie
seating of the .South Dakota delega
tion which had been contested.
When Hell had
CXMICItided
the call
of the roll was begun on a question of
substituting the minority, or Wilson
report, for the majority,, or Clark re
port. The vote resulted:
Ayes (for Wilson), t!33Vi nays (for
Clark), 4:17. Not voting, IT). Absent,
2. Philippines ti votes excluded. The
South Dakota delegation was not
called, being involved in tho oonlast.
Aberdeen Business Men Act.
At a meeting of the Aberdeen Coin
menial club steps were taken to build
the eleven miles of tho state highway
between Aberdeen and the Itrown
county Hue. Hesolutions were adopt
ed culling for $5,000 for the purpose
and committees were appointed to
raise the money and co-operate with
the boards through the townships
(rliere the road passes. Tho highway,
which lias been named the I'armley
road after J. W. Parmley of Inswich.
one of the original advocates of good
roads in South Dakota, will run from
Aberdeen to Mobridge, on the Mis
soiiri river, and will eventually extend
eastward to the Minnesota line and
westward to the Montana line.
Sues Railroad For 10 Cents.
Tmll J. Woerth, late candidate for
nomination to congress In the First
district, who lives at Kimball, has
started suit against the Chicago, Mil
waukee and St. Paul Railroad compa
ny for Ihe sum of 10 cents Mr.
Woortli traveled 011 the road without
first having procured a ticket and the
conductor charged him 10 cents in ex
cess of the regular fare. When Woerth
tried at Oacoma to get a refund by
turning In tho slip the agent declined
to recognize it as having any money
value. This and the attitude of the
agent, angered Woerth, hence he has
started the suit and declares he will
push It to the end.
Land Deal in Hills Country.
One
at
of the biggest land deals made
Rapid City in severa,! years has
boon closed by the Merchants Loan
and Trust coin puny, which sold to
Dominic Krler, rancher in the east­
ern
part of the state, 700 acres lying
near
Box Klder creelt. nine miles
north of Rapid City. The purchase
price was $19,000. While the land
was
purchased for speculative pur
poses Mr. Krier intends to cultivate
a
large
portion of it at once.
Expert Studies Cutworms.
Superintendent Webster of the in
sect bureau of the agricultural depart
ment has been visiting points in
South Dakota to Investigate tho work
of cutworms and other pests. It is
believed as the result of his visit ob
servation stations will be established
In different parts of the state, with
experts in charge, whose duties it will
be to make a study of the Injury to
crops by insects and the best means
to annihilate the pests.
TO BUILD NO MORE LINES
Soo Line President Serves Notice on
Wisconsin.
St. Paul, .1 uly 1.—President Edmund
Pennington of the Soo Line, whose
company operates extensive milegae
in Wisconsin, in the strongest state
ment that has yet emanated from any
railroad president in the Northwest
regarding conditions in the common
wealth that lies east of Minnesota,
said that his company would not build
another mile of road in Wisconsin
now, or at any future time, so far as
could be foreseen.
Existing conditions in Wisconsin
are such, he said," as to discourage
capital seeking investment and he de
clared that as the result of a state of
public mind due to the agitations of
Wisoonsln politicians that state is not
progressing as are other Western
states, but Is going backward.
TWENTY-TWO AWAIT DEATH
Record Number of Murderers in Sing
Sing Prison.
New York, July 1.—Three murder
ers will be executed in tbe death
house in Sing Sing on July 8. They
are Guiseppe Ciprellt, who was sen
tenced to death Feb. 28, 1911 George
Williams, a negro, who was received
at Sing Sing Nov. 21 of last year, and
Zanaza Santa, who was sentenced last
December in connection with the mur
der of Mrs. Harry Haill at Croton
Lake, for which murder four others
were sentenced at the same time.
There are twenty-two murderers in
the death house in Sing Sing Just now,
the largest number of condemned men
ever kept at that institution at any
one time.
MOTORCYCLE RACERS KILLED
Two Dead and Two Injured in Race
at San Jose, Cal.
San Jose, Cal., July 1.—Two motor
cycle racers were killed and two oth
ers seriously injured while riding fast
er than a mile a minute at races at
the San Jose driving park.
The dead are: Reed Orr, Sacra
mento Motorcycle club W. W. Baker,
8an JOM Motorcycle dob.
CYCLONE RAZES
CANADIAN TOWN
Meager Details ol Terrific Storm
at Regina, Sask.
Winnipeg, July 1.—A terrific cyclone
swept over Regina, Sask., leaving
Its path many dead, hundreds of
maimed bodies and 'i loss that will
run far into the millions.
A message from ,1. R. Sutherland,
superintendent of the government
telephones, said that thirty girls were
at work in the main Itegina exchange,
which was demolished that three
were? killed instantly, that seven died
after being taken from the ruins and
that several are in a hospital in criti
cal condition.
Further than this no information
has come about fatalities, save the
general statement that there were
many of them. It will be impossible
to estimate with any accuracy for sev
eral hours Ihe number who perished
or are imprisoned in damaged build
ings. Kar' reports said there were
perhaps 200 dead.
Physicians have been hurried to the
scene from here. They are accom
panied by nurses. Regina hospitals
are filled with patients and temporary
places for treatment of the wounded
ure being located. Kvery vehicle in
the city, it was said, was put into use
RS ambulances.
The cyclone followed a day of thun
der storms and high winds. Notwith
standing many people were in the
streets, walking, or riding in automo
biles or carriages. The city was gor
geously decorated for the celebration
of Dominion day. Bunting and Hags
covered buildings everywhere and a
network of electric lights was strung
ready for a grand illumination.
RESOLUTION CAUSES
TERRIFIC UPROAR
Text of Bryan Document Modi
fied in Convention.
Raltimore, .June 2K.—This is the
resolution which Mr. Bryan unexpect
edly introduced in the Democratic na
tional convention, creating a storm
which exceeded in volume and acrim
ony any storm at the recent Repub
lican convention in Chicago.
The startling thing about it was
that two of the men of "big business,"
which the resolution named as seek
ing to make the Democratic nominee
for the presidency their "bond slave,"
sat in the convention as delegates
Thomas K. Ryan and August Belmont.
In his speech on the resolution Mr.
Bryan did not hesitate to speak plain
ly his thoughts about these men.
"Resolved, That in this crisis of
our party's eareer and in our country's
history, this convention sends greet
ing to the people of the United States
and assures them that the party of
Jefferson and Jackson is still the
champion of popular government and
equality before the law. As proof of
our fidelity to the people, we hereby
declare ourselves opposed to the nomi
nation of any candidate for president
who is the representative of, or under
any obligation to, J. Pierpont Morgan,
Thomas l-\ Ryan, August Belmont or
any other member of the privilege
hunting and favor seeking class be
It
further
"Resolved, That we demand the
withdrawal from this convention of
any delegate or delegates constitut
ing or representing the above named
interests."
After considerable acrimonious de
bate Mr. Bryan consented to an
amendment striking out the last sec
tion of the resolution. It was then
adopted by a vote of more
thirds
of
than two-
the convention.
even as YEARS
EXPERIENCE
PATENTS
TRADE MARKS
DESIGNS
COPYRIGHTS AC.
Anyone a sketch nni description may
quickly ascertain our opintou whether au
Invention is probably patentable. Conitiiunloa
ttong strictly confidential. HAN0B00K on Patent*
•ent free. Oldest aaency for securing patenr*.
Patent* taken through Muuu & Co. receive
tpceial notice* without charge, in tbe
Scientific American.
handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest ctr*
jilatlon of any scientific Journal. Terms, $3 a
"ear: four months, $L 8old by all newsdealers.
Th Minneapolis Dollar-Hotel
200 MODERN ROOMS JL
200 MODERN ROOMS
Located is Hurt of Buiiaca. DMrict
$1.22 SINGLE RATE $1.2°
(UftOPLAN «»TT ron TWO PC.ONO SI.50
I —M-lf ii Hn.it ni Biuinf ItUtrirt
PRIVATE BATH AND TOILET EXTRA
COMPLETE SAFETY
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS
AND FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION
(INSURANCC necoaoa SHOW MO uvea
even LOST IN A SPRINKLED SULLOINQ.)
CVCFTR ROOM HAS HOT AND COLO RUNNING
WATER. STEAM HEAT. OAS ANQ ELECTRIC
LTQMTS, ANO TELEPHONE SERVICE.
SEVEN STORT ANNEX IN CONNECTION.
THROW OUT THE LINE.
Give Them Help and Many Sisse-
:cn People Will Be Happier.
"'i'Uiv.v
:I'.
t:u
L::e L'iU'
I
Tli: idii-ys lh\ ii'iip.
Til:-, re i\'-re. ori u—'iii't g'it
Uiu is. »n t'iii-Ti.'d i: of! tlie
bio'Jii.
Th'.'v gottixg worse
Will
you h.'lp
l)-aa'd KMuev L'lLLs hxv"
brought thousands kidney sur!
t'erer.s back I'foai ti'.e v?:•!£•* u: de
spair.
S tn •stirn-Kiy proves til-sir
worth.
MK Thomas Mac D'»n:.U. S':
s-iton S Dak., says: "'I waa sub
ji'L-t to symptoms or kMney com
plaint ,for a long
time
ii.n.s
Ri'iiiciii'iei- tti•
and will
say that Doaa's Kidrwy Pills
lirought me greater relief than
any other kidney medicine. This
prepar if.irn drove away the agon
izing
in tny back and also
:tengthened my kidneys. I used
in all the contents of six boxes of
Doan'.s Kidney I'jlis, procured at
the Palace Drug Store and theiv
mad"
a»e feel
like a different
woman."
For sale by all dealers. Price
50 (tents. Foster-Milburn Co
Buffalo, N- York, sole agents
for to. I'jiited States.
r-Mt'i—Doaa's—
and take no other.
(6)
Notice for Publication.
Department of the Interior,
I S. Land Ortiee at Timber Lake. S. i).
.June 27. ISM'i
N'otice is hereby giv«*ti that, Johan I\ .!.
ViniM\ of Sisspt.on. S. I).. Route No. iy who
cm June no. 191 mad»» H')tneteaU Kntry. No
2i54til.\ Serial No. OiTti. for SK'4 of N\V|^,
section township N. range ~1 W. .Yth
1'rineinal Merulian. Sisaeton and Wahpnlun
Indian Reservation, ti-is tiimi notice of inden
tion to make final live year proof. fc- establish
'•laitn to the land above described before I
St,adstad, Clerk of Circuit Court, at. Sisseton.
S. Oak., on t.ne ."ith dav of August. l'M-2.
Claimimi names as witnesses: Nieolai fc'or
hord. John t.. Jerde. IVder J, Fioan and
Christian (Judem. all of Sisseton S Dak.
Route No. r».
hp
P. D. KRIBS, Register.
Notice of Foreclosure Sale
State of South Dakota,
SH
County of Roberts
ti Circuit Court. 5th Judicial Circuit.
The Uu'ou Central Life lusurauce Company
a corporation, PlainLifT,
VS.
A. VV. LiudquUt. M. Kdna Liudijui.st,. l.
Kyre. G. Li. Knappen, ami Fred 1. Hucting
ton. Trustees in Bankruptcy of the Estate
of Andy Luidquist. Charles G. Lindquist
and i«'red Liudquist as co partners and in
dividual*. Defendants.
NOT1CK IS HHRUHY GIVKN. that by vir
lueot a judgment of foreclosure and aaie in
tile above entitled actiou rendered on the
Hth day ot May, A. D. 1912. and an execution
issued unon .said judurueuN the subscriber.
John Svvansou, sheriff within and /or Kob
erts county. South Dakota for that purpose
appointed, will sell at public auction at the
tront door of the Court House in the city or
Sisseton. County of Roberts and State, of
South Diikola. on th*» Kith day of July A D.
1912 at 2 o'clock in the afternoou of that day.
the real est,ate and mortgaged premises aitd
ite in the County of Roberts and Sea to ol'
South Dakota and directed in said judgment,
and execution to be sol-J. and therein de
scribed us follows:
The Southeast quarter of soccioa seventeen
il?) in township one hundred twenty-three
{128). north of ranjre forty nine (49). west of
the 5th C. M. containing H50 acres more or
less according to the government survey
thereof, or so much thereof a« may be suffi
cient to satisfy said judgment and costs,
amounting in all to the sum of Two Thou
sand One Hundred Forty-one dollars and
thirty cents, with interest thereon from tbe
date of said judgeme.nt, anj all accruing
costs of sale.
Dated une 5th. 1912.
JOHN S. SWANSON
(50-3) Sheriff of Roberts County, S. D,
Bran per ton
Shorts per ton
REMEMBER
that this Meat Market is open only from
8 to 10 o'clock
on Sunday inorni'ij s, and no longer.
Patrons desiring to make purchases on
Sunday must call between these hours as
this rule will he strictly adhered to-
Tto Up-To-Date Meat* Market,
Wm F. MILLER, Proprietor
Sisseton Mill & Light Co.
Solicits your flour trade
$1.40
I N E O I
A O I
Also all kinds of Oils and
Grease for your farm
j| machinery and wagons.
I MONSON BROS. I
0 Effington, S. D. S
Read the Standard
Dakota Pride"
VV
We Sell Hard and Soft Coal
I
BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Tiie Oldest Business College in Minnesota
ESTABLISHED 1847 OVER 10,OOO GRADUATES
N umeruus calls tor omen help, soma paying sis hi^li us 475.1X1 per month to start,
hive heea scut to UH and untitled. the demand for our graduates far exceeds
tin- sutmlv. burKraduar.es :ire competent and receive lioeral salaries from tbK
stun Come, to school wlncb lias had 38 YEARS of successful work latrain
:ni vounir people for office positions. Very reasonable cliarze for tuition and
supplies, vou will be siiiiiliod with your ourse here. A line place to betfin, Uie
HKsiT place to COMl'LE'i'H your worn. Write for booklet C.
122 S. SIXTH STREET MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
We Have It! I
Gasoline and Gas Engine
Oil for your Auto
TRANSMISSION OIL
$23.00
$24.00

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