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The Sisseton weekly standard. (Sisseton, Roberts County, S.D.) 1892-1929, November 11, 1921, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062049/1921-11-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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LAY PLANS FOR MlSMfill
SHIP DRIVE IN ROBERTS
COUNTY TO START
IMMEDIATELY
|»g' Several Townships Are Repre
lllll sented Good Eats, Good
1
Speaking and Good
Fellowship
In
reau
order that the Farm Bu­
Federation
be
manner,
brought
that
be­
fore thef farmers of Roberts
county in
a
more comprehensive
its activities
ened and its influe.
and
I purposes may be more thorou^h
I ly
understood,
its
scope broad­
Tore ef­
fectively felt,' the Farm Bureau
Board of Roberts county Wed
nesday evening gave a banquet
at
the home of Mrs. Maline Pe
terson to representatives of the
different townships in the coun
ty,
at which time and place plans
were perfected for a member
ship drive, which starts immed
iately.
It was the intention of the
board to have every township in
the county represented at the
.meeting, but weather conditions
were such as to keep many away.
'.:" »The representation, however,
was very good, and a good
meeting was the result,
/-1 After those present had par
taken ef the many -good things
to eat which had been prepared
by Mrs. Peterson in her o*rn in
imitable style, speeches were in
order.
Mr W. P. Wohlheter, county
farm bureau secretary, very
creditably discharged the duties
of toastmaster, and after
a
few
introductory remarks, called up
on Mr. R. R. Buchanan, local
agent, to explain the purpose of
the meeting and the work of the
Bureau in Roberts county His
talk, needless to say, was to the
point, interesting and instruc
tive. Next to be introduced was
If. R. Benedict, state secretary,
of Huron, who made the main
speech of the evening. Mr..Ben
edict went into the subject thor4
oughly and extensively, point
ing out among numerous other
things what had been accom
plished by the Farm Bureau in
the way of improved legislation,
reduced freight rates, etc., for
the benefit of agriculture.-' He
explained in detail under what
advexee conditions and trying
circumstances an.,, organization
which- had for its purpose,, the.
betterment of marketing condi
tions was compelled to work. He
made it clear that an undertake
fing of such magnitude was not
to be luxomplished in a day, a
week or a year, and that- if the
farmen were to benefit byan
organization of any k'rtd it wa*
absolutely necessary to form a
solid front and wonjc as a unit.
He explained the folly of indi
vidual endeavor in a matter of
this kind, and emphasizer, as has
been so often done before, that it
was the purpose of the chambers
*«f commerce and other organisa
tions that have for their purpose
trolHngof the farmers*
to k«Rp4he farmen di
into smallor groopeand
they
themselves, walk up the center
Mr. Benedict is ddicg.etHe-TH
undisturbed and take every
thing. Mr. Benedict is a good
talker, is well posted and h's
talk was comprehensive and
highly beneficial to everybody
present.
Others who answered to
toasts were G. R. Wodford, of
Mansfield, S. D. Aug. W. John
son of Madison, Minn. Chas. F.
Schlime, of Clinton, Minn. and
D. C. McLean, of Webster. These
gentlmen gave talks that were
well received, all of which were
appreciated and instructive.
Those who responded to invi
tations sent out by the Farm
Bureau board were as follows:
Ed Twitero, Enterprise town
ship H. L. Mussetter, Sisseton
Paul Sievert, Sisseton O. A.
Torvik, Sisseton C. M. For.der
Peever Miller Peterson, Pe?ver
H. P. Sorenson, Wilmot H. A.
Varland, Grant township: Galen
Plant, Bryant O. K. Sather,
Hart township H. H. Baker,
Sisseton R. R. Buchanan, Sis
seton Olaf Negaard, Sisse'on
D. C. McLean, Webster
Gee
M.
Conley, Britton Chas. F. Sch
lupine, Clinton, Minn. Aug. W.
Johnson, Madison, Minn.*. W. P.
Iheter, Sisseton R. Ben
t, state secretary, Huron
John Meland, Sisseton G. Rv
Wodford, Mansfield, S. D. A. O.
Torvik, Sisseton: W. A. Wells,
Sissieton M- A. Leversee,.'Har
mon township, and J. F. Bowers,
Sisseton.
County Agent Buchanan ar
ranged to have all those invited
to meet at his office in the court
house, and about eight o'clock
all repaired to home of Mr.".
Peterson*, where «n elcgan ban
quet was in waiting, the veil
chosen menu consisting of the
following:
Cream of tomato soup, celery
and olives, roast pork with stew
ed, apples, rice potatoes and
brown gravy, pineapple and pi
mento salad, cream peas, cran
berry sauce, brick ice cream and
devil's food cake, coffee, agar*
and cigarettes.
Miss Esther Rieck, Miss Flor
ence Hagen, Miss Alice Erick
son and Miss Gladys Hanson, in
a very pleasing and proficient
manner, did theserving.
...Continual op. .page 8
BAD EXAMPLE
Ja»eph
Letter famous
for an attempt to corner
the wheat market, has had
Inore than $800,000 worth
of liquors stolen from his
country home near Wash
ington.
Letter's booze corner
may have been created be
fore it was against the law
to fill Ms cellar full of
tanglefoot, but the general
public will think the oppo
site. It sets a bad, if not a
dangerous example, when
a few rich nisn make a
monkey of the law. It
creates a spirit of lawless
hsm among the people and
far froma frlendlyfesling
award the
While returning frOm a hunt
ing trip in the hills Tuesday
about noon, Henry and George
Waletich and Harold Arrow
smith met with an accident that
proved rather disastrous to the
car which they were driving, but
nothing more than a few mo
ments of hair-raising experience
to the occupants.
They were enjoying the un
usual—that is, motoring on a
real road—and everything was
going fine and all sitting pretty
until they reached the Herick
stad place. At about this point
in the journey the boat in which
they were sailing took"
a fool no
tion to, do something different,
and headed, nose first, down, the
grade and into the rock and
brush beside the road. Before
the boys had time to realize what
the jiciitter was. up to, she had
railed herself upoty two wheels
and' made ihe journey, lodging
against a large bolder about
twenty feet below..
llie youiig men were., indeed
fortunate in escaping without,
injury. The car, however, was
accideptt -vm:- caused bar
breaking of a connecting rod un
der the car.
For the information of those
whose nfinds run to the moon
shine theory in cases of this na
ture| wewisji to #tfte-thst booze
took'no pjirtin theflMitterwhat
.-
ANNIVERSARY MEETING
(|r^9A^K^A^p|rS
J. 'C. kinapp attended a meet
ing of the Masonic lodge at Mil
bank Friday. The meeting was
the celebration of the 169th an
niversary of the initiation of
Geo. Washington .into the Ma
sonic order, and was conducted
wholly by past masters of the
Milhank lodge.: HMM-^ran'irak
io ttote caadldalee initialed.
SISSETON, SOUTH DAKOTA^PElDAYy NOVEMBER, 11,1921
ft MI an inspiring moment for those permitted to be present, when
Marshal Foch, commander-in-chief of. all allied armies, visited the tomb
•f Washington on his second day in America. The great French hero
placed a wreath in tribute to the genius of Washington. Foch's arrival
America for the American Legion convention at Kansas City and
attendance at the Armament conference hi Washington, marked th«
•tart of the most enthusiastic reception mt ficorded a foreign visitor.
All the way across the continent, iCarahat Foilt and General Pershing
were met by record crowds, who cheeredtMnl Foch himself was often
mored to tears of appreciation.'
Auto Goes Small Town
Over Bank Looms-Ford
Ford
Interview With Henry
"AtVipw 4e«^^Mv
were local- flouring-mills in the
small towns. Then came patent
processes, big mills, consolida
tion. The Httle mills were shut
down. Now they are making
small flour-mill plants that will
produce, the same flour, in very
small establishments and we
shall be returning presently to
the old system of the local mill,
supplying the local market. That
will cut out another big item of
waste transportation.
'The new era will see a great
redistribution of industry back
to the country. This country has
got to live in the country in
dustry -must be taken back to the
country small dties and towns
should supply more of their re
quirements, diversify their in
dqstries, enable, local capital to
finance their business, and thus
keep it in the financial control of
the people who have the. great?
est interest in .its success. Fi
nancing industiy is all wrong
the thing, to 4o. with industry is
to run .i^ u.Qdefr "the manager
ftient ojf .peQple, who pwo. it and
Wtio stay on the job.
Make every community as
nearly independent as possible.
The great modern city is an ab
normal development. It tends to
1reak down under i^s own.
weight. It is socially bad and
economically unsound. You. can
see the evidences of this, in the
acute housing problem of cities,
and in the breakdown pf munir
icipfii facilities, especially:'trac
tion? systems."
SURPRISE PARTY
The M. L. Sateren home was
the scene of a surprise party
Friday night. The party was giv
en in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Joa.
ye«lquist»hy^a •umhar of^heir
t,'
.... •.
...-^ v\
I-
\x:
Disarmament and Armistice
Day, declared by national auth-'
ority to be worthy of special
commemoration, will be celebrat
ed in a spirit of reverance and
earnestness... by the Sisseton
Public School next Friday morn
ing. The dash of hilarity and
animal exuberance with wh'V.h
this occasion has become clothed
is regarded as hardly in con
sonance with the memory of the
deceased millions who shed their
life-blood to make the world saf
er for democracy.
Readings, imbued with ster
ling patriotic fervor, will be giv
en and songs, in which America's
ideals are set forth in an unmil
itaristic calm, will be sung by
the High School and Grades'
Glee Clubs. A special symbolic
playlet, in which an impressive
plea is made for disarmament,
has been written, by Ernest:
Kammin for the occaskm and
wfll be presented in elaborate
costumes by the High School
Mr. Morris, whose enthusiastic
speeches during the war- kindled
many hearts with reanimated
loyalty, will deliver an address
on the significance of the
day. A drill and songs will be
given by the grade pupils, after
which there will be a flag salute
by the entire aduience. Musical
numbers will be rendered by Dr.
Sorbel, saxaphonist and Mr.
Hanson, cornetist. i'
In the evening's concert of un
usual merit is promised. Mr.
Carsten Woll, the celebrated ten
or has been secured by Supt.
Thollehaug and an attractive
program of operatic arias and
ballads in English and Scandina
vian songs has been arranged.
Assisting Mr. Woll will be Mrs
Esther Woll, a pianist of recog
nized talent, who will offer se^
lections from the world's master
(composers. These'artists have
made
numerous friends when*
ever they have appeared end it
c^n, Iwtth assurance^ be said
that their progfamt#itt)laahet A
very'nondnal charge^ will''
made to defray the expenses pf
bringing these artists here.
.if?:
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1
('-*V
*i
4
BIG DAY
ARMISTICE DAY ?TO BE
CELEBRATED WITH AP
PROPRIATE EXERCISES
SONGS, READINGS AND
SPECIAL MUSIC WILL
MAKE UP GOOD PROGRAM
WHICH HAS BEEN SPE
CIALLY PRI"P fVRED FOR
THE DAY
V-' "k 'i •«.'-- y'tj
bv.
GOOD FELLOWS GOT
TOGETHER AND LEFT
FOE GAT TAIL LAKE
Dr. C. M. Peterson, Dr Pear
son. of Peever, W. F. Carlberg
anLC. R. Jergenson left Monday
i&ernfolv for a-liliintMg
and will- be gone about: two
weeks. These gentlemen main
tain a club, which they choose
to call Canvas Back Club, on the
shores of Cat Tail Lake, in Mar*
shall county. They said that
most of their shooting would be
done on Champagne peas which
is evidently a .food:
slvfaft N^«aii^jbeUeve them
'vV.':
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BIG BLAZE
A O E N A I
STRUCTURES AND ES
CAPE LEAVING UNIGNIT
ED FUSES IN SEVERAL
OTHER ELEVATORS—DE
PUTY FIRE MARSHAL
QUIGG LEAVES FOR
SCENE
1
BLAZES
OF MORNING
Sioux Falls, Nov. 8.—J. A.
Quigg, deputy state fire mar
shal, left Sioux Falls this noon
for Tripp, where three elevators
were burned at 3 a. m. today and
fuses were found in several oth
ers. Although incendiary was
apparently the cause of the fires,
Mr. Quigg would make no state
ment as to their possible origin.
The loss, which amounts to
$50,000, is almost entirely cov
ered by insurance.
The fires were started by rail
road fuses being thrown into the
grain stored in the buildings. At
least three men are believed to
have taken part in the burning
and they are said to have escap
ed in automobiles following the
raid on the elevators.
The buildings burned belong
to A. Truax of Mitchell, Kayser
and Traux of Mitchell, and the
Farmers' Elevator company of
the first and lastof
ators were in use.
They
were both well filled with grain.
second, buttdlng, wtrich .was
empty, ''^as|'J^n^,^lto this
ground.
Although, every effort liaa,
been made to ascertain tfie iden
tity of the men who ftarted the
fires, nothing has yet been learn
ed of them. ii
Hie Breath
He I can hold my breath two
minutes!
She: You don't say! And it's
pretty strong tonight, fool
Wayside Tales.
WHERE'LL HE GET IT
The head of a tattle iotm
company submits thii,|0ne
to Ca^per^^ Weekly:
fall of .,1090
bought 4$6-headjqf finely,
bred wbitcHTac? sitMor cat.,
ves in the pp«fi. ma^tet^ ai
$85, a
themjBo«d, p^turwi thenx,
all summer and ofi
whit^ U® p^i^fSS ^hfM*
After driving^lhrni
•fown the farmer bo«gM
himself a pair of shoes for
18, a pair for his wife for
$12, a pair for Ms daughter
$9, a pair forhiapon for |6
:afad
4^d.^5 centaa.pmrnd
for a beef roas£,for^Sun
day dinner. Quory-^-Vniere
will his tax money, hie in
tteep^ja^ money frmWp
e^penj^ come trouoiT
And the man who bough(
thecftttlehadtopayashlp-
ing charge of |22t a car
instead of $70, the former
eate.
To quote a onee promi
nent statesman, IThejr get
the fanner cMBaiag aad gftr::
a hi t,
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§3

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