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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, July 02, 1915, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1915-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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RiTTMAN PROCESS
NEARLY PERFECT
United States Will Make Gaso
line Cheaper With Method,
BENZOL PRICE TO BE LESS.
Secretary Lane Says It Will Be on a
Commercial Working Scale Very
Soon—Government Ready to Make
Arrangements For Manufacture With
Any Concerns That Desire.
Washington.—Secretary Lane of the
department of the interior la trying to
preserve for the people of the United
Stales I lie processes devised b.v Dr.
Walter F. Uittinan, chemical engineer
of the bureau of mines, to procure gas
ollne and benzol at a much lower cost
than that at which they are now ob
tained.
"Kxeellvnt progress Is being made In
the development of the Uittinan pro
cess," said Secretary Lane, "and there
Is every reason to believe that both the
gasoline and the benzol processes will
be on a commercial working plane
within a reasonably short time. I am
Photo by American Frees Association.
Dlt. WAT/ritll P. RITTMAN.
Informed that the gasoline process is
now ready for large scale Industrial
applications, ami the hope Is expressed
that the benzol process will be ready
soon.
"The benzol priK-ess la being devel
oped hi eo-operation with a New York
company, which has entered into an
agreement whereby all patentable
equipment, processes and Ideas avail
able as a result of the co-ojeratlve
work will be turned over to the depart
ment to be dedicated to the public.
"The department stands ready and
Is anxious to enter into similar agree
ments with any other companies In the
country that will agree to the same
terms—that all processes and Ideas
patentable In the development of ei
ther process shall be turned over to the
department for use of the public.
"The department is willing for all
who are desirous of making use of the
processes to do so to the fullest possible
extent consistent wt:h the proper pro
ted ion of the process, In order that
the public may derive the greatest
measure of benelit therefrom. It looks
as If it would be only a short time be
fore the complete mechanical equip
incut necessary for l!:e practice of the
pro- esses has been worked out and the
Inventions covered by patent applica
tions.
"The department considers that all
those desirous of employing the proc
esses should agree lo contribute to the
public, in the same manner that Dr.
Kitt man has done with his basic pat
cuts, all patentable ideas that may
WEDDING ON RIVER BRIDGE.
I
1
Use Idaho License, Calling Pastor Eom
Lewislon, hin. Mrs. Mmnl Kstes
of Kamiah and A. .1 Stuart of Stilen
were united in iri'iagr a few days
auo on the Lewisjnn 'larlvstiui bridge,
just on tin
1
Idaho side he uild« ban
i(• 1 of th»* SuaUi- river. Tin* parties
had eothe to Lewislon eXJleet iliU t" be
married by their pastor, the Uev. J. l:.
York of the llaptist eliureh of Stiles,
fcliu was In atlendaiiee at an assoeia
tiun meet lug a I Üarkst on. learning
of tlieir mission they were invited to
A SEVEN FOOT "COP."
Grantsburg's Chief Tips Scales at 340
Pounds.
(irantsburg. Wis.- This city, peace
ful as it Is, lniasts of the largest chief
of police in the world. He Is I ust An
derson, who Is seven feet four Inches
In height, and, though perfectly well
proportioned, weighs 1)40 pounds, lie
Is the only tail member of a big family
and came here from Sweden, where
he was born In IHT'J.
He servwl a short time on the police
force at Superior, until he was strick
en with typhoid fever. This giant
came to this country In 1S1M and for
thirteen consecutive years has been
chief of police.
CHINA WANTS TO BE
THE WORLD'S TOY SHOP
Promoters lo Manufacture All
Kinds of Playthings.
New York.—Korty thousand dollars
was spout for toys, most of it. in Now
York, by Cluing Kt Kalo, a special re|
resentative of the Chinese government,
who came to the United States several
weeks ago with the Chinese commis
sion. He bought everything In the
shape of a toy or dinner la vor made of
metal which he could Und. Mr. Chang
Is now busy in seeking among manu
facturers of machinery for men who
can build machines to make in China
the toys which before the war were
practically all made In Germany.
China, with her cheap labor and
cheap sailing ship freights, promises to
compete with the toymakers at Nu
remberg, l-'uersch and Thtlt, who have
supplied toys for most of the civilized
world for generations. Many of the
toys were purchased also for their edu
cational value In the schools of China.
One sample of every sort of toy was
sought by Mr. Chang, not only from
the great toy Importing houses and big
retail shops, but the Bowery was
searched for the cbeajHjr articles.
Prices paid ranged from three for a
cent to $750 for a miniature model
boiler, burning coal dust, attached to a
complete miniature Corliss engine and
electric generator. Tills last was pur
chased in Philadelphia and was used
by the proprietor of a big toy shop to
run all sorts of toy machines in his
shop window.
The engines purchased ranged from
one operated by alcohol Maine at {.*
cents to the Corliss, which cost $110
alone, livery sort of toy lathe, saw and
stamp mill Is represented In Mr.
Chang's collection. He has twenty sets
of toy loocomotlves, from a pewter
model at 10 cents to one with appa
ratus for supplying Its motive power
at $21).
One set of lead soldiers cost $1SS. It
Includes every arm of military service,
with mountain and field batteries, a
l!ed Cross ambulance, forage wagons
and automobile trucks.
Boats at three for a cent are at one
side of a collection which Includes a
complete battleship that cost
Printing outlits from $V.tu to $15 are In
the collection, with boys' carpenter tinl
boxes of every size.
Ik»
conceived as a result of the employ
ment of these processes.
"Tills is the only condition that the
department imposes, and its reason:*
bleness will become apparent when It
is considered that Dr. Ulttman has
given to the public, through the depart
ment, processes which conservatively
might be worth millions of dollars
were they controlled by a private in
dustrial concern exclusively for its
seltish purposes.
"As soon as the department is as
sured that the public's interests are
properly safeguarded a full and com
plete scientific paper describing the
processes will be issued. In the mean
time the processes will be open to any
one who wishes to develop them under
the conditions Imposed.
"At the first public demonstration of
the Ulttman benzol and gasoline proc
esses held before the representatives
of the army and navy and large manu
facturing concerns announcement was
made that both processes might be
used by all Interested persons upon ap
plication to the department At the
same time, however, because of the de
sire to, give the public the fullest pos
sible benefit of the Rlttman processes
It was stated that the use of the proc
eases would be coupled with the con
ti dltlon that the person using the same
^wiuld give to the public the benefits of
j&riffuch ideas along mechanical lines as
fthey might conceive during the em
ployment of the processes."
SEE BRILLIANT METEORITE.
Made Night Bright as Day—Its Fall
Shook tho Earth.
Orangeburg. S. ('.—A wonderfully
brilliant meteorite was Seen and the
explosion was heard in this city and
county recently about 2 o'clock a. m.
Many people saw the bright mass as
it fell toward the earth and a police
man in Orangeburg felt the earth I rem
hie and heard the courthouse windows
shake.
Some of th. most interesting facts
brought to light so far are to'rt bv .1 S
Evans of near Kllorce He was sittinu
by a window that was opened In he
right direction to get a full view. Tile
brilliance of the falling meteor wa
very marked, rendering the country as
light as day. and it finally passed out
of sight north by "2 degrees east.
Mr. Kvans observed about what time
It, was, and eight minutes later heard
the explosion. By basing a calculation
upon the difference in the rapidity with
which light and sound waves travel he
estimated It was between three and
four hundred miles away, and follow
ftnjer that direction would nnko the loca
tion of the meteor'some distance out at
sea off the coast of Maryland.
Rewarded For Good Advice.
Yonltei-s. X. \\—Because Police Cnp
taln George Pooley ail vised his men to
read the Bible or other Rood literature
while idle woman has made him ex
ecutor of her $1.000.(100 estate, which
will pay him a foe of $'.1.000.
U-51 MADE TRIP TO
CONSTANTINOPLE
Captain Te'is tiow He Took
Submarine 3,000 Miles.
DODGED MANY ENEMY SHIPS
1
be married In the association meeting.
but this was impossible because I he
license was obtained in Idaho, and so
the meeting adjourned to the center of
the bridge.
Attacked Four Times on Voyage From
Wilhelmshaven to the Dardanelles,
but Escaped Each Time by Diving,
Describes How He Sank Two Big
British Warships.
Chicago.- -In an interview with cor
respondent of The Chicago Daily
News, cabled from Constantinople oil
June 1, Captain Otto Herslng has told
the story of his voyage in the German
submarine 1' 51 from Wilhelmshaven
to Constantinople, about
ü.ihM)
miles,
toward the close of which he sunk the
British battleships Triumph and Ma
jestic.
"We left Wilhelmshaven April 25."
'aptaln Herslng said. "When 1 was
told that 1 was going to Constantinople
I said: *(jood! That Is worth while.'
I let only the first oflicer and the chief
engineer into the secret to explain the
Increased supplies taken aboard. We
slipped quietly out of Wilhelmshaven,
as have so many other submarines go
ing Into the war area. We kept on the
surface most of the time, watching for
big ships of the enemy, but failed to
see any for a long flute, lo our great
disappointment.
"Off the coast of England we were
finally tired upon by a destroyer and
had to dive for safety, but along the
French mat we encountered no en
emy. When 100 miles from Gibraltar
we were lired upon by other British
destroyers. We walttnl outside Gibral
tar and passed through the strait early
In the morning in plain view, but with
out drawing a single shot, or attracting
the least attention. Those were tense
but gratifying hours.
"Once within the Mediterranean the
watch, already exacting, was redou
bled. Here again we encountered ships
of the enemy near a small Island, but
dived to safety under lire. When
passing Malta we were fired upon by a
French destroyer, but were untouched.
We then proceeded south of Oreece
into the Aegean sea and to the Dar
danelles.
"We arrived there on the night pre
ceding May 25. ha vlug come from Wil
helmshaven in exactly one month. In
the early morning light we saw the
Triumph and the Majestic lying off the
coast, constantly encircled by destroy
ers. Through the periscope 1 saw a
destroyer coming directly for us. We
dived, and the destroyer passed im
mediately over us with a sound like
that of a motorcar.
"We came up Immediately. 1 took
aim through the periscope and pressed
the button, automatically firing the
torpedo, and the projectile slipped
noiselessly Into the water. We dived
again. The explosion which followed
was as terrific as though it had been
In the fore part of the submarine itself.
"Then we lay hidden two days and
a half," continued Captain Herslng,
"after which we came up again In
the midst of the British ships. Just be
fore noon, looking through the peri
scope, 1 saw the Majestic surrounded
by ten ships steaming around her in a
constant circle for her protection. 1
could see the Majestlc's sailors on the
deck taking their noonday nap. 'Shall
I disturb them?" 1 thought. Then, see
ing a welcome space between the en
circling ships, I pressed the electric
button and the torpedo was going right
It caught the Majestic a little to the
rear of amidships.
"We dived again. We noticed that
the bombardment from the ships had
ceased, for they had been shelling the
Turkish html positions.
"We remained submerged for several
hours, and then came to the surface to
II ml the British ships had disappeared,
and all search for them was in vain.
We reached Constantinople, having
passed forty-two days in the submarine
without rest or change."
NAVY DESERTIONS DECREASE
Statistics Show That Few American
Sailors Leave the Service.
Washington.—Statistics compiled hy
the navy department of the number of
desertions from the navy show a
marked decrease since the system was
Inaugurated of putting deserters and
leave breakers on parole Instead of
sending them to Jail.
During the fiscal year ended June
,'i0. 101.1, there was nn average of 21U
desertions a month. Admiral Fletcher
has notified the secretary that during
April. IDl.'i, of the 55.01)0 men in the
navy only sixty deserted from the At
lantic licet Itiiturns have not yet
been received from the Pacific and
Asiatic squadrons, but Mr. Daniels
said that, it was safe to predict that the
number would be a great deal less than
I» former years.
Girls Played Real Burglar*.
Tacoma. Wash.—Two fourteen-year
old schoolgirls played burglars as a
lark and left rich loot at poor persons'
homes and cheap stuff at homes of the
rich, keeping nothing themselves.
Kisses at $1 Each.
Wichita, Rat).—A jury gnre woman
in a breach of promise suit $1 for each
kiss marked "X" In defendant's letters
There were 32.'$ X's.
II 11' sisskton \VI I LY STANDARD.
NEWSB0Y MAKES A
I..I
I
™'raKE-V/h*
War Brings Wealth to Youth
Save His Permits.
P: idgopurt. Conn.- War lias breu-'«
lrMr,.crity CI •*T.uck" lio-.-.
newsboy, twenty i.vn c.-ms oil. so rap
idly that he
1. 11 a steam
he put !i
decj'Jc I whelh' tu
liv I i!i: from
i\ s.i'«ul i:ca er-, into a
A von I' k. in Iii- e.i -lent part
lie it -i 111:: a tie •. heiv
on of ):Ki. The iirTe:iM"l sale o!
newspapers, due to lie war. has ena
bled him to pay oil' the mortgage—but
that is not all.
The lot I'.u Ii" owns tands in the
path of the building progress eastward
which the rapidly eMeiidmg munitions
plants are making. hie day recently a
real estate operator representing un
named Interests offered *l).000 for the
lot He was pondering over this coin
pllment to his sagacity when a repre
sentative of the British government
came along with an offer of Sizo.000.
The conference ended when "Buck"
submitted a counter proposal I hat the
British government lease the land for
a term of years at a year and
that the munitions company, for which
Great Britain is eager to build a fac
tory. give him one-half of the profits
from its product.
MADE
AN
ORPHAN BY
LUSITANIA DISASTER
Pretty New York Girl Tells of
Experiences on Vessel.
New York—"If the ship's otlicers
had not assured us there was no dan
ger and that the vessel would not sink
I think more lives would have been
sa ved."
This is the opinion of Miss Virginia
II. I^uiey of Huntington, X. V.. a sur
vivor of the Lusitania disaster, who
arrived here, accompanied by Mrs.
Harry Sedgwick.
Miss I^oney. who is sixteen, but large
for her years, was greatly saddened by
Photo by American Press Association
MISS VIRGINIA LONEY.
the loss of her parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Allen 1. l.oney, who accompanied her
on the disastrous trip of the Cnnardcr.
"Five minutes before the Lnsltania
sank." she said, "two oilircrs went
annual I he deck and assured ns there
was no danger. As soon as the tor
pedo struck lis my father went below
to get life preservers. He procured
some, but used none for himself. My
father and mother both insisted that I
get into one the lifeboats that was
being lowered. I did not want to
leave them. hut they insisted in a fond
way that I go. The boat was upset
and I was thrown into the sea, where
1 drifted for about ten minutes. Then
1 was picked up. My father and moth
er went down with the ship."
Miss l.oney took an oar that had
fallen from tlie hands of a sailor who
had collapsed and did her share of
the rowing until the survivors were
taken aboard a trawler.
While the St. Vatil was being con
voyed through the war zone by two
itritish destroyers. Mrs. Sedgwick, her
companion, suddenly exclaimed: "See!
There is a submarine!"
Miss l.oney became greatly agitated,
and. turning her gaze from the sea.
said: "No. no! 1 can't stand it again."
The ship's otlicers said the periscope
of a Itritish submarine might have
been seen, but that no German craft
had come to the surface during tho
run through the war zone.
GAVE UP MORPHINE SUPPLY.
Woman, Sixty-four.Thcn Asked to Be
Sent Away.
Kvansville. Ind.—Declaring she was
determined to win in a tight against
the drug habit, to which she had been
addicted many years. Mrs. Maud Lynn,
aged sixty-four, walked into the ofllce
of Samuel Wurm, township trustee of
Pigeon township here, and presented
Wnrm with a cardboard box contain
ing about $50 worth of morphine.
The woman told the trustee the mor
phine was all the property she had and
that she wished to part with it on con
dition that she be sent to a sanitarium
to be cured of the drug habit. She was
sent to a local hospital.
I ABOUT LIVE STOCK.
Feed the calf lightly until It Is five
to seven weeks old, giving not over
ten to twelve pounds of milk daily.
Later the amount may be Increased to
fourteen or sixteen pounds and at
three months may, though not always,
go to about twenty pounds. The
amount fed, however, must lie careful
ly regulated by tile ability of the calf
to haudle it without scouring.
Cleanliness is a big factor in the suc
cessful raising of sheep.
Raise roots for the sheep. They are
relished, and it Improves their health.
Sugar heels rank first, rutabagas next,
then pumpkins. Four to five pound*
daily to each sheep will Improve their
«general health and make the meat ten­
Julius Aasness, Mgr.
Land Loans
The Farmers State Bank
has moved to Hammer. I
will continue the real estate
business at the old stand.
If you want to buy, sell or
exchange real estate of any
kind come in and see me.
H. L. SPACKMAN
SISSETON S. DAKOTA
Land and Land Loans
der and Juicy.
A good ram has a broad head, cliest
and back, short thick neck and shoul
ders and straight hind legs.
There is no kind of animal breeding
that will iuy better than the breeding
of horses, but horses that will sell, not
"dunghills" or misllts.
It Is impossible to develop a colt Into
a sound, serviceable horse If it is kept
tied on a hard floor day in and day out
through the winter.
Hick's a Wolf Terror.
Atchison, Kan. Hick Colgnn, fa
mous wolf catcher, whose home Is near
tills city, has captured a total of 72!)
wolves. He has a bird dog that locates
the dens. He receives a bounty of $5
for gray wolves and $1 for coyotes.
Since the llrst of this year lie has cap
tured thirty-nine of the animals.
"Make Your $$ Have More Cents"
Before buying building material for a house or barn,
you will do well to consult us as we have had years of
experience and may be able to help you either, in the
selection of a plan or the material to use after plan is
selected.
The service is free and we are only waiting for you
to let us know that you either expect or hope to build.
LAMPERT LUMBER COMPANY.
BELGIAN FARMERS COMING.
Farms Have Been Stocked For the
Colony Near Wilmington, N. C.
London.—A small party of Belgian
farmers whose farms have been laid
waste will leave Liverpool shortly for
New York en route to farms near Wil
mington, N. C. The farms have been
stocked for them, houses erected and
furnished. Steamship and mil way
lines are co-operating by reducing
fares, so that the whole journey may
be accomplished for as little as $25
per head.
The colony will be known as Little
Kelgimu. The project has been ap
proved by the American secretary of
agriculture.
Legal Blanks at this office.
Sisseton, S. D.

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