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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, June 13, 1913, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1913-06-13/ed-1/seq-6/

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RUTH N MAY
Chiropractor
)f von baue trod veryt'iir.g ami failed
to find tv.ilth. tvv rhirprunof .spir.ul)
acinistments. ati 1 vvt weil. Olllve in wed
lu n(is bu Id iK.ur?., i-a. n.. and
to p. m.
William Glasier M. D,
Physician ami Surgeon
OFFICE OVER REXALL DRUG STORE
Office No. 146
Phone:
Residence No. 205
Calls Answered Night or Day.
eave
All Orders at Maldaner's
.. EC
K"
S
DRAY
AND
TRANSFER LINE
HO KS A
General Dray and Transfer
Business.
Furniture anil Viatri Nmvint a ^peciuUv
Gardens Plowed ami Harrowed.
BEN ECK, Prop.
Oo HC» I..IKX
Lands, Loans and
I N S A N E
SISSETOX, De
MURRAY BROS.
DRAY I TEAM WORK
Phone NO. 91,
3 I S S E O N I S
I *Alw-iys Have a Fine Supply of
Fresh and Salt Meats,
OYSTERS, CAME and FISH
In Season
TEe Up-to-date Meat Market
Miller & Jensen
Props.
WE PLEASE YOUR FRIENDS
Let Us Please Yon
Our Portraits combine
the most pleasing charac
teristics of quality and
good workmanship.
Make an appointment to
day at
THE BOWE STUDIO
1895 1913
Pioneer Livery
W. v. WILSON, Prop.
Horses Bought and Sold
Prompt Service. Kates
Reasonable. Phone 58
Whole Family Benefited
By Wonderful Remedy
There are many little things to
annoy us, under present conditions
of life. The hurry, hard work,
noise and strain all tell on us and
tend to provoke nervousness and
irritability. We are frequently so
worn out we can neither eat, sleep
nor work with any comfort. We
are out of line with ourselves and
others as well.
A good thing to do under such
circumstances is to take something
like
3 Dr. Miles' Anti-Pain Pill»
to relieve the strain on the nerves.
«teMrs- J• B. Hartsfield, 33 Corput St.,
^Atlanta Ga., writes:
"I have on several occasions been
«vastly relieved by the use of your med
icines, especially the Anti-Pain Pills
which I keep constantly on hand for
the use of myself, husband and two
sons. Nothing in the world equals them
as a headache remedy. Often I am
enabled by the use of one or two ot
?"J* to continue my housework
when otherwise I would be In bed. My
husband Joins me In my praise of the
Anti-Pain Pills and Nervine."
Dr. Miles' Anti-Pain
At ili-AruggleU, 2f'
Pill.
are relied upon to relieve rT
,\
nervousness and irritability in thou
sands of households. Of* proven
merit after twenty years' use, yon
can have no reason for being longer
without: them.
vi
.....
TREE VEINS AND ARTERIES. f-
Running Sap Still a Source of Wonder
For the Scientist.
How Li- -a 1 iravi-ls from hv nil
iorbiim roots !i 1 hv gr mml.
to 1 hv topmoM I wig 011 ii 11 oak or
vim tree. more than 100 Ivvt aiiuvv
and to nearly four or live times
thai height in 1 hv vase of some ul
the mammoth gum 1 revs (eucalyp
tus) of the Ta.-manian foresi ami
in I hv gigant :v vllingtoiiia o! Vali
fornia. has long puzzled 1 liv phys
icist lo explain.
The "!il idea that capillaritv is
the I'aeV."' a! work, the lluid being
conveved up the 11 unk and branches
after the manner of oil through the
wick of a tamp, becomes an alto
gether inadequate explanation. Es
pecially is this so when we realize
that in some of thv internal tissues
of the stem the pressure exerted
reavhvs from eight lo twenty at
mospheres. or. in oilier words, from
1VO to ,'ii'iO pounds to the square
inch—a force greater than that in
the boiler of a normal railway en
gine.
This mighty pressure, scattered
more or less irregularly through
the tissue.- of the tree, drives the
sap to the buds and forces them
open, expands their leaves and is
constantly at work wherever the
process of building new structures
is going on.
It is obvious, therefore, that the
engineering arrangements for the
conducting ami controlling of this
powerful stream of life giving sap
must be very perfectly organized.
Indeed, they are more than that.
Thvv present marvels of mechanical
construction which are not only me
chanical on account of their perfec
tion. but are so minute that man
can only penetrate the mysteries
and beautv of their structure by
means of high power microscopes
and careful chemical investigations.
Even then he is left batiled and
wondering.—London Strand Maga
zine.
Gluttonous Birds,
Birds in proportion to their
weight probably cat more than any
other living thing. It is a mystery
to naturalists how the ringdove
flics after its accustomed meal. One
dove was found with iSOO peas in its
crop, another in captivity was
known to eat ISO beechnuts at a
time, and a third devoured sixty
acorns. The robin often eats two
snd a half times its weight in twen
ty-four hours, while a barnyard hen
with chicks has been observed to
resume eating 4 75 times in the
course of a day. The diet of a cer
tain species of hawk comprises about
2,000 mice in the course of a month,
besides other food. In the mouth
of a young heron were found three
trout, each weighing three-quarters
of a pound. Another was found
with seven small trout in its mouth,
a mouse and a thrush, evidently on
its way to its nest. The growing
bird seems to have an appetite equal
to that of an adult.—Harper's.
Mexico City's Little Trojan Horse.
One of the chief works of art in
the City of Mexico is the bronze
equestrian statue of Charles IV. It
is called "The Iron Horse" and
"The Little Horse." It stands in
the Plaza de la Rcforma. Visible
from many directions, it serves for
a landmark to visitors unacquaint
ed with the southwestern part of
the city. It was, according to Perry's
"Mexico," the first important bronze
statue made in America. Hum
boldt declared it the second fir est
equestrian statue in the world, the
first being, in his opinion, that of
Marcus Aurelius at Rome. It has
ever been unpopular with the Mexi
cans. It has occupied several sites
in the city, and its several removals
have caused it to be dubbed "El
Cabilito de Troya" (the Little Tro
jan Horse).
Both Sides of the Question.
Mistresses say housekeeping is
wearisome and disheartening. There
are many maids ready to draw good
pay and few ready to do good work.
Many do not know how to work
well, and most do not want to work
well. They all want to get much
and give little.
Maids say housework is tiresome
and discouraging. There are lots
of mistresses read)' to ask for good
work and very few ready to give
good conditions. Lots of them do
not know how to manage well, and
most of them do not want to deal
fairly. They all want to get much
and give little.—Annie Winson in
Atlantic Magazine.
Too Good a Chane« to Mies.
A yeomanry squad was drilling,
and, being out of practice, most of
them were suffering from bruises
caused by the unsteadiness of one
another's movements. "T believe
you have cut my head open," shout
ed a recruit to a nervous comrade,
Who had given him a serious knock.
''Well." «aid the distracted sergeant
in charge, "now is a good time to
put something in it!"— London
Tplogmph.
Gems In Verse
WITH A SONG IN HIS BREAST.
HKWhereIsthe
mils hull llit- sky Is u'eivluuil
AI ul In* strives when the Wf.'i tli
bright.
Weak by the stronger
Hi« bravely keeps up the good fight.
1 ledged round liy relentless conditions.
With needs that will give hin no rest,
lit' rllnus to tho fairest ambition*
Ami toils with a song in hl« brcawt.
Iii- s'rive« und 1h free from resentment
Fur other* whose venture* have paid
And are tivurehing for tiplundld conlcnt-
Awuy fiom the channels of trade.
His task as hv puts Iii» hand to It
is never begun In dltuiiay,
Hut tie gladly endeavor» to do It
A little bit better each day.
He la pitied sometimes by his brothers
Whom Fortune has deigned to make
glad. I
But he wastes no time envying others
Because of the luck they have had.
With faith In the Master above him
And hope that ne'er falters nor swerves
He is cheered by their gladness who love
him
And is loyal to those whom he serves.
Let others whom luck has attended
Look down with contempt if they will.
Ambitions unyielding and splendid
Are ceaselessly urging hint still.
With joy in the strength he is given
To daily accomplish his best
He lags not with those who are driven.
Uut toils with a song in his breast.
S. E. Kiser.
A MEMORY.
what has become of the old fash
ioned lover
Who called for his sweetheart when
sleighing was fine
And took her out riding, by gum, in the
cutter
And drove with one arm draped around
her waist line?
"I..J ICS gut a new fan
«as buggy.
gled self starting
And riding has lost at least one of its
charms.
Because, don't you see. when he's steer
ing the auto
He has to keep driving with both of his
a rtns.
—Selected.
I WONDER IS THERE LAUGHTER?
"J WuNDMU up in heaven is there laugh
-i ter
For her who loved it so,
If. parting past, the joy that followed
after
Made her less loath to go.
I wonder if above the stars' strange sing
ing.
The high angelic praise.
She hears those notes of vagrant laughter
ringing
That gladdened earthly days.
WONDFR if. this little life behind her,
Kternity before.
Some tender thought of love and mirth
might find her
From one who laughs no more.
It matters not. my loneliness, my sorrow,
So she be glad and gay,
But If 1 thought she would not laugh to
morrow
My heart would break today!
Rthel M. Colson.
"KILLED IN ACTION."
[Things havf* mine out against us.—Cap
tain Scott's Diary.j
T111N(ISlegionsout
came against us—
The of the night,
The blind hosts of the blunder
god,
impossible to tight.
Cruel things, monstrous things,
Walking all in white.
They were less than we were.
These things beyond control,
Hut they came out against us
In the deserts round the pole.
hero things may crush our mortal clay
Yet never touch the soul.
From white, unheard of mountains
They swept down like a wind.
Challenging us to save ourselves
And leave the lost behind.
Then—against them, too—things came out.
And we stayed—with the doom assigned.
Conquered, we shall conquer!
They have not hurt the soul!
For there Is another Captain,
Whose legions round us roll,
Battling across the wastes of death
To conquer a darker pole.
The things that bludgeoned us In the
dark—
We have proved they are less than he.
So we can await his trumpets
Through all the years to be,
Secure In the honor of England,
Secure of victory.
—Alfred Noyes.
"LIFE."
A CRUST of bread and a corner to
sleep In
A minute to smile and an hour to weep in
A pint of joy to a peck of trouble.
And never a laugh, but moans come dou
ble.
And that is lite.
A crust and a corner that love makes
precious.
With the smiles to warm and the tears to
refresh us,
And joy seems sweeter when cares come
after.
And a moan is the finest of foils for
laughter.
And that Is life.
I
I
I
I
5
1
L. Dunbar.
ANACREONTIC.
WHAT
is a kiss? A herald
fair
That marahaleth the
way to lov.*
A fleeting breath of
balmy air
Which o'er the lip doth rove:
An evanescent touch that thrills
The ardent lover's trembling
frame:
A dew which on the heart distills
And kindles into flame.
What is a kiss? A lisping sound
Of language all unknown before
The accent of one rapture found
The whispered hope of more
The bending of the boy god's bow
What time the string and arrow
part
The blissful signet to the vow
That yieldeth up the heart.
—James Rose Calvert
-«»CHANCE TO DREAM."
I e° weary, yet 1 fear to sleep.
How
hard It seems to lose myself-te
so
To
that strange world where tyrant
DrMni holde rule,
WWro 1 may kill my friend or wed mj
a
-Mareaiet Oilman George
..
A
A A
A A,
The
April 3, 1006.
Reason Why
Tie VEL1E Wrought Iron Buggy is so
Popular
Kmbodies More Special Features and Strong Points than
any other Line of Vehicles offered.
The ELIE special reach construction, patented June 17, 1907
The YHLIE special dash brace, patented November 4, 1902.
The X* ELIE special shaft heel brraee, pat'd. October 9, 1906.
The VELI E special rail, patented September-25, 1900.
The VEITE special spring wagon body construction, patented
The YEL1E special clamp body corner, patent pending.
The YELIE special wrought iron single reach gear.
The YELIE special wrought iron body and seat ironing.
We carry a full line of
VELIE and JOHN DEERE
Buggies
Rirkert-Ophsim Co.
Sisseton, Soutl? Dakota
RUBBER STAMPS
A N
RUBBER STAMP ACCESSORIES
Seals, Badges, Trade Checks, Steel Dies,
Burning Brands, Stencils. Daters,
Pads, Check Protectors.
Numbering a chines
Orders (Taken at
The Standard (Office
Sisseton, S. D.
»MW iht** «.•#?
1
1
1

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