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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, September 02, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1921-09-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
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BUILDING
This building, recently completed and
modern throughout, is used both for the
grades and the high school. It provides for
nineteen class rooms, junior and senior as­
sembly halls, special rooms for agriculture,
home economics, norma) training, kinder­
garten, manual training, and for gymnas­
ium-auditorium /which has a seating ca­
pacity of about seven hundred. Gymnasium
equipment, shower "oaths, a w?i equipped
stage, and a motion picture outfit help to
make this gymnasium «i-rve -he schjal f.nd
the community in various ways.
The cost of the building nd the equip­
ment is approximately 5125,000
The course consists of four units
NORMAL TRAINING
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The Normal Training Department was organized in September, 1919. The pur
pose of tbis department is to provide facilities for the training of teachers for the
rural schools in counties where there are no state normal schools. High school grad
uates completing this course received without examination a teachers certificate.
For 1919-20, the department had an enrollment ot eleven, nine'of whom com
pleted the course. Eight were teaching in Roberts CountyJast year. During the past
year twelve students enrolled, and a still larger number is expected for 1921-22.
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rural school management, the state course of study, reviews of the coimmon branches,
one elective besides observation and practice teaching. This year the pupils of the
normal training department offered a kindergarten course, during April and May, for
twenty children Who will enter the first grade next fall. This work afforded excellent
opportunity for practice teaching.
The entire class visited several rural schools in the vicinity. This year, if pos
sible, each student will be given an opportunity to do practice teaching in a rural
school. Observation was done in the grades of the Sisseton school. Each member of
the department has had nine weeks' practice teaching.
The normal training subjects are taught by Mise Calvert who has had splendid
preparation for this type of work. In recognition of the high standards attained the
school receives |700 annually ia state aid.
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work. It includes methods, rural sociology,'
locals
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Bealdea tb« tMn pteytd ^wetle* S«mM with the, 8}aseton and Peever
Uams. The tMa is general pUy^l T«nr cr^iwble and snappy came.
irt Carter formed a Tetr stronc battery and everywhere received
ffavorable oomnent. &*?:•
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SISSETON WEEKLY STANDARD
Sisseton Public Schools Open Tuesday, September 6,1921
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HOME ECONOMICS
The school maintains* a Smith
Hughes department of Home Eco
nomics. This calls for the very high
est standards, both as to the prepara
tion of the teacher and equipment.
The state department recognizes thn
efficiency o£ f.ie work by the giving
of $700 as state and federal aid.
Our Home Economics Department
has made consistent progress since
its introduction. During the year
1920-21 seventy-seven girls enrolled.
The cooking laboratory and dining
room are located in the basement.
The kitchen is equipped for a class
of sixteen girls. It contains eight
double work tables with drawers to
hold the necessary utensils, eight
double burner electric stoves with
ovens, and one large electric range
with oven. The sewing room and the
fitting room are located on the see
on floor. The equipment consists of
four large sewing tables and five
sewing machines.
Besides studying the principles of
cooking, the girls have been given
practical experience in preparing and
serving meals. During the cold weath
er, they served hot luclies to the
children, at cost. Lunches were pre
pared for the basket ball teams after
each game. Besides, they partook o£
a breakfast prepared by themselves,
and entertained at two dinners, one
for their mothers and the other for
the faculty and school board.
In the elementary sewing class, plain under
wear, aprons, and simple dresses have been
made. In the dress-making class, waists, skirts,
lingerie and woolen dresses, men's shirts, made
over garments, and other practical articles have
been made. This work has been supplemented
by a careful study of textiles.
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Last year in order to better serve the com
munity, the S. H. S. introduced a department of
agriculture which operates under the Smith
Hughes Act of 1917. In spite of the many handi
caps in getting equipment and material we now
have a department that compares very favorably
with the best in the state. This is as it should be
for Sisseton is one of the most favorable and
ripe places for this kind of work.
Further, this is a type of education
that tends to become operative within
the community. Economically con
sidered it also has the advantage of
jeing less expensive to the community
than most academic education, for
half of the salary of the instructor is
paid by the federal government.
With our constantly decreasing per
capita production of the' staple
crops and meats, improvement of our
agricultural condition is national in
scope and. concerns, directly or in
directly, the present prospects of
every man, woman and child of this
fair land of ours. As measured in the
light of the older nations of the
world, the most rapid, far-reaching
and effective means towards the bet*
terment of our nation agriculturally
is education. This sets into action the
greatest force and power of a nation,
the intellect. Largely as a result of
education, England, Germany and
France have aproxlmately doubled
their per acre production in the last
80 to 100 years. If these countries
had to do so, we ought to do so be
fore we have to.
Only the first years work ot the
agricultural course was offered last
year. This consisted of "Crop Fro
duetion and Soils," Farm 8hop Work
and Project Work. This year will be
added a course in farm machinery,
motors and tractors, besides the
study of dairying, poultry,, vegetable
gardening and fruit growing. It
should be noted that these subjects
count the same toward graduation
or toward college entrance as any
other course.
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WHY ATTEND THE SISSETON HIGH
SCHOOL jjsv
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1. Because, the Sisseton High School is
fully accredited by State Board of
MANUAL TRAINING DEI'PARTMENT
The department occupies three rooms. Besides the necessary small tools and
seventeen individual work benches, power machinery consisting of an electric driven
drill, a lathe, a band saw, and a tool grinder which adds greatly to the scope and ef
ficiency of the shopwork, have been installed.
The classes this year consisted of a class in woodwork, largely Juniors, a
class in shopwork, Smith-Hughes Vocational, largely Freshmen, besides a class each
of Seventh and Eighth Grade boys.
Besides fixing up the shop, making six work benches, nail and screw cabinets,
shelving, etc., and installing the shop machine ', aud table, play-ground apparatus,
and other smaller pieces, the boys have made numerous very creditable pieces for
themselves. Clifton Foss, the leading member of the class in woodwork, made an of
fice table, a Morris chair, a porch swing, and several smaller articles for himself, be
sides spending much time on pieces for the school. In general the boys have made
such articles as library tables, writing desks, typewriter tables, magazine stands,
book racks, pedsetals, tabourets and diverse other smaller pieces. Considerable time
has been devoted to the technique of the care and use of tools. Anyone having com
pleted the course should feel competent to plan and execute any ordinary piece of
.. work.. ... ...
TABULAR REPORT OF BOYS' GAMES
Date Team Where Locals
12-3-20 Waubay Waubay 19 32
12-10-20 Browns Valley Browns Valley 11 17
12.22-20 Browns Valley Browns Valley 15 1»
.1- 6-21 Big Stone Big Stone 21 24
1- 4-21 Town Team Sisseton 8 19
1-14-21 Waubay Sisseton 17 11
1-26-21 Peever Peever S3 25
1-28-21 Milbank Sisseton 30 4
2-11-21 Veblen Veblen 3« 19
2-16-21 Peever Sisseton 43 11
2-18-21 Town Team Sisseton 17 8
2-25-21 Big Stone 8isseton 8 15
,.c. 3- 3-31 Lemcon Aberdeen 27 14
3- 4-21 Selby Aberdeen 21 41 1
3-15-21 Veblen Sisseton ,., 34 11
3-19-21 Big Stone Milbank 18 20 *, 1
Education and receives the highest
classification accorded any school
in this state.
2." Because, its graduates are admitted to
the leading colleges and universi
ties without entrance examinations.
3. Because, it has a splendidly equipped
building with accommodations sec
ond to none in this part of the
state.
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4. Because, it has one of the best gym
nasiums to be found in the high
schools of the state.
5. Because, it is presided over by a staff
of college trained teachers with
years of successful experience and
special training for their particular
k.nd of work.
6. Because, it offers a variety of courses
and subjects that will enable a
student to get what he needs
whether he intends to go to col
lege or not.
V'thjsv. 382
Oppo
nents
Oppo
nents
1
302

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