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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, June 26, 1914, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1914-06-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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HAL'S LONG ORDEAL
By FLORENCE LILLIAN HENDER
SON.
Click!
Hal Duncan woke up from his slum
ber on the sunny side of a pile of
lumber at the sound, rubbed his eyes
und stared suspiciously at a spruce
appearing young fellow "shooting"
him with a camera—and a smile.
"Hey! what are you up to?" chal
lenged the aroused sleeper.
"Oh, I've got a famous story on you
and I wanted your picture to make
jit more interesting," explained Dave
'Lind. "I'm a reporter for the Star.
One of your chums told me about you
and piloted me here. 1 gave him a
dollar to do it. I'll give you five to
I go over what he's told me and add
enough to it to make a two-column
"special'—what do you say?"
Hal Duncan looked bored. It was
inot the first time he had been the
subject of pictorial publicity. Hal
was unique as a tramp and a good
deal of a gentleman. Something of a
mystery, too. It seemed that about
two years since he had appeared
among the hoboes. They made a
favorite of him, for many a story was
told of his care for poor sick fellows
and homeless ones, many a stirring
tale of some thrilling exploits in a
ramble over half the country a fire
discovered in time to save a whole
business block, a knockout of foot
pads who would have killed a victim
but for his interference, the rescue of
two little children from a burning
building.
1
Hal shared everything with his fel
low unfortunates except his moral na
ture of his self-respect'. He never got
down to rags. He was a reformer all
through and had made a famous
speech in behalf of the poor and op
pressed that had got into the papers.
But he was dead to the old world,
where apparently he must have onco.
led a life of what people call re
spectability.
Now for a moment he seemed about
ito resent the proposal of the ener
getic young newspaper reporter, then
with his usual careless self-abandon
ihe shrugged his shoulders resignedly
and said:
"All right. I need the money and
1 guess I can give you good value."
Pathos, adventure, humor—through
many unique shades of rare human in
terest Hal led the interested reporter.
|The Star Had Made a Fearful Mistake.
[The latter regarded the narrator both
pityingly and admiringly.
"There's your money," he said, "and
you've given me some good stuff. I
say, though, it seems a pity to see
ja man of your intelligence wasting
your life like a common tramp. Why,
!my friend?"
"Call it the 'wanderlust,' disgust
with the so-called respectable world!"
laughed Hal. "I have found warmer
Ihearts among the wreckage of human
lity than I ever knew in society."
The "why" of the reporter, who left
'Hal, with a cheery "Good luck," sent
the latter into a sudden reverie.
"Why," indeed! Before his mental
vision passed a series of vivid pic
tures of a small fortune left to him,
of being "the best fellow" in his home
.village.
Then love—his head drooped sor
rowfully as he thought of Hazel
[Green. How he had loved her! how
winsome she had been—but strong
drink had not then relaxed its awful
influence over him. He finally found
•himself penniless. Pride, remorse
tortured him. A man who had money
and position became his rival. Hal
knew that Hazel loved him, but a bet
ter man had come between. Hal left
the town desperate and became a
homeless wanderer.
With a sudden spurt of resolution
he banished the memories that so tor
mented him and arose to his feet. He
placed the five-dollar hill in his
pocket. Then he noticed some papers
the reporter had thrown aside. They
were political campaign documents
reciting the views and giving a speech
Df Rodney Walton, candidate for con
gressman in the district.
These also Hal thrust' into his
pocket. He proceeded to a barber
(Bhop and thence to a store where he
purchased a hat and some collars and
a tie. His clothing was not bad and,
brisked up, he would scarcely have
suggested the tramp to a casual ob
server.
Long since Hal had recognized the
evil of strong drink and had elim
inated that feature of his reckless life.
fThe possession of money made a gen-
erous meal at a restaurant luxury.
Then he secured a cheap room at the
hotel and slept in a real bed for the
first time in months.
There was a fair at Derby, a town
sixty miles away at the extreme edge
of the district. Hal felt like playing
the gentleman while his money lasted.
He bought a ticket for that place, the
morning newspaper and selected a
comfortable seat in the train.
"Hello!" he ejacuated as he opened
the sheet—"here's my story."
There it was and next to it was a
boom for Mr. Walton, the congression
al candidate. And then Hal Duncan
smiled broadly. The Star had made a
fearful mistake. They had got the pic
ture of Hal over the Walton article.
There he posed as the lauded candi
date for congress!
The journey was a slow one and
Hal was glad to put in his time look
ing over the campaign literature he
had picked up the day previous. A
sample speech interested him. Evi
dently Mr. Walton was reaching for
the popular vote. A good many hu
mane sentiments that he enunciated
rather feebly were greatly in accord
ance with Hal's ideas.
"How I would like to set myself
loose on that subject in a genuine
free and easy way!" ruminated Hal.
When he arrived at Derby he found
the fair and a big political meeting
the attractions of the day. Posters
announced a mammoth mass meeting
that fevening to boom a certain ticket
in which Hal noticed the name of Rod
ney Walton.
It was late that afternoon, just as
Hal came out of a restaurant that a
prosperous looking man stopped,
stared at him, drew a newspaper from
his pocket, glanced at it and then
went up to Hal.
"Mr. Walton, surely?" he said. "I
wouldn't have known you only for
your picture in the paper. Why, yov,
must come at once to headquarters.
A speech frotii you will just about fill
out our program."
At once Hal comprehended the situ
ation. A whimsical resolution seized
him. He had been mistaken for Mr.
Walton. He allowed himself to be
introduced to the committee, he was
given a royal banquet. Then the
speeech! Hal Duncan let loose all the
eloquence he possessed.
"Why, the crowd just went wild!"
enthused a committeeman. "Mr. Wal
ton, you have carried the day for us.
We wish to entertain you tomorrow—"
but with the morrow Hal had gone.
The masquerader was a good deal
surprised when a month later the
Star reporter ran across him in an
other town.
"Been looking for you for a week,"
declared the latter. "That speech of
yours elected Mr. Walton. He wants
you—bad."
He wanted this natural orator so
badly that when Hal returned with
the newspaper man to Wellsville, he
engaged him as his secretary forth
with.
Hal Duncan became a changed man.
One day he stole away from Wellsville
and visited the home of his childhood.
It was to find Hazel waiting for him.
Yes, true womanly love had disdained
all new suitors.
"I knew you would come back," she
told Hal, serene in his cherishing
arms. "My heart was with you
through all the long ordeal that has
shown you to be a man among men."
And then there was a wedding and
Congressman Walton gave away the
beautiful bride.
(Copyright, 1914, by W. G. Chapman.)
TALES TOLD OF GREAT ARTIST
Whistler's Peculiarities and His Fits
of Anger Have Furnished "Copy"
for Many Journalists.
The well-known clash with Mr.
George Moore brought forth many ab
surdities, not the least of them being
the correspondence ensuing on the of
fended artist's challenge to a duel,
which Mr. Moore refused on the sooth
ing ground that Mr. Whistler was too
old a gentleman and would be sadly
worsted. The sequel of the duel farce
was a happy play of Moore's upon
Whistler's famous mot, when some
one ranked him with Velasquez, "Why
drag in Velasquez?"
The two foregathered at the same
atelier one Sunday afternoon. They
nearly collided in entering, but Moore
was the first inside. The hostess
heard sounds irorn the hall something
between china breaking and the
stamping of Loots. She went out to
find James in a mighty rage.
"Dear me!" said the lady. "What
Is the matter, dear master?"
"Whistler won't come in! Whistler
Won't stay under the same roof with
that wild Irishman."
Moore, in tjie inside, remarked in
his sweetly nodulated voice, "Why
drag in Whistler?"
One of the most characteristic con
versations with the great artist is re
ported by Frederic Keppel.
Mr. Keppel first called upon the art
ist at the Tite street studio, where
the famous portrait of Sarasate,
"Black on black," stood at the end of
the long corridor that he used to form
a vista for proper perspective of his
work. Laying his hand on Keppel
shoulder, he said:
"Now, isn't It beautiful?"
"It certainly is," was the reply.
"No," said he, "but isn't it beauti
fui?"
"It Is. indeed," said Keppel.
Whistler raised his voice to a
scream.
"Damn it. man!" he piped, "isn't it
BEAUTIFUL?"
Adopting the emphasis, Mr. Keppel
shouted:
"Damn it, it is!"
This was satisfactory.
SOPHIE'S GENEROSITY I
By EVELYN HÖGE.
Sophie sat bolt upright beside her
mother and listened with wide round
eyes. In the first place there was a
strange man in Doctor Stewart's pul
pit and lie talked in a ringing resonant
voice and his words rushed as if he
were afraid lie would not have time to
say all he wanted to say. Doctor Stew
art almost drawled and did not lean
over the pulpit edge with nervous
hands outstretched as did this man.
So this man was well worth watching.
The man was telling an absorbing
tale of his missionary work in a cer
tain section of the country. When he
ended he «aid simply but forcibly that
the people among whom he worked
needed anything and everything. "Not
only money," he said, "but clothes, all
the necessaries of life. Think of what
I have told you and give freely!"
Sophie hop-skipped alongside her
mother when they reached the open
air. "What are we goin' to give?" she
inquired breathlessly.
Sophie's mother laughed shortly. "I
haven't any idea," she said. "We sent
all our old clothes to the mission and
I'm short of money. 1 need a great
many
It was the next day that Sophie sat
thinking. Mother had said they mould
send something, but mother was out
for the day and nothing had been sent.
Sophie slid down from the couch and
wandered about, frowning. Maybe the
poor people were freezing to death at
that very moment.
She decided that she might as well
save her mother the trouble of sending
things, inasmuch as her mother's con
sent had been won. Sophie proceeded
to her mother's large closet.
For a moment she stood sniffing de
lightedly the faint fragrance of violet
sachet that emanated from all the
She rubbed her hands delightedly
over the violet velvet dress. That
could go—mother had said the last
time she wore it that she just hated
it because Celeste had botched it. The
poor folks would be glad of it even if
it was botched. They could wear it
to market or something.
And that pink chiffon evening dress
—hadn't mother remarked that she
simply never would wear the thing
again after what Mrs. Smith said about
a woman of her age appearing in girl
ish colors?
There was the blue serge, too—cer
tainly mother could give that when
she had three other cloth dresses.
And here were five coats—well, this
looked most like being given away, the
brown, silky one, with the nice fur
collar and l'ur cuffs. It was remark
able how easily everything com
pressed into a suitcase. There would
be plenty of room for some things of
father's for some poor, freezing man.
After searching through the gar
ments in father's closet and anxiously
studying them Sophie decided on a
suit father didn't seem to care about
At any rate, he never wore it.
I
Sophie carefully folded up the long
tailed coat and the rest of the things
and added them to the suitcase. She
took a handful of socks for good meas
ure. It happened that her hands land
ed in the end of the drawer devoted to
her parent's silken footwear. Then
with a relieved eigh she snapped shut
the suitcase and slipped out.
"From mother" Sophie told the won
en at the church who were receiving
things for the missionary box. She
beamed angelically.
"What a good little girl to carry this
all the way!" said one of the women.
I
things myself and if I do get any
money there's that tea I must give—"
Sophie's mind wandered. Teas were
vague things that required little girls
to stay upstairs.
"That child is possessed," Sophie's
mother said later in the day, when for
the sixth time Sophie begged to know
what they could give the missionary's
people. "Goodness me! As if one
wasn't driven nearly crazy with hands
out on every side! Don't bother me
now—oh, we'll send something."
MSfcr
We Goin' to Give?"
"What Are
things decorously clothed in overhang
ere and hanging in a straight row on
the brass rod that ran across the lit
tle room. Then she set to work.
That evening Sophie's mother had
an excited conversation over the tele
phone. Then she said to Sophie's fa
ther: "It's only because the suitcase
had my name on it that they knew
whom to call up. Your dress suit—and
my new marten trimmed coat—and my
best gowns—why, it's perfectly dread
ful!"
Sophie's father chuckled. He medi
tated on the dress suit.
"I
wish," he said, daringly, "that there
'hadn't been any name on the suitcase.
Sophie's heart is in the right place,
-anyway."—Chicago Daily News.
is til-
fixing up y.
ib!e to help
have in a spie.
Couch Covers.
1 also hand I
machine mi
goods over be:
TAk'INQ OFF
A FEW LIMBS
1 SEE
How's This
We offer One Hundred Dollars
Reward for any case of Catarrh
that cannot be cured by Hall's
Catarrh Cure.
F. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo, O.
Wo, the undersigned, have known
THE GOOD JUDGE AND THE TREE TRIMMER
JUST by the taste and the way
it keeps you tobacco satisfied, you
can tell that "Right-Gut" is the Real To
bacco Chew. Pure, rich, mellow tobacco
—seasoned and sweetened just enough.
And it is a ready chew. Less than a quarter
'your old size chew keeps you satisfied. The
Jkvor comes along so steady and naturally that
nobody ever notices that you are chewing.
vThat's a big satisfaction in itself, to say nothing'
of the better flavor and comfort.
«The Real Tobacco Chew BSr®
10 Cento a Poucn
A SK your dealer today.
he doesn't sell "Right-
Cut," send us 10 cents in
stamps. We'll send you a
pouch.
We guarantee it tm
4e pare chewing
tobacco and better
than tKm old kind.
NATIONAL, BANK OF COMMERCE,
Toledo, O.
Hail's Catarrh fun- is taken internailv.
ili l.v ujK.n the blond a ml rnu
of :ho system. Testimonial»
7 5 S
by
••'.!! I rucprists.
I? 11
1
I' V' 11« Pfin«r» I
The only way to
get the
yennine
New Home
Sewing Machine
is to buy the machine
with the name NEW
HOME on the arm
and in the legs.
This machine ii
warranted for all
almost
No other like it
No other as good
The New Home Sewing Machine Company,
ORANGE. MASS.
For Sale by T. W. Cahill
se Furnishings
to order your wall paper and begin
uoiiie. Nut alone in this line are we
inak" your home attractive, but we
new line of Lace Curtains, Drapery
i'i Trimmed Spanish Leather Kockers.
ihe Free Sewing Machine, the best
market.
buying.
Sisseton, S. D-
VtP:
and
i"b qivE
WEYMAN-BRUTON COMPANY
50 UM Hm, Mew Y*k
V.
J.
CLfiit-y for the last 15 years, and believe
hirn perfectly honorable in all business
transactions iincl financially able* to carry
out any obligations niiule bv his firm.
Come in and look these
T. W. AH
ILL
one of
me own for
A Quid
OF THE ft SAL TOBACCO^
CHEW
RIGHT-CUT
CHEWING
TOBACCO
WEYMAN-BRUTON CO.
CHICAGO. IH.
LADIES! SECRET TO
DARKEN GRAY HAIR
Bring back color, gloss and thickness
with Grandma's recipe of Sage
and Sulphur.
Common garden sage brewed into a
heavy tea. with sulphur and alcohol
added, will turn gray, streaked and
faded liair beautifully dark and luxuri
ant remove every bit of dandruff, stop
sculp itching and falling hair. Mixing
the Sage Tea and Sulphur recipe at home,
though, is troublesome. An easier way is
to get the ready-to-use tonic, coating
aljout 50 cents a large bottle, at drug
stores, known as "VVyeth's Sage and
Kulphur Hair Remedy," thus avoiding a
lot of muss.
While wispy, gray, faded hair is not
sinful, we all desire to retain our youth
ful appearn nee and attractiveness. By
darkening your hair with Wyeth'a Sage
and Sulphur, no one can tell, because it
does it so naturally, so evenly. You
just dampen a sponge or soft brush with
it and draw this through your hair,
taking one small strand at a time by
morning all gray hairs have disappeared.
After another application or two your
hair becomes beautifully dark, glossy,
soft and luxuriant and you appear yean
younger.
HOTS-:
V, 7"«^
fcO
Minneapolis Dollar-Hotel
200 MODERN ROOMS
Located i:i Heart of Dutincts Dit1r:cfc
$1.££ SINGLE RATE $1.52
europlan rate for two FcnrcNO $1.50
PRIVATE BATH AND TOILET CXTftA
COMPLETE SAFETY
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS
AND FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION
(INSURANCE RECORDS SHOW NO i.rVCS
EVER LOST IN A SPRINKLED BUILDING.)
EVE»
rOOM
HAS HOT AND CCIO FuNf- NO
WATER. STEAM HEAT, CAS A N
O ELCCTF.lC
*rc TELEPHONE S-IRV CC.
SE-'CN STORY ANNEX IN CONNECT.ON.
k/'
4
F. J. SCHEFFLER
Physician and Surgeon
Calls Answered Day or Night
Phone No. 137, Res. 118
Offlee Over Swanberg Shoe Store
Sisseton, S- D.
RUTH N HAY
Chiropractor
II yon have tr'eii everything und tailed
to tlnil health, try Chiropractor (spinel)
adjustments, »nil get well. Office in Swed
lurnl's building, iloura, IS a. in. and
7 to 0 p,
1895 1918
Pioneer Livery
W. D. WILSON, Prop.
Horses Bought and Sold
Prompt Service. Bate?
Reasonable. Phone 58
William Glasier, Ii. D.
Physician and Surgeon
OFFICE OVER REXÄLL DRUG STORE
Office No. 146
Phone:
Residence No. 205
Calls Answered Night or Day.
Leave All Orders at Maldaner'e
Drs. Williams Gross
Veterinary Surgeons
Chas. Williams, D. V. S.
Herman Gross, D. V. M.
Phone No. 37
Calls Answered Day or Night
WE PLEASE YOUR FRIENDS
Let Us Please You
Our Portraits combine
the most pleasing charac
teristics of quality and
good workmanship.
Make an appointment to
day at
THE BOWE STUDIO
MURRAY BROS.
DRAY & TEAM WORK
Phone- NO. 91.
31
SSETON -S. O.
RHEUMATIC SUFFERERS
SHOULD use
5 O S
The Bemt Remedy
Fa* mil forma of
Rheumatism
LUMBAGO.
SCIATICA. GOUT. NEURALGIA.
AND KIDNEY TROUBLES.

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