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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, September 02, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1921-09-02/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
PS"
By Walter W. Liggett
Special Correspondent
Washington, D. C., Aug. 31.—Con
gress finally succeeded in obtaining
its 'long desired recess, although a
fillibuster On
ate will reconvene on Sept.
consideration of the tariff and taxa
tion measures already passed by the
house, but the lower body will not
go into session gain until Oct. 3.
agree
would allow the corporation to lend
directly to European purchasers, but
it did Include cooperative societies
as eligible for loans, and provided
that banks .receiving advances under
the act coutt only charge 2 per cent
commission for loans made to in-
FACTS FROM THE INSIDE
AT WASHINGTON, D. C.
The recess was orginally sought,
some six weeks ago. by reactionaries ,te
farm relief bill.
gambling bill, and similar legislation.
These attempts were defeated by
members of the agricultural bloc who
forced their colleagues to stay on
the Job untl these matters were dis
posed of.
President Signs Farm Rill
One of the last acts of the house
was the passag of the bill author
ising the War Finance Corporation
to issue $1,500,000,000 bonds and
to lend $1,000,000,000 for financing
ua
,*rman Treaty
tn
Labor Day
There is no use to Labor
Unless You Save
The only safe and sure way to save
is to have a bank account
Begin this
LABOR DAY
WITH US
CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK
SISSETON, SOUTH DAK6TA
OFFICERS
Henry Helvig, President J. W. Barrington, V. P.
Leo J. Lukanitsch, Cash. M. O. Eikum, Asst. Cash
R. Thompson, Teller
(V
'BSC
dividuals. The additional 1500,000,-
000 bonds authorized in the act will
be utilized for the purchase of rail
road securities.
President Harding signs the bill
I on the last day of the session and th»
the beer bill at the War Finance board has announced
elevenft hour threatened to hold the that it already has near completion
senate in session indefinitely. Sena- I to wheat growers' associations in
tor Reed and a handful of wets swore loans to wheat growers' association
they would talk the rest of the sum- in Idaho, Oregon and Montana which
mer before permitting passage of will res ilt in the nxporut'or. of 5.
legislation allowing the search of I 500.000 bushels. The hi!! is 11 .t as
automobiles by revenue agents. The effective as the Norris farm export
drys were equally obdurate at first, i,iu which was killed bv Prcsideiv
but finally weakened when they saw Harding's interfer?n. y, but it is
their vacation flitting and agreed to finitely better than :io l!
postponement of the vote. The sen- I will end to relieve desperate si'. ceeaings in secret
... will reconvene on Sept. 21 for
all and
everlasting dishonor to make sepa.-
peace with Ge
•who wanted to block passage of the jUst beea signed by Senator Lodge ^thiT whole^onference is a
the anti-grain
chairmatl or
farm exports. The house refused to 'many waives all claims against the at a secret conference to which we
"IBB BEST YET*
of H.*.
J-
1
tion among the western a:ii south- Versailles Treaty was the greater
•n farmers.
Althougi ena or ... disarmament conference would end
in iai# that it would brand us with
in 1918
vcitizims against the German govern- difficult 1 to.conceive how much can
pnent have been settled that Ger-j be accomplished toward disarmament
to the senate provisions which jinked States and that fines and for- .send delegates committed in »d- 1
feituies imposed by the United States vance to a continuation of a militar
are confirmed. It is believed that the
Senate will ratify the treaty with
very little delay when it reconvenes.
That will mean trade with Germany
can be resumed with out harrassing
regulations.
Sept 12-17
from farm and
th*
ucafidiSal
haadof tha Public
lad this a valuabla mm-
5^
Secret Diplomacy Prevail*
"Open covenants openly arrived
at' will not be the policy of the dis
armament conference which Presi
dent Harding has called in Wash
ing on armistice day. "this was made
manifest when Senator Lodge,
U. spokesman of the administration, in
duced Senator Harrison of Missis-
Isippi to withdraw his amendment to
the bill appropriating funds for con
ference which provided for full pub
licity of all proceedings. Sen.itor
Lodge said the amendment was
"wholly out of place and futile ba
manners." He added that "open dip
ped that "it is the invariable practice
lomacy" was impractical «'id assert
of legislative bodies to frame im
portant measures bemnd closed
doors."
Senator Borah, author of the bill
instructing the President to call the
conference, vigorously attacked the
evident intention to shroud the pro-
menace to the worId
rmany." the treaty the meetings were held in the open.
the foreign relation to that the whole conference is a
as cna rxuau heartv camouflage to throw a smoke screen
committee, has given it nis nearcy ... ....
sanction. The document has only
been shown to members of this com
mittee, but it provides that Germany
accept fell obligations to the United
States enumerated in the Treaty
Versailles that property of German
citizens now in the hands of the
alien property custodian remain in
custody until claims
istic policv
Senator LaFollette, Stanley and
Pittman have brought in a minority
report opposing the $500,000,000
loan to the raolroads contemplated
by' the Townsend bill. The report
gives seven reasons why the loan
should not be passed. The first is
that it was reported after a refusal
to hear the testimony of critics. The
second is it would put the govern
ment in the highly speculative busi
ness of dealing with railroad secur
ities. The third reason joints out the
government would lose hundreds of
millions of dollars as a result of rhe
transaction. The bill provides the
government must accept the secur
ities on a 6 per cent basis, whereas
the best securities are on a seven per
cent basis. This means the govern
ment and the railroads against each
or sell them at a loss. The fourth rea
son declares the government is not
legally or morally bound to make the
loan and that tin c'ims of tae gov
ment nd the railroads against each
other should be set off. The fifth
reason asserts that if the War Fi
nance corporation takes over the
railroads securities it will have no
money left for farm credits. The six
th reason says railroad earnings and
credits are slowly improving and no
legislation of this sort is needed. The
seventh reason points out that dur
ing the past 18 months the govern
ment has advanced the railroads $1,
376,403,024 and that the people
should not be burdened with taxes
to embark upon this "highly specu
lative ventures." The minority
report makes out a very strong case
against the railroad loan and Will
iam G. McDoo, former director gen
eral of railroads under government
control, has also declared himself
against it. A lively fight will be pre
cipitated when congress reassembles,
for President Harding has set his
heart on this measure and will en
deavor to force it through despite
all opposition.
Shipping Board Under Fire
The United States Shipping Board
is under fire again and its critics
have plenty of ammunitipn. This de
partment which has squandered and
itolen nearly three fillion dollars of
the people's money does not seem to
have changed its ways much under
new management. Two hundred ships
management. Two hundred ships
which cost the government more
than (200,000 each were recently
^sold tor $2,100 apiece and several
senators hare exposed the fact that
many "lame duck" RepnK'can poli
ticians are being given soft snaps
on the government payroll. Some of
them get as high as $25,000 a year,
the government la also continuing
tta policy„of making contracts ander
terms that practically constitute «n
invitation to dotraod the government,
•verrbody in WMhlngton knows the
•hipping t«ar4 reeka with graft, but
the ^Democrats 4* aot 'want an in
iiMiiii lty voald reflect
ob
Wilson and the Republicans op
*oe*» Mft* JMpiRft toow coii
are Just aa bad aiaee the
change of 3*
ati-"— the looting goee merrily
SISSETON WEEKLY STANDARD
today and
bl'ained this on the hidden intrigues
of few diploma
ts. He predicted the
in the same disappointment unless
over a new league of nations. It is
very doubtful indeed whether any
material reduction of armaments
^rill be agreed upon. Senator Lodge
who has been appointed as one of
this nation's representatives, al
ready has gone on record as saying
the United States has reduced its
of American navy beyond the safety point. It is
on and people wonder why taxes are
high.
I/Kollette Is Recompensed
IM'cshh'iit Gets Dye Kmbargo
The indefensible embargo on
dyes, which I wrote about last week
as being temporarily defeated, was
finally put through the senate by the
active interposition of President
Harding. This gives the American
trust an absolute monopoly of the
market and permits it to charge ex
tortionate prices for inferior goods.
Reserve Boanl Flayed Again
J. C. Wanamaker, president of the
American Cotton Growers' associa
tion, Is the latest farm producer to
accuse the federal reserve banking
board of playing Wall Street's game.
Mr. Wanamaker appeared before
the committee on agricultural inquiry
last week and scored the governors
of the reserve system for their dis
crimination against the farmers. He
demanded the removal of the pres
ent board and asked that a new
board of 12 members be created on
which there should be farmers and
business men as well as bankers.
There is a growing demand for re
form in the Federal reserve system
and a determined fight to make it
•more representative of the people
and legg respons
jve
t0
the narrowly
selfish needs of Wall Street will be
made when Congress re-convenes.
Real Estate
Transfers
M. L. Swanberg to Carl Schade,
NE% -26-127-50, $6400.00
W. O. Earl to G. L. Englund &
Hjalmar Erickson, L. 11 B. 13 Ros
holt, $200.
H. H. Baker, Sheriff to Gold Bros.
Sec. Co. SWy4 32-122-49, $3S34.S8.
C. F. Porter to Leola Hull NEl,4
SE1-4 6-125-53, $400.
Anton Olson to Johnny O. Olson
NE1-4 17-128149, $1.00.
Anton Olson to Agnes Braaten,
Sl-2 and NE1-4 SE1-4 16-128149,
$1.00.
JJ. M. Ravmond to A. E. Snow L.
1-2 Sec. 15 L. 1-2-3 Wl-2 NE1-4 El-2
NW1-4 Wl-2 SE1-4 SE1-4 16 Nl-2
NE1-4 21 L. 1 NW1-4 NW1-4 22
124-49, $1.00.
L. S. Hougen to Helmer Ericlcson
SW1-4 10 NW1-4 15-122-50. $35840.
Alfred Hjellming to Minnie Cotton L.
819-10 B. 6 First Add Anderson,
$150.
Howard Redearth to W. S. Thelin
NE1-4 NW1-4 20-124-50, $100.
FOR SALE—1917 Ford touring
car. See Johnson & Oletzke. A-2t.
Where to Worship
TO FARMERS
If you are sending that boy or that
girl to town to attend school, have
you thought about, and arranged for.
them to attend Sunday school and
church? If not, we will be glad to
welcome them and you to our ser
vices. We have a fine bunch of
christian young people 'who will re
ceive them cordially. The secular
amusements of our city will bid for
your loved ones, but that life means
death eternally. We offer Jesus
Christ and through Him life eternal.
The Methodist Episcopal church,
"A home-like church."
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Sunday school, 10 a. m. Morning
worship, 11 a. m. Junior and Ep
worth League, 7 p. tn. Evening wor
ship and song service 8 p. in. Prayer
meeting Thursday 8 p. m.
Henry D. Gough, pastor.
GOODWILL LITTHKRAX CHURCH
Norwegian service 10:SO. Sunday
school and Bible class 12:00. League
4:45. English Service 8:00. English
service at 8aroh at 3:00 p.
TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH
Morning service at 10:30. Sunday
school at 11:30. Visitors are wel
come.
Service In the Norway church
September 11, at 11 o'clock, In th*
Norwegian language.
"All «ir yovni kav»
call thta mod*! tke Blanaia WiL"
"flta cloeelyt"
HBaqr to Slip on."—
'5b-
"BUS
Back in 1917. when Senator LaFol- more or less!—!a toons Magazine.
lette made a speech before the Non
partisan League convention at St.
Paul, he was charged with disloyalty
by the Minnesota public safety com
mission and an effort was made to
unseat him on the strength of a false
miss quotation of what he said. After
long hearings, the Senate investi
gating committee dismissed the
charges as untrue. This week tiie
senate unanimously voted
Senator LaFollette $5,000 for the
expense to which he .was put by these
false charges.
VV' Notwithstanding
No girl now marries a.man tor
better or worse. She marries him for
PROGRESSIVE TEACHERS
The Northern Normal and Indus
trial School offers courses that lead
to all types of State Certificates and
the B. A. Degree in Education. Over
1000 progressive teachers attended
the Summer session. Free scholar
ships for ex-service men. for honor
high school graduates, and for Nom
inees by state senators and represent
atives. Fall quarter opens Septem-
to pay ber 19th, 1921. Send for catalog or
illustrated booklet. Special bulletins
on Physical Education for men.
Harold W. Foght, President.
A-26-2t-pd.
Shoes Repaired
Up stairs over'
Waletisch and Plut
store.
A A
owner.
Swedlund
All Kinds of
Real Estate
Insurance
Bonds
•3.
Let Lang Do It
We nre always on the job
and at your service for any
thing in the dray business. II
you have anything to be mov
ed or delivered call
no*!«
Be photographed
this year on your
birthday.
"WE'LL DO IT!"
"o to the Sisseton Garage, across from the Commercial Hotel, and
have your automobile or tractor repaired by experts. Hurry and
avoid a delay. Get our reduced prices. First-class work and guar
anteed to be satisfactory.
SISSETON GARAGE
You Must Plan
Your Financial Career
Plan your work
then work your plan
137
K. Bowe
The Photographer in
lour Town
NOTICE
Beginning
September
1, We will
sell for
cash only.
Claire City
Co-Op. Merc.
Company.
A few men are "lucky",
but most successful busi
ness men have used good
judgment.
'.^StcomrNATiowiBiNK
.. OSTEOPATHY PROPERLY UNDERSTOOD IS AN EX­
CELLENT ROAD TO HEALTH. WHY NOT MAKE YOUR
HEALTH THE FIRST THING IN YOUR LIFE AND A GOOD
TIME SECONDARY? IT IS NOT STRENGTH BUT HEALTH
THAT MAKES FOR EFFICIENCY. IT ISN'T THE LARGEST
TREE THAT BEARS THE BEST FRIUT.
W. SHEPHERDSON
OSTEOPATHY PHYSICIAN ANT SURGEON
OVER MMHi DRUG WOM •SMaTON, 8. D.
v:
:r-Vvvo.
vf
Si"

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