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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, November 24, 1916, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1916-11-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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SI SSETON WEEKLY STANDARD
..... By Walter L. Johnson V:
Subscription $1.50 Per Year.
Official
Paper of County and City
Industrial Education
1
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and a stronger organization isj
at work to establish new fads.
and functions.
-al training lor boys. lmnestK'j.
wsienee for girls, ganlvning
and agriculture for all shoul
Pacific
jy? the limit, says the
Coast Manufacturer.
Kuil fledged business ™H
lego are being established 1,1
high .«chools and c\cn =i'l!
a stenographer and every boy|
a bookkeeper is the slogan.
The ability to sing, wood
work and moial work for bovs
needle work and cooking
girls and to produce from
soil are universal needs.
""'"'Selection wa a eoniparaiivelv
tinu ip (lf
1 y, typewriting, ins
b,
I
rects girls' minds toward home
life.
A knowledge of growing
things from the
soil
"S-O-M-E Doughnut!"
"Any time you want real 1
goodies use Calumet Baking
Powder! My mother uses it—
she's tried all others she's
learned her lesson now she
sticks to Calumet.
Unequalled for making
tender, wholesome, light buk-
tact* Wonderful'leavening and raising
qoalltlet—enlloim teiults. Mother «ay*
Calumet the
eoai economical to buy—
moet economical to use. Try It at once."
RniM Hlgkwl
pie and education to enable hearts soon became a custom Cleveland,
them to exist is vital. a custom, and as the years
To educate them all out of sped this custom became fix
the producing class ai.d into led, until today it assumes the
1
minds to channels of useful |acres of our fair domain I
labor, domestic training di- been garnered
Awnrde
Ufa»
OnIInI
Ftw—Cm
tUf im
1
masses must lc inuiv diiveted
I
Agony Is Past
he
Limit.
Public sehool taxes
creasing faster than al
Everybody is glad the na
tional election is a tiling of
the past—for another four
itc il|T li| iu mul vts
nev
,,
rl)ll lt ss
jin
I line
11 ts of nwsic. manu-, seen
Isine5!8
ri
com
a .semi-professional idea of sacredness of a permanent in- Davis and David Armstrong were mar-
living by soft-hahded employ- |stitution.
monts is a great mistake. This season is again with
Manual training turns bo^s'| us. The fruits of the broad
will help almost every fireside.
many of them to supply the Our President and the gov
family table and keep down ornwrs of the various states
the high cost of living. have {designated the day on
Public education for the which the people shall ex
press to a bountiful Creator
their gratitude for these bless
ings.
firm.
to making the average man And over ami a hove all
and woman self sustaining in'else we have he thahkful
the home and family life. that a merciful Ood has so
the hearts ami lives
Although the
years. .Although the late
^„sed stagnation
l.usine^for a week. Everv-
km
I to be thinking
l|oils 1)u|hiva lines aihl then
ls a svl i()lls ilit
ch along coin-
was a serious
mereial lines.
Now that the agony is over
there is no exuu.se for anv let-
ought
ght along and the
ear should witness a
a niv val of val estate and
othev duvmailt lines in
1 akota.
for
the
Fi
South
THA\KSGIV1\G
the bind-
mil the time of
of the Pilgrim
1 1 ,1 ,11 1 1 Mrs. I.ula Clilnn and lives with liei
-dramatic art. basketball, cat- Americans have been accus-,
eterias, Ureek letter societies tomed to set aside one day in intends to graduate. Nearly twenty
yen re ago she was torn in Canton,
piepai mg lnc\ «UHI Ii t? ll JUKI tilkt1 ^tock ill 1116 Miss Chiiiu ran write and
serving pink teas are not. dealings of Providence
Nine children out of ten us as a people.
who go to the public schools What was at first the spoil
are going to he working peo- tnneous expression of grateful
lave
m. The ware­
houses anp granaries are fair-
ly loaded with their contents drifted apart. Armstrong married, so
.. did his lirst love, and then nearly forty
anp prosperity sets a guest at years passed a way.
And to the many positive
and material blessing which
have been ours, there is ad
ded 011 this occasion the
especial blessing that we as a
people have escaped the mad
ness that has fallen as a blight
upon our neighbors and kins
man across the waters. The
magnitude of that blessing
we cannot at this time begin
to estimate.
But while we have these
palpable blessings for which
to be thankful, we have other
things for which to express
our gratitude, and these ante
date and underlie our present
lappiness and prosperity, our
ea«e aiul safety. We have
to
be
thankful
that
the
days
and
back in
when
our
jeing
nation was
born,
a land of
heroes,
than whom the world has
never produced greater, had
mpressed upon their hearts
to lay the foundation of that
nation upon the only possible
true
lasting base—the
Fatherhood of an omnipotent
God and the brotherhood of
man.
And we have to be thank
ful that all down the years
since that time there have
been heroic souls— worthy
souls of noble sires—who have
never ceased to call to us with
clarion, voice to watch and
«preserve the old landmarks,]See?1•eewoepewf!*the
__ _j plant our feet upon the
*^*0^1 everlasting rock and standi Jtiaati
LWliS
THE SISSETON WEEKLY STANDARD
moulitei
of the people of this nation
that we arc enabled to look
above and beyond -elf and
ee for ouisclves the great
principle-: of eternal truth and
ju.-tice that must ultimately
rule the whole earth that we
are enabled to grasp the truth
that an injury to ourselves,
and that a kindness to our
fellows calls down a benedict
ion upon our own heads.
So that the one supreme
blessing for which we should
at this reason return thanks,
is the fact that our Uod has
enabled us as a people to
know and to do the right.
And let our prayer be. that
it may ever be thus with this
people.
First Chines* Girl Student.
I Seattle, Wash.—Miss Margaret Chiun
of Seattle Is the lirst Chinese woman
ever
«'«til'.'tilatc at the University
1 of Washington. She has registered for
Fathers, a full course. She is the daughter of
motluM
.llt
124S
i,,gstreet. Mts.ci.im,
with the Chinese language with ease
despite her long residence here.
AGED PERSONS MARRY.
Th,t Endl a
Romance That Began
Nearly Half a Century Ago.
A romance which
had its birth a half century ago in the
public schools of Niles. but which was
broken up by a lovers' quarrel, culml-
,!'!!cll,litI!•.tleming
ho arson Ke of ,lle
THE S
ISS ETON WEEKLY STANDAlJD
n*v-
I Alfred when Mrs. Kmuia
l'leil. Mrs. Armstrong is flfty-eight
years old, her husband Is sixty-two.
Armstrong and Ills bride were play
mates in Mies fifty years ago. Almost
constant association brought their two
hearts together, and as years passed
plans were made for their marriage.
Armstrong was then twenty-one.
Then came the lovers' quarrel—a
trivial disagreement—und the twain
Death left them single again, and
fate drew them together. Both settled
in Cleveland scarcely a thousand yards
apart. Their love dream of youth was
resumed. And they began courting
anew. The aged "newlyweds" will
make their home in Cleveland.
SHARK KILLS FISHERMAN.
Florida Man's Leg Chewed Up by Mon
ster Caught In a Nst.
West Palm Bench.—J, L. Hanscom
died in a hospital at Fort Pierce as
the result of being attacked by a
shark at Sewells point, near Palm
Beach. He was assisting some fisher
men In hauling In a fishing net, when
a large shark was found entangled in
the meshes.
Hanscom jumped Into the net and
attempted to take the monster alire.
In the struggle which followed the
sliarjc seized Hanscom's right leg and
severely mangled It.
Hanscom was rushed to the hospital
in an automobile by a party of tour
ists passing at the time. Ills lacerated
leg was amputated, but he died a short
time afterward from loss of blood.
This Is the first known Instance
where any one has been attacked by
sharks along this portion of the east
coast, and even then the shark was
drawn Into the net beyond the bath
ing limits off the beach.
CELLULOID ON WOUNDS.
English Use Thin Perforatsd Layers In
Place of Lint.
London. Opinion among surgeons
and nurses Is practically unanimous In
favor of the advantages of a new
method of dressing large and painful
wounds, wherein a thin layer of per
forated celluloid Is substituted for lint
as the first covering for the raw wound.
The plan was tried successfully first
by Sir Allmotli Wright at St Mary's
hospital, Paddlngton, and now prom
ises to become generally adopted.
The celluloid, first rendered soft and
pliable by being soaked In a 20 per
cent solution of carbolic acid and then
washed In a weak salt solution. Is lahl
on the raw wound, the perforations
being so numerous that It seems most
ly holes. Fine lint soaked In a 6 per
cent solution of common salt In sterile
water Is then placed over the celluloid,
after which firm bandage« are applied.
Owing to the celluloid, much firmer
pressure can be used than with ordl
nary
X-RAY VICTIM DECORATED.
On Menard, Who Leet Twe Fingen.
QMs Leg ten ef Hewer.
Paris.—Dr. Menard of the Cochin
Turkeys, live, fat 16c per pound
Hens, heavy
Hens, light
asza
795
Model 8S-4 f.o.b. Toledo
(torn each hand, baa accomplished ad
mirable reeulta In the location of pro
jective In the bodies of wounded sol
dters.. The loss of his first linger did
not deter Dr. Menard from following
up his research work In the radio
graphic room. In the low of his linger
he learned that tissue cells exposed to
the action of the X-ray are subjected
to localized disease of nutrition and
consequence harden and rapidly
Through Dr. Menard's experiments
at the Cochin hospital a surgeon there
was able a few days ago to locate and
estract a shrspael bullet lodged under
%|Hnri wounded soldlsr la tea
Isitol
a%'V^y°','i^**'|'w*''f^'''r
More power—35 horsepower motor.
More room—112-inch wheelbase.
Greater comfort long, 48-inch cantilever
rear springs and 4-inch tires.
Greater convenience—electrical control but
tons on steering column.
Bigger, safer brakes—service, 13^x2^ emer
gency, 13x2^.
Better cooling—you never heard of an Over
land motor overheating.
Cash for Your Poultry!
Cash for Your Poultry!
We quote the following prices for this week and next week:
tt
a
1 1
it
it
10c
tt it
8
Ducks
Geese
Old Roosters
Hides
Skunks $1.25 to $2.50
We have opened this cash produce market at Sisseton, and we
will be in the market every day in the week to buy the above com
modities.
Remember we will be in the market to buy fur as soon as the
fur season open up.
We would advise the farmers not to sell their turkeys until they
get fat, as we are looking for a higher turkey market in December,
than we have at present.
When in Sisseton come in and see us, in the Tower Building,
opposite the Sisseton Standard office.
BENSON PRODUCE CO.,
Arnold Leuthgard, Local Manager
These Tremendous Advantage!
ÄSK .-S
J. J. AKRE, DEALER, SISSETON, S. D.
The WMys-OrecUnd Company, Toledo, Ohio
»la U.S.A."
RAFFLES GETS $2,000 JEWELS
Holds Up Family Three Hours Wait
ing Per His Loot.
New York.—A soft spoken, well dress
ed, nice appearing young man, with
silk handerchlef mask, robbed Mrs. Eu
gene Bennett In the Bronx of $2,000
worth of diamond rings and $20 In
money after waiting three hours for
her to return from the theater.
During the wait he drank eome of
Mr. Bennett's best whisky, smoked sev
eral cigarettes, never forgetting to keep
Mr. aad Mrs. Hiomas Hoffmlre, who
wate staying with the young Bennett
"JlK'nr «aerated with his revolver as
9c per pound
9c
7c
41 44
44
4 44
18c
Muskrats 15c to 35c
795
Model 85-4 f.«. b. Toledo
These are tremendous advantages over any
thing to be had in other cars that sell for
anywhere near as low a price.
And they make it hard for us to keep up with
orders.
The factory has never yet caught up with the
demand.
You ought to own one- these cars—nothing
else so big and fine for the money.
Come in and order yours now.
they lay In bed.
When Mrs. Bennett Anally came home
with her mother, Mrs. P. J. Sweeney,
the visitor worked so quietly In the
bedroom with Mrs. Bennett that Mrs.
Sweeney, In.the next room, did not
know about It until he slammed the
front door. Mr. Bennett le proprietor
of a restaurant
Pardoned te Join MilMle.
Little Bock, Ark.—Governor George
W. Hays pardoned* Albert James
condition that he Join the Arkansas
national guard. James had served part
of a two years' sentence. The gov
ernor said the girl's father had asked
hta te paeden Jaews If he would an-
1
ML J. FJERESTAD
Chiropractor
OfBce over *ed Crow Drug Store
254
Sisseton, S. D.
Eye Specialist Office in Swed"
land Bdg.

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