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The Sully County watchman. (Clifton, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-1894, June 25, 1892, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062858/1892-06-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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Pabllpbed Every Saturday,
—AT—
onsriD^L, s. DJSLK:.,
—BY—
J. H. GR0PEN6IESER,
—AT-
$1.50 Per Year in Advance.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF SOLLY COUNTY.
J)R. H. C. PEASE,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON,
ONIDA, 8. D.
Offers his services to the people of Onid* and
Vicinity.
qiHOS. M. CODDARD,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ONIDA, SOUTH DAKOTA
OPTICS—First door South of Court House. 11
John F. Cole,
Has a Complete Stock of
U S
—AND—
PATENT MEDICINES
and Toilet and Fancy Articles.
Also a full line
of
Boots & Shoes
CLOTHING and
Gents' Furnishing Goods.
Glassware and Queensware.
Orders taken and promptly filled for
any article in my line not in stock.
Come and See Me.
Jeft
JOHN P. COLE, Onida, S. D.
TAKEN UP. One fall steer calf
branded 0 or a circle on the right hip,
color red and white. Owner can have
name by proving property and pa}*
iog charges. JAMES STIPE.
N. W. 23-115-18.
Taken Up.
I have taken up and now hold on Sec.
10, 116-74, one black mare pony, about 7
rears old star in forehead, right hind and
fore foot white, branded on left
shoulder. When taken up had on halter
,*fith strap stale, well tiedlup. Owner can
tfcover same by paying for trouble and
advertising. JAMES T.
P.
LAWRENCE.
S, D., May 28, 1892.
Taken Up.
On May 20th, two bay geldings came
into my enclosure, one weight about 900
and 950 lbs. age 5 or 6 years. Owner
4&n have same by calling for them and
paying charges. J. A. LOWERY,
Farmington Township.
O,
Address: Potter, S. D.
W
NOTICE.
All pm^w Are hereby notified to keep
their stock off of the "South-West of
Section 5, Tp. 114, Range 77, (Onida), as
I wish to get the hay this year, which I
cannot do if it is used for a pasture.
Yours Respectfully,
THOS. DONER.
Onida,
S. D.
Herd Notic#.
The undersigned will herd cattle and
horses at his ranch in Harrison town
ship during the season of 1898 at the
following prices
Cattle $1.00 for the season.
Horses 50 cents per month.
Registered Durham Bull in herd.
J. M. LINDLEY.
P. 0, address: Gettysburg, S. D.
CHEAPER AND BETTER.
The St. Paul Pioneer Press has sprung
a pleasant surprise on its large family of
readers by making a great reduction in the
price of its Daily and Sunday editions
when a year's subscription is prepaid.
The new rates are as follnws, payment to
be made strictly in advance: Daily and
Sunday, one year, $8.50 Daily without
Sunday, one year, $7 Sunday only, one
year, $1.50. Ratesfor a less period remain
the same as before. This is a reduction of
from 15 to 25 per cent, and it means a
boom in circulation for the Pioneer Press.
A year's subscription now will carry you
through the Conventions, the Campaign,
the Election and Inauguration. The
Pioneer Press has so materially improved
in the past few months that it is more
than ever the representative Northwestern
paper. Many new features have been
adopted. Among others its Scandinavian
news, to which a column is devoted weekly:
its sporting and horse department, and
much new matter of merit.
Address all orders to THE PIONEER
PRESS CO., St. Paul, Minn.
v, la/
HOME HAPPENINGS.
—The hay crop will be immense this
year.
—H. E. Kimmel made Blunt a visit
Wednesday.
—Ed. Gates returned home Thurs
day evening.
CLOTHING New stock—goods
bargains at French's.
—James Bagby of Grandview spent
Sunday night in town.
—Sheep owners report the
lighter than last year.
—Feed and CORN constantly
hand at Hoffman's store at Blunt.
—The days will now giow shorter.
Wednesday was the longest day.
O—W. B. Day made a trip to Pierre
the first of the week, for M. L. French.
—A large invoice of the latest styles
of ladies hats just received at Hoffman's
—M. B. Knight came over from
Fairbank to spend Sunday with friends
in Onida.
—Miss Maud Cole has returned from
her visit with Miss Mabel Hoover, at
Fairbank.
—Harl Porter closed his school in
the Brooking district Hartford town
ship, yesterday.
—The residents are engaged break
ing fire-guards in the south half of the
township, this week.
—Harl Porter now sports a fine top
carriage, bought of A. A. Faust Girls,
make a note of this.
on
Frank Lillibndge and C. A. Way ot
Pierre spent Saturday and Sunday in
town visiting friends.
—We this week publish the program
for Okobojo celebration.
A
good en­
tertainment is promised.
—Miss Lois Spencer of Kaspar
closed a term of school in the Town
send district, Fairview, last Friday.
—Goods soli cheaper at Hoffman's
in Blunt, than any where west of Chi
cago.
—Next Monday the Civil Township
Boards will meet as a Board of Equal
ization for their respective townships.
—The Sully and Hughes county
W. C. T. Unions expect to hold a joint
convention at Blunt about the middle
of July.
—N. W. Porter and D. M. Smith
spent the first of the week in Potter
county planting trees on the former's
tree claim.
—H. E. Kimmel is putting down a
well on his property in town bought of
Wm. Toomey. He struck water at a
depth of about 77 feet.
—W. B. Day will hold services in
the Green school house, Summit town
ship, on Sunday, July 3rd, instead of
the Center school house.
—Frank Lillibridge and son Glenn,
stopped over in Onida Thursday night.
They were en route to the Cheyenne
Agency to assume charge.
—F. A. Everts and A. Y. Denton ac
companied by Mrs. G. W. and Miss
Carrie Everts visited friends in western
Sully the first of the week.
—M. L. Weed bought a fine team of
mares from Ed. Deffebach, Monday,
and Chas. W. Holmes invested in a
carnage animal at the same time.
—Tomorrow Rev. Clatworthy will
preach in Onida at the usual hours.
This will be his farewell sermon as
pastor of the Church at this place.
—James Ball of Knowlton, Quebec,
father-in-law of N. E. Westover of
Blunt, spent a couple of days in town
this week looking over the country.
—Weather prognosticate Hicks
predicts very warm and dry weather
after this date. We always have
warm weather about this season of the
year.
—G. W. Everts, T. M. Simmons and
A. M. Starks, delegates, left town last
Sunday for the Independent-People's
Party convention held at Redfield
Tuesday.
—Three prairie schooners from Daw
son county,Nebraska, en route to North
Dakota, halted in Onida Saturday
night. The proprietors were named
Foreman.
—Supt. Porter is using every effort
to secure a conductor and make the
Sully county teachers institute, to be
heid some time previous to September
1st, a success.
—We had a nice rain Tuesday night.
At Pierre the rain tell in torrents, ac
companied by hail which did consider
able damage in the way of breaking
window glass.
—L. E. Loomis left for Wessington
Springs,Jerauld county,Tuesday, to at
tend a Free Methodist Camp-meeting.
He will be absent about two weeks.
Miss Lottie Howard will remain with
Mrs. L. during Lucian's absence.
—The ladies of the Onida W. C. T.
U. will meet with Mrs. N. W. Porter
next Tnesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.
All members are requested to attend as
business of importance will be transac
ted.
—A. A. Faust sells the J. 1. Case
Thrashers, McCormick Binders and
Mowers, Randolph Headers, Wagons,
Buggies and Harness. Give him
call. He will order repairs and extras
for any machine made.
—The Fourth of July will be cele
bratedat the Cheyenne Indian Agency,
opposite Forest City. There will be
not less than 2,000 Indians present, it
being ration day. Some in this vicin
ity talk of going to witness the feast.
—The annual school election in this
township, Tuesday, passed off very
quietly, in fact a large number of our
people had forgotten all about it.
Thomas Brown was re-elected chair
man of the Board by a majority of 21
votes A number of ladies exercised
their right of franchise.
—The largest judgment ever docket
ed in Sully county was filed with the
Clerk of Courts last Saturday. The
amount is $45,564.25 and is in favor of
the North American Loan and Trust
Co. and against the Colonial and
United States Mortgage Co. The
judgment was docketed in 39 counties
in the State.
4th AT OKOBOJO.
The following is the program of the day:
National salute Sun rise.
Calathumpian Parade 10 a. m.
Prayer, Rev. Ash 11 a, m.
Song, "America," by the audience.
Reading Declaration of Independence.
Dinner, 15
OUT-DOOR SPORTS,
2 p.
Sack Race, .Prize,
$1
Second prize 50.
Horse race, first prize, 5 00.
see'd 3 00.
Baloon Ascension.
Dance, beginning at 8 p. m. Good music.
All are cordially invited to come and help
celebrate the "Glorious 4th of July."
By order of Committee.
J. W. GLESSNER, A. ERB,
Secretary. Chairman.
GOODWATER.
Crops never looked finer in this sec
tion.
Mrs. Y. A. McFall finished a suc
cessful term of school with a picnic
Friday, June 24.
Mrs. Hyde who has been seriously
ill for several days is now able to be
about some again.
J. B. McGinnis has been trading
horses again, as has also F. Goddard,
Frank returned from Hughes Co.,where
he has been shearing a large flock of
sheep the property of Mr. S. S. Clough.
—R. Clark has turned his house
around so it faces the South and ex
pects building an addition to it.
Joe Lovett of Summit has moved
his house to the Strand farm in Iowa
township, where he will reside in the
future.
There was a full house at the God
dard school house, to preaching and
Sunday School last Sabbath, at 10.30
and 11 A. M. CHSS#.
BEAYTCN.
J. F. Gunsalus is digging a well in
his horse pasture.
Andrew Nelson brought down 35
yearlings lately. He now has 150 head
of which 125 are yearling steers.
We need rain now to keep our wheat
booming.
Our hay men are getting ready to
cut plenty of feed. New mowers, new
raked and one new stacking outfit will
fix them up in good shape, and they
will begin next week.
We had a very enthusiastic and hot
ly contested school election today, re
sulting in the selection of J. F. Gunsal
us for Treasurer and D. W. Bushnell
for Chairman. 22 votes were cast, 7
of which were by ladies. They were
all present at once and had a pleasant
time, including a horse race for pas
time. They also recommended a full
set of officers for our civil township
and asked to have it christened "Lawn.''
Wonder what made Gee Whiz look so
sober at the Ghost Dance? Was he
atraid some good Republican would
get after his war-lock with a coon skin
and bottle of hard cider? Tell him we
are waiting for him to analyze that
platform of ours. After he gets it well
analyzed with his green goggles on (no
use for him to look at it with naked
eyes, for he cant see any monsters of
oppression in it that way) ask him if
he would add or subtract aught from
it. You know we must have hisopin.
ion on it before we will dare to go be
fore the people with it.
AMERICAN.
nllu Counts tiOatchman.
VOLUME X. ONIDA, SULLY COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA, SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1892. NUMBER 11.
00.
Slow Mule Race, 100,
Tub Race 1 00.
Greased-pig Race, Prize, the pig.
Foot Race, boys under 14 1 00.
MORTON.
D. A. Arnold is through shearing
sheep.
Turley will celebrate the 4th in fine
shape.
Pete Anderson and others still con
tinue to break prairie.
News very scarce this week.
PROXY.
CASTLEWOOD, S. D., Dec. 1,1891.
—Received of the Watertown Hail
Indemnity Association $506 in full for
loss No. 552, sustained season of 1891,
I was promptly and fairly adjusted.
Many of my neighbors who met with
loss and were not insured thought I
would not get it all. I told them to
wait and see. I am well pleased with
the treatment received from the W. H.
I. A. Wm. NEVENHEIM.
The 4th at Turley.
Fourth of July celebration to be Jheld
at the Turley school house, Rich Valley
township:
Declaration of Independence, by Miss
Reno Livingstone.
Speeches by Messrs. Low and Bogard.
Oration by Attorney Simmons.
Music by Prof. Gates and the Goddard
and Spencer families.
The programme will be lengthened by
recitations and other exercises suitable to
the occasion.
Stands for the sale of ice-cream, lemon
ade, candies, etc., will help pay the ex
penses of the day.
Bring basket dinner.
All are cordially invited.
Dance in the evening.
COM.
—On Saturday, June 25th, Mrs.
Fred Comstock of Ney, will be in Onida
to give instructions in dress-cutting
and fitting. Mrs. Comstock also has a
fine chart she is selling, and invites the
ladies to call on her at the Onida House.
•O
The Farmers' Alliance was origin
ally helpful to the agricultural class,
and it had a large and growing in
fluence with our legislators and the
Republicna party, but in an evil hour it
listened to the advice of its unprinci
pled leaders who aimed at nothing
more than increased salaries and hon
ors for themselves and who promised
impossible benefits and, who, on behalf
of the farmers made the several im
possible and idiotic demands on the
grand old party. Knowing them to be
impossibilities and if possible not ben*
eficial, the Republican party refused
to consider them. Thus the Alliance
was pursuaded to turn itself into a po
litical machine and an open enemy ot
that party whose total record is a bene
fit to the producers. With its perfect
organization and ample revenues, and
little time tor discussion, it came near
capturing the executive departments
of several North-Western States but
it missed its mark in all of them,
Now nearly two years ot discussion
has followed and the foolishness of
their demands are shown and the de
ception and rascality of the leaders is
exposed. They and their patent reme
dies have been weighed and found want
ing. As the natural result the party is
weakening. That part which they are
still pleased to call the Alliance is
nearly broken up. Their pumping
machines are no longer workable.
Their revenues are reduced and they
are making pitiful appeals for direct
contributions. In Kansas they offer to
pool their interests with the Democrats.
In Minnesota they are broken into
hopeless factions. In this State $
part of the leaders are courting Demo*
cratic aid. They and all well informed
persons know that the party has passed
the meridian of its greatness. Hoping
yet to save their rotten float and like
drowning men that catch at straws, an(|
not caring for their principles as ad
vocated from the first, except as a
means of party success, Loucks and
some others have recently advocated
the throwing overboard of all their for*
mer dearly cherished planks save on$
and the editor of the Onida Journal,
who can advocate one thing this week
and denounces it in the following issue,
has promised to assist. He will also
probably try to dump Loucks with the
rest of the rubbish. Go in Gee Whiz,
neither of you can do the other any
political hurt. You are both past that
and emetics cannot save the party nor
can disinfectants sweeten the vicinity
of its carcass.
EUGENE 3TEERE,
A
ONIDA,
Gov. W. E. Russell,
OF MASSACHUSETTS, WILL BK
Next President
If he gets nominated by the Democratic Convention and receives more votes
than the Republican Nominee.
We Are Elected
By the people of Pierre and vicinity to furnish them during the Spring and
Summer with CLOTHING and FURNISHING GOODS.
We Have Elected
To do this—and promise by the moon (not the "inconstant moon") and by
yonder elm (not slippery elm) to do it satisfactorily.
We Have Defeated
All competitors in our contest for public favor. We thank you all for good
will and hope to greet thousands at our counters during the next few weeks.
PRESIDENT.
J, D. fLlXdG-iyjfcC & CO.)
The Clothiers of Pierre.
W. W. WAITE,
VICE-PRESIDENT.
(INCORPORATED,)
ONIDA,
SOUTH DAKOTA,
DOES A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC EXCHANGE BO TJGSI
AND SOLD.
Collections Promptly Made and Remitted.
BABGAI
A GOOD STOCK
•V:
W. N. MELOON.
CASHIER.
OF
Canned goods and Dried fruits,
OurTT are Choicest.
GERMAN SOX Reduced Priees.
But You'll Always Find Us Here Heady to Supply You
Witli the Best Grades of Dry Goods, Groceries,
Hardware, Queensware, and almost Any
thing You Want at
BOTTOM PBIOES.
IKE.
W. N. MELOON,
BSAL ESTAT
"AlsTiD?—*
IVSUBABCI
Title Examination
FRENCH.
1M.
i
SOUTH DAKOTA,
a
Specialty.
I have the Only Abstracts in Sully County.
1
i
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