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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, November 05, 1920, Image 4

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1920-11-05/ed-1/seq-4/

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State News
SNOW 1"II 1111 I iS
Doadwood—A ivfvnt. sii'.iwf:!!
throughout Hip Black Hill.s will
make t-ondit .mis nlt-al l'nr the open­
ing 01' the di-cr season on Nov.l.
Tlit hhow will inn lit' rncl ini of the
allium easy and will add to I lie
Kport of deer hunting.
itKconn
L.-tUr Nurdi-ti. C'hristoj)hors:iii
ila.lseti, win) resides suulheast uf
this city, staios that he ha- raised a
record corn crop this year. lie
l.f.oo bushels from :'«fi acres of corn.
This averages a little over htish
•lh to the acre. '1 !:.• ordinary aver
age in this district for this year w•
1!
j^p atiout to 40 bushels per acre.
•y*: 15\ ANYY CHOWS
'Howard.—The marksmen
Howard and Miner counties made a
sood record in killing crows during
the annual county crow hunt, which
waj rstagod this week. The contesi
autt were divided into teams, and
the team killing the fewest crows
tendered the winning team a ban-
quol.
Blair was arrested oil the speci
fic charge of having obtained nion--y
under false pretenses. Me broug'at
the Joe Song cafeteria in Aberdeen,
giving in pavmcnt therefor a check
and a mortgage for S2.n0f: on a deal
Involving a total of $-1.(100, For
these he was given possession of the
restaurant, and while loitering in
Aberdeen trying to dispose of
place for a cash sum before
worthless check came back he
arrested and his bubble burst.
TVs'
el
"Hlt.'ll imow" SW IMMiKU, si:v
TKN' 111) -TO "I'KV" IS MKM
ItKIt OI' \T!\i
Aberdeen —(Justave Blair, one .!'
a Kant of "highbrow" swindler
who operated extensively in South
IVakota ami other no li
western
states durum several months of til's
year, was hoi lie tried in the Brown
county circuit court when he sud
denly brought the trial to a termi
nation by the announcement that
ho wished to enter a p'.ea of guilty.
A short time later ltlair was sen
tenced bv Judge Anderson to a term
of three years in (lie state peniten
tiary. In imposing sentence Judg"
Anderson stated that he regretted
that the la-.v did not permi the in
fliction of a heavier p"iialty—that
he would have liked to have made
the sentence In years instead of
three. ....
I.e.'ider of Swindlers
The pica of guilty on the part of
the defendant was a sensational end
to t'i-3 court career or or.e who is.
be'ieved to have been one. of the
leaders in tlto series of swindling
operations on a larsre scale by which
unsuspecting residents of the north
west have been svindled out oC
thousands of dollars.
1
ho
was
Ilatl Cont'ed'Tatcs'
While lie was operating on
deal his son. It. M. Blair, and a
third confederate. Andrew Mille'-,
dabbled in farm laud purchases and
then purchased two automobiles
with worthless checks from Aber
deen dealers and (led the country
Neither has yet been captured.
(ll
Between them something like
$20,000 in fraudulent checks wer"
issued within the course of a week.
First of all they purchased the
H. Neiger farm, paying $G,000 down I
with a worthless check and taking
a contract for purchase. Armed
with this showing that they had
swung a $17,000 deal these "Iowa
capitalists." as they represented K^'i "on"head
themselves to be, made progress.
They went to two different sour
ces, making the same story fit both
places that they were buying a lot
of Hrown county farm land, and
gave as evidence the contract for the
checks were regarded as good, and
l' they gave them in exchange for two
autoiiiuhik's.
I'urohnso l''aini«
N'ear ('resbard they purchase!) tli"
Caliler farm, giving a cheek for .*1.
n(it as the (irst payment on the pur
chase price. They later made r.
trade with one of tile llrooks boys
for some farm land in Xoi I li l)a ko
la which is proved they i.ever own
ed. All of these deals fell of their
own false structure except the pur
chase of tile two automobiles. Mil
ler and tlie younger lllair enleivd
the automobiles and drove a\'.a\
and the authorities aru.uAi'r tliein
Tl'e' "lots" which w.-re bein^r
railed in as pari. of the deal with
.loo Souk were lepreseted to have
been worth i.01i• In proof of thi
Oustave l'Uair showed where he bad
just sold them to a man nairn-d
Andrew Miller for that amount. Of
course, it was a fake deal and a fic
titious price. They were represent
ed to be two lots situated in a inid
wav district between Seattle and
Tacoma. ai'd lo have a garage pen
them, facing a main highway.
1 Lot are Wort lilc-ss
I When attorneys in the case came
to investigate them it was discover
ed that the lots were assessed at $s
instead of being worth $4,0u(l. There
was no garage upon them, and in
fact, they could not be approached
even by an army truck on account
of a narrow path across the sloug'i
being the only way lo get to the in
cline they occupied.
The $-1,(1011 "lots" have a 1 per
cent grade, covered with second
growth til", timber and elder brush
and huge stumps of a huriied-off
area that made the land useless,
Th" Brown county authorities
are very hopeful of yet capturing
Miiler and the younger Blair, and
ill this effort a countrywide search
is being made for the lii: uvts.
Millet l,e. Heat \haiim ion
I'l-ei/ing
Sunstroke and heaf exliau tiotl
are both caused, generally speaking,
from til
0
same source, i. e.. excessive
hot weather, although the former
lis usualy producd by the direct
rays of the snn striking the litad.
while the latter is more apt to com,
from humid weather or as a result
of being contiiu to poorly venti'a
I ted work shops or rooms.
The remarkable thing about
these very serious emergencies is.
this. that...while both arise from a
common cause, yet in each case the
symptoms are so diversely opyo
sitc. as are aUv.) the treatment, that
it. will be well to impress the
points by means of a comparative
table and thereby facilitate one's
decision as lo which is which, and
also enable one to do the correct
thing, for v.-e must bo sure, in these
Miiite common emergencies since
they are of an exceedingly serious
nature. 1.90 1 deaths occurred last
year from tliif cause directly and of
Ihe 02.-1" 1 deaths reported from
apoplexy (there is a form of this di
sease which is termed "heat, apo
plexy) there were doubtless manv
of those death was the result of til's
condition, due to humid or hot
weather.
Stinsl roke—
Weakness—tired feeling
Throbbing headache, .ifi
Sense of oppression.
Flushed face.
Skin very hot and dry.
Croat fever (104 degrees or
higher)
Breathing shallow or lond
like snoring.
Pulse quick and bounding.
'ill' ti
sn
es
s.
Meat Maustion—
Weakness—tired feeling.
Hull headache.
Croat depression.
Pale face.
Skin clammy and cold.
Temperature of body low.
Breathing feeble.
'Pulse weak.
Seldom unconscious. ..
Sunstroke—
1. Oct quickly into shade.
J. Remove tight clothing and
strip to waist.
.'1. Dash cold water on face ard
first farm they also stated they had T' noVo^Sy^colT appl'ica
sonie certificates of deposits which turns under any circumstances.
would soon be due and asked if a f- Patient, lying Mat, bead low.
check would be satisfactory The:- .Ar(l!ll:l|ic spirits of ammonia
water in sips. Hot tea or coffee.
M'CKIE, THE PRINTER'S Dti/l
A piscjE POT \vi -rue.
AQOOT KAN WfeVAAtVW WHO OvtP OUT
DAKOTA. tA'ST'SWAVMfi
TUEN
SEViT \T
TO KA6
a
4. Keep patient in recumbent
position—head raised.
". When conscious, give lots of
cold water to drink, or ice to suck.
Heat Ehaustiou—
1. Cet into quiet place.
2. T.oosen tight clothing and
SISSETON
WEEKLY
ressing conni-
Both of these (list
tions may be prevented by taking
care not over do during hot
weather, and in case of not becom
ing tired, especially dizzy, followed
by headache or sense of oppression,
these being the warnings of ap
proaching trouble. Then at oio-e
stop working, take a cool bath, or
b:.i'ie the head, face and band-: in
cold water, lie down in shady or airy
place, and rest, quietly for an hour
or two. DON'T PKK.MIT I'SH OK
Al.t'OIIOi. IN ANY FOUll!
Frost lute need hardly be describ
er since it is a common afilictioi' in
Northern Division territory. If.any
thing be emphasized in this connec
tion. it is prevention. Proper caie
should be taken to avoid un11• ces
snry exposure of face, ears and
hands, taking particular care of ihe
feet.
If one is frost
to restore affected
with snow, or, in
ice scrapings or
hands or ieet can
cold water and
while in water, and
parts is restored,
bitten, end: a vm'
parts by rubbing
absence of snow,
ice water. The
lie submerged in
friciion applied
the color iif
tern pel a lire
of water gradually
condition obtains,
rub on vaseline, or
fine, or carbolic sa
absorbent cotton,
formed, prick with
Care will have lo In
until normal
Dry parts and
lard and turpe i
Ive and wrap in
If blisters had
a sterile needle.
taken for .-onv."
ty pr f, ..-i.r.N
Li Lad: fc.:
GOSM* -CVW^&V\ VAfctS fVT WW-U TNV.E.
COL-UVAW UMJF A\WFOU \-OVia— OUMWO
WEU-,WWM MOT?
OOViT
•rut
STANDARD
O'Connor's Early Lead
(Continued from Page 1)
town. Valley City also shows'proportionate gains since
the primary. These gains are accounted for by the fact
that lab.tr stood almost 100 per cent behind the farmers'
organization in the campaign.
Not enough returns were at hand last night on which
to base an estimate on the vote on the initiated measures.
A few scattered returns received at the League headquar
ters indicate that the vote on these measures in the rural
districts was nearly the same as that for governor.
League officials expressed the belief that the measures
had been defeated, but 1. V. A. headquarters claimed their
adoption by a substantia! majority.
While making the claims that these initiated meas
ures had been approved by the voters, these I. V. A. offi
cials contended that Governor Frazier's majority is not
over 5,000. League campa'tcn managers declared that if
Go\ ernor Frazier's majority is 15,000 the measures have
be-.^n rejected by the voters and every Le
elected.
time following to prevent reoccur
rence of frost bite.
Caution—Never take a person in
to a warm room who is suffering
frost bite. First restore parts.
Heat will cause gangrene.
Perhaps There Was Ueason
•An editor received Ibis letter from
a fresh youth:
"Kindly tell me why a girl al­
Send us your duplii-Jita
sample key. We can
make most any kind: our
prices are from 2fc up.
Schindier Bros.
Sissetcn. So. Dak
I
•^^veinoer
ft TN
J- will sell at public auction on the F. E. Parker
farm, 1 mile south and 6 miles west of Sisseton
the following described property to-wit:
1 bay mare 10 years old, wt. 1200 black mare
4 years old, wt. 1200 black gelding 3 years old,
wt.1100 black cow, 5 years old 2 cows red and
white in color, 5 years old white cow 3 years
old blue cow, 3 years old red cow, 3 years old
black heifer coming fresh, 1 steer 3 yrs. old, 1
steer 18 months old, 4 heifer calves. 50 chick
ens, Dane stacker, Meadow Queen bucker,
Minnesota mower, one Deering rake,
John Deere plow, low lift John Deere corn
plow, two horse new 26ft. harrow, United
States separator, binder bobsled.
TERMS: One years time at usual rate of in-'
terest on sums over $10.
Everything must be settled for before remov
ing from premises.
Free lunch will be served at noon.
Sale starts promptly at 1:00 o'clock, p. m.,
J. 0. PARKER,
Col. W. S. Rath, Auctioneer N. C. Klein, clerk
iixicmmnnimiiiimTiinnimiirmnninr/iiim^nruigjmiiiiua'-miagptjf-^rjrmmiDiiinznprTnmtTrpiirTanninii'i-T^TTTTT'nTTtmTTTiirti.iitiiJi.n
lv .h.o*k\s bu^hriK'
1
\X csicrn NiwspijTt t.'i
I
-jejune candidate
HCT.nLi' runns:mniasn?mjri'T!—- nnsLnj:.-
'•'4
NOPe,
nobocn
But FAt
r5r.faLyssm.
ways closes her eyes when a fellow
kisses her."
To which the editor replied:
"if you will send us your photo'-"
graph we may be able to tell you
the reason."— Puck.
*5*
*5* *5* *2* •J* *3* *5* *5" »t* *1* *3* *5* *2*
*2*
Wm.
Swedlund
A
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\iJCUU, YA&2&Z vr VKMU- VJOVCTU "VVA:
C\P EV£RHeOCN scow SA!£»e KViOVW SEti.
8
Insurance
Bonds
M» «3» «M»
«3* 4
«i» 8*
fi $
Yof
cialiy by United States
1
OO
Aoth:jritica.':
For weeks, for months, it
keeps as freih end full of
strenRth the chy it ft the
Calumet Faclitri.is, t!:o World's
Liiri c. t, mr« Sur.il ry and Moaoin
Baking Powdtr iji .nt.i.
HEATING
We have a uood slock of
various kinds of heating
stoves at very reasonable
priees. Why invest in
a new heater wlu-n you
ran buy a slightly us
one much cheaper and
receive ,just as yood serv
ice and ivsub. ('a 11 in
and look over my stock
before buvitij*
C. A. YEAGER
OU don't use as much
Calurr.et as you do
of
most other baking Powders.
It has niore than ordinary
leavening strength. You
save about half.
You don't pay a big price io
Calumet. It's sold at a
moderate price that rep
resents another saving.
You don't feel uncertain as
to results. Bakings never
The Second Hand Man
SISSETON, SO. DAK.
fail—because Calumet never i.-iU9
below the proven standard of "Best
by Teat."
iim i, m—••,iu
,(j-1 vji 'i
I IUI I! I III
r-!».
Ponnd can of Calumet contain"? full
16oz. b-.oinebakini n-%vderscomei 11
X2( z.inst.-iid ol JGpz.cijns. lJesnre jj|
you get a pound when yon want it.
IF YOU WANT BEST MEALS TO BE HAI)
IN THE CITY AND REAL SERVICE GO TO
PALACE CAFE
TOM LEE, Prop. Sisseton, S. D.
NEW TAILOR SHOP
Having bought tin Ivl a j. IiailU-v building, have start
ed a tailor shop. Will do repairing, cleaning, press
ing and alterations. Your patronage will he solicited.
IiENRY CAMPBELL, Tailor
L'EKVKK. SOUTH DAKOTA
i1
"'jlic qual­
ity ever put into a Bailing
jwc&r. Contain- only such
ingredients «':s Siave buer. ciii-
I
&<•**$
Vjti
k!
Ooto Cakd
Every Editor Knows This Bird
WAKit \t PUT
VC.\\s\ QJJS XX OOT
WBATWAGS TOO
'/j
Uccip'i
ic i'
Yo^-ts of 8 crrg,
l'l'-'ipscff. 1-
5 I «!-'tedsu^r
cup of water.
1
v-
jj of t.uvler,
I a .'"/j enns p:. *ry
ft fiour, 3 lev. 1
iS -ipOtillS ChIu.- t't
., Baking PowiU r,
I. 1 tablcsnoon of
vanilla. 'Then
TUX in the
l'egu
:j
lar way.
P! r« lur iv.
I

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