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The Sully County watchman. (Clifton, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-1894, August 04, 1893, Image 1

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Published Every Friday,
—AT—
OSTTXXA.. S. IDJaJBZ-*
—BY—
J. H. GF0PEN6IESER,
—AT—
91 50 Per Year in Advance.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF SOLLY COUNTY.
X)R. H. C.
PEA8E,
•PHYSICIAN & SURGEON,
ONIDA, 8. D.
Offers MB services to the people of Onida and
vicinity.
•pHOS. M. CODDARO.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ONIDA, SOUTH DAKOTA
OrflCl—First door South of Court House. 11
•fP#"
250 Sheep for Sale.
1 have 250 Merino Ewes and Lambs
that are for sale cheap, on time. Call
and see them.
CHARLES KARRACK.
Rich Valley Tp. Turley Post-OfRee.
TSACfiSBS' INSTITUTE.
FlR8T DAY.
Pursuant to call of Superintendent Mrs.
V. M. McFall, the Eighth Annual Sully
County Teachers' Institute met at Onida,
July 31, 1898.
Institute was opened with a song from
Gospel Hymne No. P, Miss Adele Nilson
at the organ. This was followed by
Scripture Reading by Mrs. McFall, and
the work of the Institute was begun.
The first exercise on the Program was
Arithmatic, conducted by Mr. Porter.
Orthography, conducted by Mr. H. D.
Enoe, was next taken up.
After recess Mr. Porter conducted a les
son in Civil Government, followed by# a
Geography lesson on South Dakota, in
volving much of the early history of the
State, by Mr. Enoe.
Twenty-nine teachers, all showing an
earnest interest in their work, were en
rolled during the forenoon.
At 12 the Instute adjourned.
At 150 p. m. the work was again taken
up according to program, with an earnest
effort on the part of the instructors to
make the Institute a success.
Mrs. McFall conducted the Grammar
lesson and Mr. Porter the physiology.
After recess the Course of Study and
Reading was taken up by Mrs. McFall,
who afterwards spoke of the Reading
Circle work for the coming year, after
which the Institute adjourned,
AUGUST 1.—2nd DAT.
Institute opened with song and Scrip
ture Reading, followed by Roll Call, with
response by Quotations-
Three new members were enrolled, and
the work began according to program.
Arithmetic was conducted by Mr. Por
ter—subject: Terms and signs used in
teaching the fundamental rules,
Orthography was conducted by Mr.
Enoe.
After recess History, beginning with
Tyler's administration, was conducted by
Mrs. McFall, and the Counties of South
Dakota, were taken up by Mr. Enoe for
the Geography lesson.
AFTERNOON.
Institute opened with song
and
roll call,
with response by number.
The subject for the Grammar lesson was
The Adverb, conducted by Mrs. McFall.
Mr. Porter conducted the Physiology
lesson on the nervous system.
After recess the Course of Study was
again taken up by Mrs. McFall.
Mr. Porter next opened the Question
Box, which proved of much interest. The
questions were instructive and well
chosen.
Institute adjourned.
AUGUST 2,1893.
The Institute reconvened at 9
was
a.
m. and
opened with song and Scripture
Reading.
The Arithmetic was conducted by Mr.
Porter.
Orthography by Mr. Enoe—5 words
were analyzed.
After recess Mr. Porter conducted a les
son in Civil Government.
Mr. Enoe conducted the Geogarphy on
the cities and County Seats of South Da
kota and the Institute adjourned.
At 1:30 p. m., the teachers again as
sembled and all but one responded to
r°After
a song Mrs. McFall conducted the
Grammar lesson: subject, the Verb.
Mr. Porter conducted the Physiology
lesson on the Sympathetic Nervous Sys
tem.
After recess Mrs. McFall took up the
Course of Study and Reading. The im
portance of using the Course of Study in
the county schools was strongly impress
ed upon the teachers. The time has ar
rived when every teacher is required to
use the course of study in order to comply
with the requirements of the State in mak
ing reports of the school year and its
work.
Mrs. McFall also opened the question
box and spoke approvingly of the interest
manifested by the teachers in all their
work as shown by the large number of
questions propounded. A large number
were left over for another session.
At 4:80 p. m. the institute adjourned.
NAMES ENROLLED.
Ohas. Olessner,
y. M. McFall,
J.M- Porter,
H. D. Enoe,
Minnie Porter,
Harl Porter,
Myrtle McGannon,
Joeie Groseclose,
Emma Nelson,
Ben a Groseclose,
J. N. McOray,
Aftle Uayiiea,
Louie Haverley,
Hannah Anderson,
Susie Hardman,
Jennie Livingstone,
Adele Nelson,
Mfulw- Gleaner,
Martha Bunch,
Lillio Collins,
Jessie Livingstone,
Minnie Livingstone,
Ada Carpenter,
Mabel Finch,
Karl McLaughlin,
Claud Garner,
Frank Porter,
Albert Toomey,
Annie Livingstone,
Otto Brouer,
Ida Faust,
Kftte&ane,
HOME HAPPENINGS.
•Harvest time.
Oats are now rapidly ripening.
A. A. Faust sold two headers
Monday.
—Thos. D. Huie of Troy was a call
er Monday,
—Pierre is to have another circus
next Monday.
—Mrs. J. T. Yoder of Morton spent
Sunday in the city.
—Green Rubel of Pleasant did busi
ness in town Monday.
L. B. Matusch of Blaine is erect
inga large barn on his farm.
—Miss Susie Thorp of Laurel was
in town on legal business, Monday.
Mrs. John Hardman of Cora town
ship, was a visitor in Onida Monday.
—Frank Sedgwick of Farmington
was down and bought a header Mon
day.
—The west end of the county is the
best represented in the county insti
tute.
—Cal. Barber spent Sunday visiting
his friend Chas. W. Johnson in Mil
ford.
Miss Louise Merrick spent part
of this week visiting friends at Fair
bank.
—Tommy Weed has invested in
some bronchoes for Tommy, Jr., to
break.
Mrs. L. L. Johnston of Fairbank
was in town transacting legal business,
Monday.
Misses Katie and Susie Matusch
left for their home at Redfield last
Saturday.
—Charlie Green of Okobojo is now
driving stage for his father, between
Onida and Blunt.
—Mrs. Dr. H. G. Pease was quite
ill the first of the week, but is now
rapidly improving.
M. L. French and wife spent a
couple of days in Pierre this week, re
turning Tuesday evening.
—W. R. Stowe, representing the
Rockford Overall Co., was interview
ing our merchants Tuesday.
—What is the use in wearing poor
dress goods when you can buy Satines
for 8c. per yard at Temmy's,
The Journal has the contract to
print the stationery for the Executive
Committee of the People's party.
—Thos. Brown has removed his
dwelling house to hi9 homestead, on
S. E. of Sec. 17, this township.
—Master Harry Brown of Pierre is
spending a few days with his grand
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brown
of this township.
—Mrs. Fred Bonsey and son, An
drew, of Pierre, is visiting her uncle
and aunt, Mr. and Mm. A. McFall of
Clifton township.
-Born, on Sunday morning, July
30,1893, to Mr. and Mrs. Thos. E.
Weed, of Fairbank township, a son
The WATCHMAN congratulates.
-A daughter of Newell McGeorge
of Pierre has been quite sick at the
home of C. Eckert on the R. B. Cod
dington farm, in Lincoln township.
-Mrs. J. W. Carpenter of East
Pierre spent Tuesday in town visiting
friends. She brought her daughter
Miss Ada, up to attend the Institute
—Otto Brouer of Bert county, Ne
braska, arrived Saturday for a visit
with his friend Clerk Enoe and to look
over the country with a view ot locat
ing.
—Knute C. Lomheim, who is now
engaged at the barber business in Ha
ron, has been spending part of the
week here looking after his property
interests.
—We understand that D. W. Bush
nell of Buffalo township is one ofGro
ver Cleveland's pension victims, he
being one of the several thousand sus
pended pensioners.
Dan M. Smith returned home
from Iowa Monday night atter a weeks
absence. We understand that he pur
chased a stock of clothing and gents
furnishing goods while away.
—Frank Ripley, of Hartford, L.
Crumbaker, of Farmington and Tom
Towle of Troy, were doing business in
town Tuesday. The latter bought
new McCormick mower from A. A
FauiSt.
Sully county and South Dakota
seem to be in as good condition as any
of the States. Reports from Indiana
Illinois and other States announce that
the crops are being dried up by the
continued drouth. We are having
nice growing weather and some of the
farmers state that their wheat promises
better than ever before, while corn was
never better.
VOLUME XI. ONIDA, SULLY COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1893,
—Christian Keuhl, a German resid
ing in Garner township, was quite bad
ly bruised up about the shoulders, head
and face last Thursday in a runaway
accident. He is now able to be out
again.
—Benj. Boice of Troy township last
week removed with his family to the
Moreau river country, on the reserva
tion, northwest of Forest City, where
he will go into the stock business with
his brother-in-law, George Darland.
-The members of the Onida Equal
Suffrage Club of 1890, are requested to
meet at the residence of Mrs. Elizabeth
G. Kimmel, for the purpose of tran
sacting some E. S. A. business, on
Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock sharp.
By order of COMMITTEE.
A Flag Pole entertainment will be held
at the courthouse in Onida on Thursday
evening, August 10th, 1893, for the pur
pose of raising funds to purchase an organ
to be placed in the Baptist church, to be
erected in Onida. Admission 26c. Chil
dren 10c. Ice Cream and Cake will be
served after the entertainment. Every
body invited.
—Quite a number of the members and
friends of the W. C. T. U. gathered at the
home of Mrs. E. E. Brooking on Thursdav
afternoon of last week. Some matters of
business were brought before the Union
and six new members were admitted, af
ter which refreshments were served and a
pleasant time was enjoyed by all. The
next meeting will be held at Mrs. E. Bar
ber's Thursday, Aug. 10.
—J. S. Wells of Laurel, Iowa, fath
er of J. W. Wells, who recently pur
chased B. P. Hoover's ranch at Fair
bank, spent a few days here looking
over the country during the past week.
He is quite well pleased with the coun
try and will return in a few days with
brood mares to be placed on his son's
ranch.
—Remember I am selling the old reli
able McCormick Mower. You can have
the sickle edged plate or smooth plate.
FAUST.
Literary Entertainment
Program for Institute
Literary, Tues­
day evening, Aug. 8th, 1893.
Music, Band.
Address of Welcome, Mrs. E. G. Kimmal.
Response, Supt. V. M. McFall.
Solo, Prof. Gates.
Recitation, Miss Minnie Porter.
Reading, Miss
Attte
Hayncs.
Music, Miss Adele Nilson.
Recitation, Miss Madge Ulessner.
Essay, H. D. Enoe.
Cornet Duett, Chas. Glessner and C. R. Garner.
Recitation, Misx Martha Bunch.
Recitation, Miss Josie OrosecloM.
Music.
Recitation, Mies Myrtle McGannon.
Reading, Miss Hannah Anderson.
Mueic.
Paper, R. H. Porter,
Music.
President W. M. Blackburn of the
Pierre University, will lecture before the
the Teachers' Institute on Monday Even
ing next, Aug. 7th.
The Artesian Well.
[Pierre Capital.]
The time has come when every citi
zen of Pierre may make all the wild
statements he pleases about the won
derful features of the artesian well, and
even then he cannot do the matter jus
tice. In many ways it is the most
wonderful well in the world. It is the
only well whose water will apparently
burn. Prof. Wright of Waterville,
New York, has been examining the well
for several days and at every step has
been surprised. He has found that
780 gallons of water flow per minute
from it, that 24,000 cubic feet of gas
escape daily and that the temperature
is 100 degrees. The analysis of the
water as made by Prof. Sheppard of
the agricultural college, show it to con
tain wonderful medical properties.
That it has cured several cases of rheu
matism we know, and invalids of all
descriptions have improved while tak
ing baths. Let us not keep our light
under a bushel any longer. The world
should know of this well and of the
great benefits it can give the sick.
BEFORE the issue of the next WATCH
MAN Cleveland's "my Congress," will
meet to wrangle over the finance ques
tion. There will be red hot fun down
there and lots of it, and Cleveland will
find where he is at.
It is noticeable that Democratic
Congressmen, particularly those who
are prominent enough to be classed as
leaders are modifying their talk about
the nature of the tariff bill to be pass
ed by Congress. They say that the
revenues of the country will not justify
as great a reduction as was at first con
templated. But this is only to give a
plausible excuse for their change of
position toward the tariff.
THE Aberdeen Star (Independent)
is the only paper in the state that com
mends Gov. Altgeld tor granting a par
don to the imprisoned anarctists.—
Vermillion Republican.
IT also enjoys the proud distinction
of being the only paper in the known
world that has offered up a prayer for
another season of bad crops in South
Dakota, on the theory that prosperity
is a bad thing.—Mitchell Republican
Republican Mass Convention.
The Republicans of Sully County are
hereby called to meet in Mass Convention
at Onida. on Saturday, September 9th,
1898, at 2 o'olock p. m., for the purpose
of selecting five delegates to represent
Sully County in the State Convention to
be held at Huron on Wednesday, Septem
ber 20th, 1893, for the purpose of nomin
ating three candidates for the office of
Judge of the Supreme Court of South
Dakota.
Dated Onida, 8. D., August 27, 1893.
By order of County Executive Com
mittee.
J. H.
GROPENGIBSER,
Chairman.
W. N. MBLOON, Secretary.
THE St. Paul Globe says: If Siam
thinks France can be scared away by
noise Uncle Sam will donate a few
Populists to its service.
"DAKOTA never had a poorer pros
pect for a grand harvest. Tell the
truth gentlemen, a lie will not change
the visible conditions," says the Onida
Journal, which is rather hard on the
popo real estate speculators of this
vicinity.
On July 1st, 1893, there Was In the
country $695,000,000 in gold coin.
On July 1, 1893, there was only $513,
000,000 a loss of $182,000,000 in three
years of our best currency basis. How
long at this rate will it tatce to run out
all the gold and leave in its place a
single silver standard
JUDGE Andrews, of Brookings, in
structed the grand jury at Watertown
to treat the city council which had
adopted a "license ordinance" as equal
ly guilty with the saloon keeper. The
judge is eminently sound on this point.
Officials who violate laws are even
more guilty than ordinary violators of
the statutes of our state. The Nevts
commends the action of Judge And
rews in this direction, to all our cir
cuit judges.—Canton News.
Democrats say they cannot be blam
ed for the present condition of affairs,
because all laws are still republican
laws, although the power to administer
tbem lies with the democrats. Nobody
is kicking on the laws, even the dems.
stopping that after election. The
country was prosperous with these
same laws under republican rule but
now under the democratic promises to
change these laws, the people are dis
trustful, hence the present condition of
affairs after four brief months of
mocracy.
THE most recent effusion from Sen
ator Stewart is: "The destruction of
silver by the repeal of the Sherman act
will destroy more than half of the ba
sis of circulation and credit Prior to
the election of Cleveland the Honor
able Senator and our neighborover the
way were cursing the Republican party
because they had already demonetized
silver and destroyed over half the ba
sis of circulation." Now the drule
comes from the other corner of their
mouths: "The distruction of the Sher
man
act (Republican legislation) will,"
etc. And thus they whoop'er up for
the retention of Republican legislation
as the only barrier to the greatest cal
amity of modern times. Too late now
to tell the truth, gentlamen, and have
it do any good. You voted for Weav
er to elect Cleveland. Eat your crow
and shut up.
WHAT London is to the world New
York city or Wall Street is to this na
tion. Its our largest export and im
port city the largest dealer in stocks
and bonds the greatest commercial
center, and the clearing house of the
nation and though time may change
the location its counter-part will re
main. There one may buj' or sell at
a moment's notice anything haying
quotable prices, and the business is
just as honorable and beneficial as any
other. It's a necessity born of the
needs of commerce and will hold forth
somewhere the same as a couuty seat
or town hall or school house center.
The monster business ot Wall Street
necessarily requires an immense ag
gregation of capital to do its work and
hence the men having such capital con
gregate there, but they have no greater
per cent, of influence or control of the
money of the country than any other
number of men having an equal
amount of capital, wherever located
Whatever the kind or quality of the
money used Wall Street will have its
share of, and control of, and no more.
The inventiveness of the Weaver
Loucks crowd cannot produce a money
of which Wall Street cannot control its
share as easy as now, and any finan
cial policy calculated to injure the Wall
Street denizens will injure every other
man as well. The men who are fig'
ing Wall Street are as insane as the
man who touches off a powder uiaga
zine with a match to blow up another
man.
i I
m8
Onida,
to alcljiimn.
L. A. TEMMEY,
1* A. TEMJIEY
Has just returned from the East with the Finest Lot of
DRESS GOODS, LININGS, SHEETING, CLOTHING, BOOTS & SHOES
in fact everything in the Dry Goods line that he will sell from
B0 to 50 per cent. Below Cost for Gash for the Next 80 Days?
Go and See Him.
$
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S.D
NUMBER 16.
Onida, S. B.
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I haye just received a Car Load of Farm Implements,
consisting of
The Old Reliable McCormick Mowers and Hay Rakes.
The Light-Running all Steel Craver Headers,
Gang and Walking Plows,
Buggies and Carts,
and everything you may want, which I will sell at
Low Prices and terms to suit purchasers.
A® A. FAUST,
HEAR YE!
00 TO THE
BAB0ADT STO
And buy Goods at
Reduced Prices for Cash
Cut Prices on Nearly Everything. Now is Tour Time to
BUY CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, HARDWARE
and MOST GROCERIES.
o
3
a
o
"3 flk
Farm Machinery
By the CAR LOAD.
O
ONIDA, S. D.
M. I*. FRENCH-
W. N. MELOON,
ivsvBiies,
-JLNJD-
ONIDA, SOUTH DAKOTA.
Title Examination Specialty.
I have the Only Abstracts in Sully County.

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