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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, January 12, 1917, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1917-01-12/ed-1/seq-6/

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IN EVERY
DROP**
Black Silk Stove Polish
Is Afferent. It docs not 1
dry out can be UMX) to the I
IM drop liquid and paste I
quality absolutely no I
.* no duet or dirt. You 1
UM your money'« worth. I
Black Silk
Stove Polish
is Ml only most economical, bot ft givua brilli
set, dlkylustre that cannot be obtained with any
ether bolish. Black Bilk Stove Polish do«* not
rob off— It laata lour time* a* long as ordinary
poUeb—so saves yoo time, work and money.
Don't loreei—when yoo
want atove polish, be sore to
ask for Bleck Silk. Ifitian't
the beet
stove polish yoo ever
used—your detier
will refund
your money.
Black
S3lc
Stove Polish
Works, Stcrlieg, Dlieeis.
Use Rlacfc Silk Air Dryia*
Iron Enemel on grate*, reg
isters, stove-pipes,and auto
mobile tire rims. Prevents
rusting. Try it.
Use Black Silk Metal Pol
leb for silver* are, nickel,
tin­
ware or hr»M. It works
quickly, eaily and leaven a
linlliHnt surface. It has no
iiiuiil foruwjon automobiles.
Get a Can TODAY
LadhsShampeoing
at the
Sariji iiy Biiber Shop
Every Day or Evening
ex. Fridav and atv.rdav
FOR
Strand's Dray Line
Phone 282
flusHEsiasraii
SftANO
"'•«•hl fof CTI-Cma-TI«a
»BAND PILL»
,1
I
ee .»»
mcuilic buxei, sealed"wKi* Blui
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS
EVERYWHERE,™™
Cleaning
and
Pressing
We make old suits look like
new ones And we are eq
uipped to do all kinds of
repair work, cleaning and
pressing exceptional
short time and a astonish
ingly low prices.
Let us tell you how little it
will cost you to put those
old clothes in good condit
ion before you decide to
thraw them away.
Why not keep one suit here
so that you can drop in any
time and always have a
suit that's nicely cleaned
and pressed and ready to
wear.
DQIID& OLSON
Catarrh means inflammation.
Inflammation is tbe stagnation
of blood—the «drein« of die
blood.
w« under
Iterona srr,
clroshtlon, lwl|onlMihe
SAVING OF LIMBS
American Surgeon's Fluid Avoids
Hundreds of Amputations.
CALL BENEFITS WONDERFUL.
Many More Could Have Been Saved
Had Value Been Felt Earlier—Young
South American Surgeon First to At
tract Attention of French Govern­
ment to Carrel Treatment.
Purin. The official letLmrgy which
for
SO IOIIR has IW[unlet] the develop
ment of the dLsiufevtuut tiuitl invented
by U. I). Dakin and p?rfecnx3 by Dr
Alexis Carrel. both of the Rockefeller
institute of New York, is rabidly giving
way to a realization of the trvmvndouF
benefits accruing from its use.
It rernaineil for a yutmg SouV) Amer
icaa surgeozi, Dr. Shutro. to attract the
attention of the French sroverunient tu
.,'4
M. AIJBXLH CAiUlO.
tk Cartel treatment. Aa a result ef
an appeal by American admirers of
Dr. Carrel to M. Franklin-Bouillon, the
latter persuaded the government. In
tile person of M. Palnleve, to study at
Bret hand the use of the Da kin fluid.
The correspondent was present when
the minister of public instruction, who
was the first member of the cabinet to
take such a step, visile,! the Buffon
hospital, close by the Pasteur Institute,
to see for himself the miracles worked
by Dr. Shutro with the treatment de
veloped by Dr. Carrol. Dr. Shutro Is
perhaps the ablest of Dr. Carrel's few
disciples In France.
M. Palnleve was. astonished at the
almpllcity of the ay stem, which Is mere
ly the washing of the wounds with
bleaching lime diluted In water, with a
percentage of soda added to neutralize
the caustic effect of the lime. At the
foot of each bedstead In tbe Buffon
hospital Is strapiied a wooden poet, to
Which bottle containing the fluid, pink
In color, to attached. From the bottle
thin rubber tube carries the, solution
to four small glass tubes, from which
the wound Is flushed every two hours.
Thus the dressings are kept moist end
tbe wound Is freed from Infection.
WOULD EGG HENS ON TO LAY
Feed tysniat Has Plan te Centre!
Their Output.
Washington.—Out of the din and
clamor for federal legislation to deal a
eolar plexus blow to the high cost of liv
ing ceme a unique and eugenic sugges
tion from southern reresentatlve.
The legislator announced hie Inten
tion of Introducing a resolution for
compulsory egg control for hens. He
expressed belief that It might he easy
to curb output, but was perplexed as
to the practicability of speeding up the
lay to any appreciable extent.
He says, however, be believes his
plan makes the matter of Investigation
pale Into iuslgnlflcance.
Paye Per Fan Stolen veara agt.
Greenville, 8. C.—A woman who Is
seeking to "make peace with her Mak
er," as she expresses It, and who finds
that something to hindering her has
sent to a local dry goods company 25
cents to pay for I fan which, she says,
she took frorik that company twenty
five yean ago. The woman now lives
in North Carolina. In the letter she
stated that she stole the fan and that
her conscience
haa
hurther.
SLANG IS NECESSARY,
SAY CHICAGO'S CO-EDS.
They'll Sling It For All They're Worth,
but Only Highbrow Variety.
Vhlvugo.—Slang, if it Is of the huh
brow variety, will still IK* in vogue
uniong the vo-eds at Northwestern uni.
verity and the University of Vhivagv.
And this despite the annuutueinem
that the women of Vassar have put
the "kiuvsh" .n it
4n
it»:
Lastern girls are ut:h. ou airs, siu
tbe Chicago oo-eds. who uiviarv thev
intend to sling sung for ah they art
worth. but :!yt r.f course, the rvöutx'.
and cultural kind.
"Highbrow slang is not like the low
vulgar kind." deviarxxl MI*A Norma VUJ
loii at Ni-rthxvestern uuh ersity. "1t
just expres-sive. and. well—it just make»,
one perfectly first. Yes. erfectly first
is cultured slang, and its a ripping
phntsv.'
"We'vv got to use slang." pleadtxl
MLs Mabel McConneil. also of the
Nonhwvstem. "If we didn't we would
not I aMe to understand the men."
Almost the same arguments were of
fered by the girls nt the University of
Chicago, win-re "she.:." moaninc "be
gin speaking," "hit tbe tub* and "beat
it'' are not only permissible but nee
ess )ry ex]«ressions.
"Rut vulgnr siring won't be tolerat
»MV said Mis Helen Lirtdsav of i.»rtv:I
wwd hail. "When I hear girls usmc
it I always bawl them out/'
NEW TYPE OF MINE
TO PROTECT CMSTS
Antilles Perfects an Improved
Device Which Rises and
Falls With the Tide.
.New Xork.—A licw typt- of suUma
riiie mini' which has recently beeu per
fected b.v tie coast artillery brauch 01
the United States army and which will
be Issued to forts guarding American
harbors as soon as possible was de
scribed by officers who have beeu fol
lowing tests of the mine. All are en
thusiastic over the possibilities which
the new weapon affords of simplifying
and making more effective the nation's
coast defenses.
While the mechanism of the mine Is
a secret. It Is known that Its effective
ness lies In the fact that the depth of
the tide and tbe strength of the cur
rent In a harbor may be entirely dis
regarded when the mine Is planted.
An automatic device Inside tbe mine
Itself can be set for any desired sub
mergence, which will keep the mine at
that place (usually eight feet below the
surface) no matter how the tide may
rise and fall and in spite of any dray
by the current
This type of mine can be planted in
a harbor and then left alone on the
bottom, controlled by the operator at
the mine field switchboard In the fori.
To this switchboard every Individual
mine In the field Is connected by a ca
ble. From his post the operator can
send tlie mine on a moment's notice to
Its war position Just below the sur
face, lle can tell how far up It has
gone by a small signal device In the
casemate, a gong, which sounds a
ringing note for every foot upward
the hidden destroyer travels.
MOTHER SHOT KISSING SON.
Revolver Is Dleeharged as She Steals
Up Behind Him—Youth Surrendsrs.
Mllford, Conn.—Clarence Kehlenbeck,
twenty-one years old, was cleaning a
revolver In his room when his mother,
Mrs. M. Kelifenbeck, stole up behind
him to give him a good night kiss. As
her arms encircled his neck the revolv
er was discharged, the bullet entering
her abdomen.
Her son took her by automobile to
St Vincent's hospital, Bridgeport, and
after learning that she had a chance
for recovery, hastened back to Mllford,
where he gave himself up to the police.
NO NOBEL PEACE PRIZE.
Committee Refuese te Make Awards
Per WIS and 191«.
London.—Reuter's Chrlstlanla corre
spondent says the Nobel committee has
decided by 28 votes to 11 not to dis
tribute the Nobel peace prize for 1915
and 1016.
The Nobel peace prize has not been
awarded since 1918. when it was given
to Henri La Fontaine, a Belgian sena
tor, who Is president of the Permanent
International Peace Bureau at Berne.
Switzerland. The prize for the pre
vious year was awarded to E'lhu Root
..f New York.
STANDARD TIME FOR
SALONIKI PROVIDEO
ITalhoad O Iraater at Sli
Aurora, III.—The youngest railroad .Constantinople
dlrsctor In tbe world lives in Aurors. differed from all the others In be
The illatlaialshad youngster la Henry ing based on the course of the
•«Ma, alztaan years old. He moon. There are still three dlf
«aa «C tha ftox and nilaoia Cerent Sabbatha a week—Friday 4
Q»ka reBwad hofcrd at the laat Cor Moslems, Saturday for Jews
THE SlSSKTt N WFKKM St AM'Aim
DARING AIR FEATS
Late Captain Boclkc's Stories of
Battles In Sky.
PILOT DEAD. AERO FLEW ON.
Slain Enemy Aviator Held In Place by
Rubber Band». S.iy Famous Flier's
Reporte—With He-:m Shot Away One
Airman Seated Himself on the Wing
of His Machine.
Berlin.—Keplete th dramatic inci
dents and intvzvM.ng features are the
reports just publishtsl of the late Cn\
tain Hoelke. the famous (lennaii a vi
a tor. »bnmght down forty-two hos
tile *ei\ ptnnes durihg the serx ice whirii
endtxl with his death on Oct. 20 last.
The Overseas News :i~ency. summary,
ing the n^ports. s:.x th loelke told
of a sevisz'ii.iv.rtl ir« ident in an ei.coun
ter with a h.-siile r.er.v hnie ou one of
the last his rfiU's, on O t. S.
"I wundertxl the stubbornness of
ihe enemy.** wrote $ he aviator, "con-
A.
THE LATE CAPTAIN HOELKK
Sideling that he must have been fin
ished a long time ago. but he continued
to circle in the same fashion.
"Ileason told me the man must be
dead and that the machine was being
maintained In its right position only
b.v the rubber bands at the helm
Therefore 1 approached closely and
saw the occupant of the machine lean
ing toward the right side, dead.
"The airplane bore the number 7,495.
The horrible picture left me unshaken
I let the man alone and attacked the
next one."
An example of chivalry reported In
Boelke"s book Is to the effect that aft
er having encountered an adversary
Boelke made several "rounds of hon
or" over the place where his enemx
had fallen. A "round of honor" among
aviators is a mark of courtesy to a
fallen brave enemy. Boelke himself
decorated the place where the enemy
aviator bad been buried with a bunch
of red, white and blue flowers.
One of Boellie's most remarkable
qualities was Iiis respect for an ene
my, and he repeatedly used phrases
like the following: "A British aviator
really flew home at a height of 100
yards above our trenches. He was a
smart chap. That Is not likely to be
done by another."
Many times hostile machines made
seemingly incredible efforts to escape
the much feared German aviator, the
hostile air man apparently desiring at
least to save his own life, the reports
Indicate. On March 4. 1910, Boelke re
ported:
"Again I approached the enemy, who
had already been violently tired upon.
Then I saw something most peculiar.
The observer had climbed upon the left
whig of the machine and was clinging
to the supports. He looked at me aa If
quite terrified and waved his band. I
bad shot away a piece of the helm,
and the machine had pitched down
ward. To get It in balance again the
observer had see ted himself on the
wing."
MUST MARRY AGAIN.
West Virginia snd Ohio Couples Die
cover Weddlnge Were Illegal.
Wheeling, W. Va.—Hundreds of mar
ried couples In this city and In cities
across the river In Ohio were shocked
by a report that federal agents are In
vestigating marriages by Ohio minis
ters of couples having licenses issued
here and in other West Virginia cities.
The marriages of many couples who
were wed In this manner have been de
elared illegal. A number of ministers
in Ohio cities have secured licenses In
county courts in this state to iierform
the marriage ceremony, and while this
license permits them to marry couples
having West Virginia licenses In this
state, It does not permit them to marry
holders of West Virginia licenses In
Ohio.
-i
Saloniki—If the allies have
done nothing else at Saloniki
they have at least enabled every
one to know the right time.
Hitherto one railway worked to
Vienna time, another to Con
stantlnople time. Saloniki bed
Its own local time and there was
alio Turkish time other than the
variety, which
The frequency of these marriages
caused an Investigation. Scores of cou
ples thus married are planning to he
remarried.
Rigid Man Pussies Doctors.
Oakland, Cat. Physicians at the
emergency hospital were pussled over
the aliment of a man who was found
by the Alameda polk* recently stand
ing on the sUeet In complete state of
1
wmtttg, Hh Wtark seuetsry and and Sunday for the Christians. blinking eyes. UM police sent the man
timmmt ft*
rigidity, with the exception of a pair at
te the nmirg-iT hospital. He steed
ail alaht
SEES LOST HUSBAND
IN NEWSPAPER PHOTO.
Bringe Ray of Hope to Mrs. Lucy Zad*
ler. Polish Refugee.
Albany.—There was a ray of hope in
this Yuletide for Mrs. Luey A. Zad
ler. a comely Polish woman of thirty,
that she may lind her husband in some
of the armies or prison amps in Ku
rope, lie was taken from her more
than two years ago. and she has heard
no tidings of him since. The ray of
hope was brought about by the lllus
trated supplement of a Sunday news
paper. Mrs. Zadler's employer, know
ing her hatred of the tiermans and
Austrian*, tossed the supplement to
her with the remark. "There are some
Austrians for you." AH her eyes fell
upon the picture she screamed and
nearly collapsed. Then she pointed to
a picture of some soldiers and ex
claimed: "That's him! That's Joseph.
W8MEN LAWYERS TOO
KINO FOR
I
my husband!"
Iter Journey to this country fmm her
home in Lubllc, Poland, she says, is
like a dream and is still hazy in her
mind. When the war brokv out her,
husband, who had saved a little money,
decided to come to America and live in
peace. He purchased railroad tickets
to Hotterdam and steamer tickets to
New York. They had proceeded on
their way for some distance when at
a railroad station. Mrs. Zadler says,
some soldiers took her husband in cus
tody, telling her to proceed on her jour
ney and that he would meet her at the
ship. Where the station was or its
name she has not the slightest idea.
Neither could she say what was the
nationality of the soldiers who kidnap
ed her husband.
BIG
FEES
They Can Make a Hit, However,
by the Free Defense of
Criminals.
Chicago.—Pretty women lawyers by
the score met in the rooms of the
Brownlelgh club to hear Clarence Har
row encourage them In their profes
sion. but when be got through they
were much discouraged.
"You can't be shining lights at the
bar." said Mr. Darrow, "because you
are too kind.
"You emi never be cor|oratlon law
yers, because you are not cold blood
ed. You have not a high grade of in
tellect.
"You can never expect to get the
fees that men get. I doubt if you ever
make a living.
"Of course you can lie divorce law
yers. That is a useful field. And there
Is another field that you can have sole
ly for your own. You won't make a
living at it. but It's worth while, and
you'll have no competition. That is
the free defense of criminals."
HURT MAKING WOODEN LEG.
Cuts Artery In Arm While Whittling
Artificial Limb.
Cumberland, Md.—John W. Dean, a
legless man, barely escaped bleeding to
death a few days ago from having cut
an artery in Ms arm while working on
an artificial leg. lie was whittling out
the opening, which fits tightly, when
the knife clipped. There was no one
near at the time and Dean lost blood
rapidly. He became so weak he could
not utter a cry.
His sister, who was :ibs :l fnin Iii»
house, returned and nu.:mio:ivcl I -r.
George P. Paulman, who stopped the
flow of blood. Dean lost both legs in
fall from a freight car while In the em
ploy of the Western Maryland railway.
CELL COSTS $2.45 NIGHTLY.
No More Free Polles Ledginge In Bal
timore After Jan. 1.
Baltimore.—The high cost of living
lies struck the western police station,
and after tbe first of the year men ar
rested more for safe keeping than for
punishment will not get their lodgings
free. Tbe announcement was made by
Magistrate .Tobannsen while hearing
the case of Charles McCauley on a
charge of being drunk.
"I warn you that the rates have gone
up because ?f the high cost of living."
said the magistrate. "Police stations
cannot afford to put you up. and after
Jan. 1 the rate will be #2.45 a night.
That does not Include a bath, unless
the guest's condition requires It"
BUFFALO HERDS INCREASING.
Number ef Animals on Government
Reservation Grows.
Washington—The buffalo, once threat
ened with extinction. Is Increasing in
numbers on government reservations,
according to the annual report of the
biological survey. Five big game pre
serves- and sixty-seven bird reserva
tions are maintained by the survey.
The report urges that more tracts of
land not suitable for agricultural pur
poses be converted into breeding
grounds for birds. Many thousand
acres of marsh land. It declares, could
be turned easily into breeding grounds
for wsterfowl.
May Inherit $1*000,000.
San Francisco.—If Sally Nickel, the
one-year-old great-grandchild of Henry
Miller, shall be alive at the death of
the late cattle king's three grandchil
dren ehe will become the richest wom
an In California. She will inherit aa
aetata valued at S15.000.000.
tmt tooo juottt riuos
GENUINE
THE
Yofficers
MILLER &
omni»
YOU MAWT HY WORD»
ANY HAN TAKING A BIGGER
CHEW OF WB CUT TOBACCO
THAN THAT, ISA TOBACCO
GLUTTON AND WE DON'T
WANT GLUTTONS ON THE
FORCE-
KWW»
auo.tr roaacco.l
YOU'RE «IOHT Slftl
»eve*AL or OUR HEN I
USE W-B BECAUSE I
RICH TOBACCO AND
SMALL CHEW SATISFIES.1
OU notice a fine regard for appearance among the
from Roundsmen to Captain—that's one
reason they are so keen for W-B CUT Chewing.
The pass-word among these gentlemanly fellows is "If
you won't take a little chew don't take any." No need
to disfigure the face, when a nibble of rich tobacco gives
more satisfaction than a wad of ordinary stuff—also less
grinding and spitting. Take a tip from the officer on W-B.
Dress and Work Shoes for Men, Wo
men and Children.
Up to date Repair Shop in connection.
SISSETON, SOUTH DAKOTA.
The Standard Office is Equipped
to do Your PiMns ue Way You
Want It Done
Children Cry lor Fletcher'«
The Kind Ton Have Always Bought, and which has been
In sss for ever ewer 30 years, has borne the signature of
and has been made under his per*
LEAVE IY TO THTL
POLICE OFFICE*?!
TO PINO OUT
ABOUT QUALITY!
TOBACCO,
FCY WEYMAN-BRUTOH COMPANY, SO Unioa Squirt, New York City
REAL SERVICE
TIIIMC are m:m\ little tricks etn
|)lo\ eil hv Hood tnviit buyers in
judyiiiK c]u:iIitv. And we tire
erlvvi ly willing to Mi are our
•jM-orets with mi
We Imv only tin' best, Imt we
\v:mt oil tn ktuiw ri^h: at the
mie of nur pnrcha'e that yon
nett inn what on want,
A ml out price- me right, too.
SISSETON, S. D.
JOHN M. SWANBERG.
Dealer in
W"1 "pervisioa since its infancy.
'TrTt"''t Allow no one to deceive you in this.
All Counterfeits, Imitations and Just-as-good» are but
Experiments that trifle with and endanger the health of
Infants and Children—Experience against Experiment.
What is CASTOR IA
Castoria is a harmless substitute tor Castor Oil, Paregoric,
Drops and Soothing Syrups. It is pleasant. It contains
neither Opium, Morphins nor other narcotic substance. Its
age is its guarantee. For more than thirty years it has
been in constsnt use for the relief of Constipation, Flatulency,
Wind Colic and Diarrhoea allaying Feverishness arising
therefrom, and by regulating the Stomach and Bowels, aids
the assimilation of Food giving healthy and natural
The Children's Panacea—The Mother's Friend.
CASTORIA
I Bears the Signature of
In Use For Over 36 Years
Kind You Wave? Afw
•MC «N-vr.v r: ..t^Ae'Ar.'v
V-
1
ALWAYS

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