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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, September 02, 1921, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1921-09-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXVIIII
STAGE OF THE FIGHT
Following are the facts:
Wiuited—A plausible excuse
tor calling off the recall election.
A liberal reward will be paid to
the lint person, male or female,
who caa Invest a justification
for withdrawing from the cam
paign at this time and save my
self and associates from becom
ing the faulting stock of the
people. Send all suggest ions to
"Two-Bit" Kelsoa, I. V.A. Head
quarters, Fargo, N. D.
The above want "ad" expresses the
sentiments of the I. V. A. bosses these
days. The Fargo Forum could Just as
well have run the above advertise
ment on every page every day the
past few weeks for it would not hav^
revealed any more clearly what the
I. V. A. is so anxiously looking for
than' some of the stories that it and
other anti-farmer papers have been
running lately.
Having received no suggestions
from outside sources, as far es
known, the I. V. A. bosses have
started to invent their own excuses
for quitting the fight at this time.
And, as a matter of course, the
League is being blamed for this as
it has been for everything else by
the disgruntled grain gambler and
big blanker politicians. It is the wick
ed Leaguers, according to the I. V. A..
who are going to make it impossible
to hold this election, or, if the elec
tion is actually held, nullify the re
sults if the I. V. A. wins.
Tom Hall's- Excuse
Tom Hall, I. V. A. secretary of
state, was as far as known, the first
to offer a suggestion for an I. V. A.
"The unemployed veterans are los
ing their faith in their country, their
faith In their God and their faith in
themselves," declared Harry D. Ja
cobs, president of the Ex-Service
Men's Reemployment Bureau, New
York City, while discussing the con
dition of the workers resulting from
long unemployment.
Service men, continued 'Jacobs,
are walking the streets by the tens
of thousands, competing with hun
dreds of thousands of other idle
workers whose condition is Just as
bad. These men, tramping wearily
from place to ploce, day after day,
meeting disappointment after dis
appointment, are hungry and discour
aged, Jacobs says.
"I say this as a warning," he con
tinued. "It it is not heeded the coun
try'will have a serious situation to
contend with later. As these hungry
men walk Fifth avenue they see
high-priced automobiles with two
BagUsh flunkies, each drawing down
$12t a month with board and lodg
ing thrown in.
i» *v
SlSSETON
LEMKE DECLARES RUMOR AN
I. V. A. INVENTION AIMED TO
DECEIVE VOTERS OF STATE
Anti-Farmer Forces, Split Up in Three
Factions, are Anxious to Delay Contest
CHAIRMAN LIEDERBACH BRANDS' FORUM'S WILD STORIES ABOUT
STATE OFFK IAIiS RESIGNING AS PURE BUNK AND DECLARES
THAT THESE ARE ONLY EXCUSES FOR LYING DOWN AT THIS
The Sisseton Courier, the local representative of ''Two Bit" Nelson's I.
V. A. crowd of outlaws in North Dakota, had emblazened upon its front page
last week an article to the effect that the North Dakota Industrial Commis
tion had resigned their respective offices to avoid the effects of the recall
election which is scheduled to be pulled in that state in the near future by
the I. V. A.'s as a last resort attempt to defeat the will of the people of North
Dakota in their fight to establish economic Justice.
What appeared in the Courior la st week and other papers of its stripe
throughout the northwest was nothing more nor less than a pepoeterous
falsehood, spawned in the filth of diseased minds, and handed to the boot
licking newspapers of this territory to publication in order to create senti
ment against farmer organization and poison the minds of uninformed and
Incredulous individuals. And we wish it to be specifically and everlastingly
understood by the farmes of this community that the Sisseton Courier is
responsible for the promulgation of this unjustifyable lie.
For the benefit of the Courier and those who are prone to fall for the
trash that publishes, we wish to give the facts regarding the attitude of
the North Dakota Industrial Commission regarding the I. V. A. recall and
their personal opinions with reference to the falsehood about them re
«igning.—(Ed.)
STARVING VETERANS LOSE
FAITH IN THEIR COUNTRY
alibi. Tom wouid have the people be
lieve that the recall election "would
be irregular and illegal beciause the
legislature. failed to provide an ap
proprlatton for the publicity pamph
let and thus prevented its use in the
campaign, "if the Leaguers are de
feated in the election they can bring
an action in court and it would un
dpubtedly be held illegal," opines
i'om, or something along that line
anyway.
But, being so desperately in need
of excuses, the I. V. A. bosses did
not stop with Hall's suggestion.
Somebody else, name not given, ap
pears to have almost convinced the
I. V. A. bosses that it would be of no
use to file any petitions and call the
election. They now declare the
Leaguers, can and will prevent even
the holding of the election.
According to {announcement by
the Fargo Forum Saturday evening
this is the way this is going to be
done:
Forum Also Has Alibi
Attorney General Leinke and
Commissioner Hagan are to resign
soon and Governor Frazier will ther
fill their positions with some other
good Leaguers. Then Governor Fra
zier will resign and under the law
Lieutenant Governor Wood will be
come governor. The Lelague woulc*
thus be in full control of the indus
trial commission and the state gov
ernment but the men against whom
the recall election had been called
having gone out of office, no such
election could be held.
(Continued on Page Eight)
"When our men go to the Shipping
Board to seek employment, they are
thrust aside and foreigners, even
Chinamen, are taken in their stead.
"They come to this office in droves
each day. They need Jobs, but first
they need food, a shave and a bath
tind frequently shoes. We can not
send them to a Job on an empty
stomach even if we had the Job."
Jacobs declared that many vet
erans left Jobs paying large salaries,
and when they returned they found
that employers had taken on men at
lower wages. He cited the case of a
veteran who left a $6,000 Job and
hadn't lost a day in 20 years until he
went into the army. He hasn't had
a day's work since his discharge
from the army.
Literally thousands of service men
are said to be sleeping in New York's
parks. Details of policemen have been
assigned to guard them. Rescue
missions are overcrowded, and chari
table organisations have exhausted
their resources and look to the ap
proaching winter with grave concern.
MANUFACTURER MISINFORMED
ABOUT NORTH DAKOTA AF
FAIRS TELLS GOVERNOR FRA­
ZIER OF ASSISTING IN FIGHT
AGAINST TOWNLEY SAYS "MY
PEOPLE HAVE PUT UP A LOT
OF MONEY TO HELP."
Bismarck, N. D„ August 23.—Sen
sational as well as amusing revela
tions as to the source of the cam
paign funds of the Independent Vot
ers' association were made by Gov
ernor Lyna J. Frazier in an address
at Gates hall, south of here yester
day.
Telling of a personal talk he had
,with Charles Velie. one of Amerl
fci's leading automobile and farm im
plement manufacturers, the governor
in his address charged that I. V. A.
headquarters were not telling the
people the truth neither as to the
origin nor as to the amount of funds
they are spending in the recall cam
paign.
"Our people have been trying to
find out." said the governor, "where
the I. V. A. organization gets the
money to carry on its dampaigns. On
my recent trip to Washington stati
I ran into something that proved to
me where at least a part of the money
comes from.
'It happened on Northern Pacific
Pat Reeves Dies
Suddenly Buried
Here Thursday
Pat Reeves died at the Powell hos
pital here Wednesday evening as the
result of heart failure.
Mr. Reeves has resided on the
Tony Nigg farm, near Browns Val
ley for the past three years, and
Tuesday, while doing his chores
about the barn preparatory to go
threshing, he had an attack of heart
failure and fell to the ground uncon
scious. He was later found by a
neighbor who rushed him to the hos
pital, but his condition was of such
serious nature that he expired Wed
nesday evening.
Mr. Reeves was not married and
was living alone on the farm. He
leaves no dependents, and so far as
we know had no relatives in this
part of the country. He had many
warm friends who will be grieved
to learn of his untimely death.
Burial took place Thursday in the
Catholic cemetery.
Old Patient—I wish to consult
you with regard to my utter losa of
memory.
Doctor—Ah, yes! Why-er-ih cases
of this nature, I always receive my
fee in advance.—Science and Inven
tion.
He—If I should kiss you would
you scream for help?
8he—I certainly should—ft you
required any.—Judge.
SlSSETON, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, SEPT. 2, 1921
WHERE POWERS OF WORLD MAY AGREETO LAY DOWN ARMS
VELIE GETS WIRES CROSSED
SPILLS CAPAIGN FUND DOPE
train No. 3, Monday morning, August'
8, on the first day out of Bismarck.
I had been to breakfast in the din
er and was goipg black to my sleep
ing car. Passing through a compart
$ ent car. a man who was sitting at a
table in one of the compartment#,
said:
'Hello, governor come here a
minute. I want to tlatk to you.'
"I stepped into the compartment.
The man continued:
Put Up a Lot of Money
"Myjjame is, Velie of the Deere
Webber Machine .company of Minne
apolis. My people have put a lot of
money in your state to help you in
your fight. I was in North Dakota a
short time ago with President Pen
nington of the Soo: made a trip ove'
iiis road stopped in a number of
places and talked with the business
men and from what I can gather you
have got Townlev on the run.'
'I don't know about that,' said
I.
"I presume that Velie began to no
tice my surprised look, especially
after he had said that his people had
put up money to help me in my fight,
for I knew that men of his kind were
not friends of the farmer movement.
At any rate. Velie asked:
'You are fighting Townley
aren't you.'
Trio Arrested for
Destruction rees
of A. F. Feeney
Howard Olson, Arnold Duerr and
Otto Kirsch were arrested Thursday
of this week and brought before
Judge D. J. Prindiville charged with
maliciously cutting down and de
stroying ornamental shade
lre33
on
the property of A. F. Feanny of
Claire Citv. They waived hearing and
were bound over to the next term of
court.
The same day Howard Olson made
complaint before Judge D. J. Prindi
ville alleging that Edith Feeney at
tacked him and threatened his life,
I and asking that she be arrested and
[required to give security to keep the
peace.
The facts leading up the the fore
going arrest as we undertsand them
are as follows:
It appears that the otter Tail Pow
er company is extending a line on
from Efflngton through Claire City.
Certain ornamental shade trees be
longing to A1 T. Feeney, of Claire
City were so situated that they inter
fered with the extension line. There
fore, Howard Olson, Arnold Duerr
and Otto Kirsch, members of the Ot
ter Tall Power Company extension
crew, cut down the offending trees
and cast them from them. This was
done in the calm and otherwise si
lent night, persumably because the
(Continued on Page Four)
H.-
I
tgOwtg
Got Wires Crossed
'Why, no, Mr. Townley and I
have never had any trouble. In fact,
we are fighting for the same cause
to better farming conditions in North
Dakota.'
"Velie appeared very much sur
prised. All he could say was:
"Well, I guess I've got my wires
crossed.
'We pride ourselves,' continued
I, 'of paving the only state in the
union where the people really rule.'
"*I guess you and I can't get to
gether. I guess the Joke is on me.'
said Mr. Velie."
Governor Frazier is satisfied that
Velie got his "wires crossed" as a
result of reading only such newspa
pers as the Minneapolis Journal and
Tribune, the St. Paul Pioneer-Press
and other reactionary newspapers
which last November played up the
tact that O'Connor was leading, on
the first returns but either gave lit
tle space or said nothing whatever
about the final lead of the League
candidates.
Some one had evidently told Velie
"the governor of North Dakota" was
cn the train and so he must have
Jumped to the conclusion that he wlas
talking to O'Connor, the anti
League candidate for governor..
A smkll girl was "afraid of the
dark." Her mother, anxious to over
come this weakness, said as she was
leaving her, Remember, darling, that
ad angel will still be with you when
I take the candle away."
"Mummy," pleaded a small voice,
"I'd much rather you took the angel
and left the candle."—Boston Globe.
Western farmers are preparing to'
burn their corn for fuel this winter
instead of buying coal, they told the
Interstate Commerce Commission in
its investigation of freight rates on
grain and hay. Freight rates on coal
are prohibitive, they said, nd at the
same time they have practically de
stroyed the agricultural industry.
Every witness that appeared be
fore the commission pictured the
plight of farmers and invariably laid
the blame to freight rates. Ruin is
widespread and growers are discour
aged to the point where they will
abandon tneir farms unless relief is
given them.
Secretary of Agriculture Wallace
stated that freight rates have vir
tually stopped production, and he
predicted that if they are continuei
production in the future is going to
be greatly curtailed.
It was stated that it will take Ave
years to restore to productiveness
HIGH RATES RUIN FARMER
DON'T KICK, SAYS CUYLER
No. 11
BOY HAS CLOSE
CM! WITH LIVE
WIRE FRIDAY
iYLE PARKER, SON OF MR.
AND M*R8. JIM PARKER HAS
SERIOUS ACCIDENT
While Playing Comes In Contact
With A Live Electric Wire, and
... Narrowly Escapes Death
From Shock
A.V-
The little son of Mr. anf Mrs. Jas.
Parker met ^rith a terrible accident
Friday morning when he came In
contact wlth^e live wire and would
have been Electrocuted but for the
timely aid of the chiropractor doc
tor, J. A. Rlchels. The little fellow,
who is about five years old, Was
playing in the alley back of the Pal
ace Cafe where his mother Is em
ployed as waitress. His groans were
heard by Dr. Rlchels, who hastened
to Investigate. When he reached the
where he had grasped the wire in his
child he found him unconscious
where he had grasped the wire in hjs
play. He was taken to the Powell
hospital, where he regained con
sciousness about twelve hours later,
and at the present time Is totting
along nicely. No one had been cog
nisant of the live wire which had
occurred in this way. A barn, which
stood by the alley had been moved
several wtfeks ago, necessitating the
cutting of the light wires which con
nected it with the rooms above the
Burn** Wolff store.- As no one was
ocupying the rooms at the time there
was no current. Dr. and Mrs. Rlchels
later .moyed to the rooms, "aW'a me
ter was Installed about a'week pre
vious to the accident. No one "re
membered the severed wire, which
was charged with the current by the
Installing of the meter, until the boy
in his play, took hold of It.
O. E. LIEN BUYS HOLSTEIN HERD
O. E. Lien of Sisseton Just return
ed from a trip to Iowa where he pur
chased a fine Holstein herd, seven
females and a herd bull. This makes
the second lot of Holstelns that Mr.
Lien has shipped in. Last year he
purchased some cows from near
Litchfield, Minnesota. This herd is
handled on a rented farm near New
Ellington. He is a firm believer that
the only way to make out on the
farming game is to get Into corn,
hogs and cows. That combination
never tails. Roberts County is fast
becoming a dairy center. We predict
that some day it will be a close rival
to some of the rich dairy centers of
Wisconsin and Minnesota. The pres
ent depression in business Is not
making a dent in bank deposits in
those sections. He says the dairy cow
hos done It.
When a girl begins calling you by
your first name, watch out, boy! She
likes your last one.—Judge.
farms that are being forced out of
operation by present conditions.
As though in answer to these com
plaints,- Thomas DeWitt Cuyler,
chairman of. the Association of Rait
way Executives, declared that there
was no immediate prospect of a gen
eral reduction of carrying charges.
The roads are not yet earning the 6
per cent guaranteed them by Con
gress, and until it is realized, Cuyler
declared, the public must bear Its
burdens with as much patience as It
can command.
Cuyler expressed the belief that
the "railroads have turned the cor
ner," and he forcasted net earnings
this year of about 3 per cent. The
railroad industry can not grow until
it can "surely pay dividends to thosq
who Invest their money in it," Cuy
ler stated, followed by the definite
declaration that until the full return
of 6 per. cent is assured the public
need expect no relief, even If that
policy means the destruction of agri
culture. :v"
Jrf',

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