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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, December 31, 1920, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1920-12-31/ed-1/seq-6/

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!i» Mary Hoaton Vorse
fa the employment bureau of the
Amalgamated on East 10th St.,
groups of women gather every morn
ing. There are bare-headed women,
and smart, well dressed women,
vrtio look as if they had just step
ped off Fifth Avenue. In the same,
room Sicilian peasants meet and
talk with advanced workers of Tus
caa Decent.
tabor contests are lost and won
ia ouch little groups. Put a dozen
of them together and you have the
tenper of the people. It is not what
people shout for in big meetings
that always counts most, it's what
they Bay at home or among themsel
ves ia stack moments on gray, rainy
aioraings, waiting in the employ
meat bureau.
Out of the murmur and talk a
voice cuts with correding sharp
aesa:
''Children! I haven't any child-
Carl J. Rice
& Sons
880 Met. Bilk. Bldg., Minne
apolis, Minn.
Good Duplex (house for
two familiea) in pertect re
pair in a good district in
South Minneapolis bringing
$60.00 per month rental at
the bargain pricet of $3800.00.
Villa brings yon over 15 per
cflbt on yonr investment.
Oilier properties at equally
cod bargains.
Wf have a number of good
Mortgages Minneapolis
property as well as on good
Anna at 8 per cent Interest.
Farms bought and sold in
Roberts county and elsewhere.
mrnmmmmf
A Happy
New Year
The Employment Bureau
ren! Children break strikes. Th.j
workers' children make it easy for
the employers to (ramp us. The.
workers are afraid because tlu-y are
afraid for their children, book .it
our Sicilian women who have a baby
every year. How terrible a strike
is for them. Babies are scab makers
and strike breakers for a worker.
I'll not have babies to live wretch
ed like me! Let the rich people
have the children! Let the em
ployers' children do the work!"
The revolt in this woman was a
hot blue flame. It never went out.
It was a spirit like this that had
taken the factories in Italy. With
that example before her, what a
scorn she had for the American
workers.
"The people in this country lie
down for the bosses to walk on. My
husband he's Just come back from
Italy. The workers here make me
ashamed—when a policeman waves
a club at a crowd they run there
it takes fifty guards to capture thir
ty workers."
Three comely pleasant looking
girls were standing together and
she challenged them.
How's your shop standing? What
are you going to do?"
''We—we will do what the Union
says," they answered. They had no
initiative. They were not fighters.
They were good solid Union girls
though.
"Do what the Union says! If I
thought anyone should go back on
the Union in my shop—if I thought
that—but they won't."
A slender girl in black had been
sitting by herself. She was straight
as a lance with distinction in every
line of her. She joined us now.
"A strike is no new thing for me,"
she said. "We have been on strike
for 9 months in my shop." Then
she added as if it were an after
thought. "My husband is sick and
I am supporting him and my two
children."
"How do you make out?"
"Oh, I get odd Jobs here and
there. We have to go through such
things, you see, to hold what we
have won," she explained.
Behind her quiet there was an In
tensity of conviction that carried
further than emphasis. "Tou know
%i
what we use to make?" She ap
pealed to the bare-headed women
sitting by the wall. "Little by lit
tle they'll try to get us back to the
old wages. If we don't stand solid
now.
The three peasant women nodded.
"The union has made things bet
ter," they said gravely.
They sat against the wall in at
titudes of immemorial patience
Their faces were wrinkled and their
sad eyes looked ahead at nothing.
There was in them no revolt, only
the age-old acquiescence of the
down-trodden to things as they are.
The young girl with them was as
patient as the older women. Amer
ica had not touched her. She, like
the older ones, was bare-headed.
SISSETON WEEKLY STANDARD
THAT THE YEAR 1921
-re'
y, A
Shall be filled with health, happiness and
prosperity is our most sincere wish to our
many patrons and friends. We trust you
have appreciated our efforts during the past
year and that you will continue to be num
bered a member of our great family. We
appreciate most heartily the support we
have received the past year.
ROBERTS CO. PRESS, INC.
Fertilizer Is to Be Cheap Again
9K&E1.
Farmers who have been forced to pay exorbitant prices for for*
tillzer face relief. The Department of Agriculture has found a new
method of removing phosphoric acid from phosphate rock, which If
thought will revolutionise the world's fertilizer Industry. The net
process Is shown In the picture—dumping the phosphate rock In at
the top—It Is heated with coke and sand in the fuel-fed furnace-^
the acid coming out at the bottom front pipes, held by the man at
the left. There is no loss of rock by this process, whereas the «ld
screening method resulted In an 80 per cent loss.
She had a gentle and submissive
air, as of a woman who has never
asked herself disquieting questions
about life or its eternal injustice.
These are the women on whom
the lockout presses heaviest they're
most easily bullied, the most, de
fenseless. They knew little about
America. A civilization separated
them from the fiery woman from the
north who talked of Russia and
looked forward to an Italy that was
industrially free. But they knew
one thing and that was what the
Amalgamated had done for them.
It is meetings like this that the
Amalgamated spirit—in other words
Solidarity—shows itself. Here in
this intimate gossip you hear the
real spirit of the workers. Here at
,. t.
Farrand, Chairman
VaiU Warburjftr",Ut'0n
jight o'clock in the morning they
are led away by no oratory the
stark realities stare them in the
face, here they voice daily their un
alterable decision:
"We will never go back to the
old slavery!"
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE STANDARD
THE
*, W7
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL
illllllllllillilllilllllllllllllllll
AN APPEAL TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE
Three and one-half million Children In Eastern and Central Europe have
na alternative to disaster between now and uext harvest except American aid.
For months these most helpless sufferers in the track of war have been ad
mitted to American feeding-stations only if tragically undernourished, and
have received American medical aid only If desperately threatened by death
from disease.
Winter is dosing down. The money of many nations Is valueless outside
their own boundaries. Economic and crop conditions make famine, with Its
terrible train of diseases, certain visitor until next harvest, inevitably the
helpless children will suffer most. No child can grow to health and sanity on
tlje pitiful makeshifts for food with which millions of European adults must
content themselves this winter. It is obvious that the remedy can come only
from outside.
America saved 6,000,000 European children winter before last. Normal
recuperation cut the need nearly in half last year, but unusual conditions have
resulted in scant shrinkage of child destitution during the twelvemonth Just
pust. The response of America must now decide whether 3.f)00,00 of these
charges, in acute distress, shall begin to be turned away in Janunry from
more than 17,000 asylums, hospitals, clinics and feeding-stations dependent
•u American support. There would be no tragedy in history so sweeping or
so destructive of those who can deserve no evil.
x'f: The undersigned organizations, working among every race and creed,
many engaged also in other forms of relief, agree unanimously that the
plight of these helpless children should have complete priority In overseas
charity until the situation is met. This is an issue without politics and
without religious lines. There can be no danger of pauperization, for the
$2:5,000.000 for child food, and the $10,000,000 for medical service' that we
seek, wil* relieve only the critical cases. The medical supplies, of course,
must be an unqualified gift, but for every American dollar used in child
feeding, the governments and communities aided furnish two dollars In the
form of transportation, rent, labor, clerical help, cash contributions and such
food supplies as are locally obtainable.
America has not failed In the past In great heartedness. She has never
had a more poignant call than this. Contributions should be turned over to
the local committees which are now being formed for this national collection
or sent to Franklin K. Lane, Treasurer, Guaranty Trust Co., New York City.
EUROPEAN RELIEF COUNCIL
Haovar, Chairman Franklin
Comprltlnai
ATarr,n"har1!*Diro"o,?,',traMon' b* P'Am?riST^A«h^Tlp" Chr"St
American Red CrosB. by Livtneaton ,T.
K. Lane. Treasurer
y„
American Friends' Sarvtca Committee Flaherty. Supreme Knight
(Quakers), by Rufus M. Jonee. Chair- M. C. A., by C. V. Hlbbard. latar
man national Commute#
Coniml»"-
Ur
J. Brown
of
Cotumbu«, by James A.
Ml„ Sara* 8. Lyoa. Ma-
CHICHESTER S PILLS
TIIK MANONIfr IIRAMI. A
•A"** WIIAI
mqINI A*k your Hruffirl
lNII. A
Fill* in
»etal1lc\\W'
tiUnin.
'four
Ki and
Mold
metallic^
bo™*, sealed with lilue ItiUjon. v.#
Take other. Bur of your
AskforCiri»(j|n M*TEItll
DIAMOND IIKANIft IMM.H. for US
years known as Best, Safest, Always HcllaMf
SOLO BY DRUGGISTS EVtRVWHEfll
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE STANHARD
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE GOOD
as a citisen to aadlrriaad tha •etlceted chapter* in economies and it the history of *»o«r
COUtnr ta take aa affective part in the wcrfc of any fnr»eri» orranicatioR. co-iaerativa
aaoaty, trades«aiaa or women
club
a a a a a a W
ar 5a polities to know how to orvaaite aad atniia
S
heard aid ea wWr that will l». ti,m writ# at aaee for fall
far TWO MONTHS'
SVUDY WITH WALTER THOMAS
••star far hit carfaftaMaaceleatoat if yon caaaat cast taCalifaraia.
SERVIcCk!R.1,B.,
a a
is.fcihfc,,Cd.

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