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The Sully County watchman. (Clifton, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-1894, October 27, 1893, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99062858/1893-10-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Published Every Friday,
—AT—
OUsTIUD-A-, s. ID^JSZ
-BY—
J. B. GROPENGIESER,
-AT—
$1.50 Per Year in Advance.
OFFICIAL PAPER OF SULLY COUNTY.
DR. H. C. PEASE,
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON,'
ONIDA, 8. D.
Offers his services to the people of Onida and
vicinity.
THOS. M. CODDARD.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ONIDA, SOUTH DAKOTA.
OFFICE—First
door South of Court House. 11
NOTICX.
All those knowing themselves in
debted to me will please settle by Nov.
1st, as I have some obligations to meet
at that time, and oblige.
S. W. GATES.
A. A. Faust has put in a stock of Flour,
all grades, and wants you to call and get
bis.
prices.
Teacher's Examination.
The next regular examination for
teachers will be held at Onida, Friday
Nov. 3rd, 1893. This is the last ex
amination until March, 1894.
V. M. MCFALL, Co. Supt.
Notice.
AH persons knowing themselves to
be indebted to me either by note or
book account will please call and set
tle on or before November 1st, 1893,
as I must have the money by that
date. J. F. COLE.
Onida, 8 D, Oct 3,1893.
Watertown Flour.
I am now handling the fine grade
Watertown Flour. Call and get a
sack and try it. THOS. DONEB.
TAKE"
NOTICEP
We keep constantly on hand a full
line of Undertakers' Goods, all prices,
at Blunt, S. Dak.
CAPITAL CITY FURNITURE Co.
20.tf AMOS WILEY, Manager.
—If you need a Fanning Mill you
can get one at cost from me.
Tread not
FAUST.
Sheep for Sale.
1 have 200 sheep for sale at $2.25
per head. Call at Sec. 34-116-76, or
write me at Turley, S. D.
24 PATRICK KAIIB.
960 Sheep for Sale.
1 have 250 Merino Ewes and Lambs
that are for sale cheap, on time. Qa.ll
and see them.
CHARLES KARRACH.
Rich Valley Tp. Turley Post-office.
—You will need repairs for your
Stove. 1 will get them for you on
short notice or if you are in need of a
new stove, come and see me.
in one
ing.
In
W
"iiisf
FAUST,
ALL FEET
shoe,,—goes the
old
say­
other words, it takes
an
infinite
variety of styles, sizes, qualities, makes
and prices to suit all. Hence, it is worth
something to know that when you go to
a store you'll be suited. We meet that
demand and meet it thoroughly. We can
not only give you what you want but we
can give you bargains, too. This is the
season for shoes. Most firms would stiffen
prices on that account. More the sales
more we cut.
At John KlelwaPg
BOOT AND SHOE STORE.
Pierre Street, Pierre, S.
D.
HOME HAPPENINGS.
—Rev. M. Ash arrived yesterday.
—John Bradley of Okobojo talks of
locating at Lewiston.
—J. H. Van Saun of Pierre spent
Saturday night town.
—John and Ed. Toomey fisited
Bluut "chums," Sunday.
—Misses Louise and Mabel Merrick
are visiting friends in Pierre.
—A rain, sleet and snow stoft^ V^sit
de these parts Monday morning.
—Lilburn Crumbaker was over from
the west side Wednesday on business.
—Al. Buck and Geo. Ripley, from
northwestern Sully, were callers Tues
day afternoon.
—Albert Toomey is the happy pos
sessor of a new extention shoe and has
laid aside his crutches.
—C. L, Howard of Marston has ac
cepted a position for the winter in R.
W. Beebe's store, at Blunt.
—Don't forget the supper at the
Court House next Monday evening.
Everybody should assist in supporting
the ministers.
—Mr. and Mrs. Mark Todd of Pot
tet post-office have "pulled up stakes"
and removed to Tennessee where they
formerly resided.
—Geo. Weischedel and wife of Pearl
township, and a party of Pierreites,
have recently returned from a pleasure
trip through the Black Hills country.
—Cal. Barber of Onida, and Hon.
David Hall and wife of Ney, returned
home from the Worlds Fair last Thurs
day night. They all enjoyed the big
show.
—L. A. Temmey gave a "Turkey
shoot" last Saturday afternoon. All
present seemed to enjoy the sport.
Another "shoot" mil be arranged for
soon.
—Mr. and Mrs. Edward Barber
spent a couple of days at the Forest
City Agency, guests of Hon. Frank
Lillibridge and family, returning home
Tuesday.
—Harvey C. Mills, W&© has been a
resident of Norfolk and Fairview town
ships during the past eight years, de
parted for the east with his family
Tuesday, to remain permanently.
—Mr. and Mrs. I. E. Earnest of
Goodwater township, are the happy
parents of a nice little boy, their first
born. The WATCHMAN extends con
gratulations. The young man arrived
on the 16th inst.
—Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Johnson of
Laurel, have gone to the Worlds Fair,
and expect to spend the winter in the
east. During their absence Mr. and
Mrs. Traverse Wilson will have charge
of the store and post-office.
—It is reported that L.
M.
Burk-
holder of Western Sully, died at the
Military Hospital in Fort Sully last
week of paralysis. Mr. Burkholder
was well known in Western Sully hav
ing located there in the spring of 1884.
—There is no place like South Da
kota, especially Sully county. Traverse
Wilson and wife of Troy township, af
ter spending a couple of years on the
Pacific coast recently returned, well
satisfied that "there is no place like
home" in Sully county. The WATCH
MAN and their many friends gladly
welcome them back.
—Mrs. J. B. Gleason has been hired
by the school board of Buffalo twp. to
teach school in that district, the school
being held at her home and the only
pupil being her own child The twp.
has two other schools but they are too
far away. Under the wise provisions
of the Dakota school law no child need
grow up without instruction.—blunt
Advocate.
—Wm. Gothmann of Garner town
ship, sold his personal property at auc
tion Tuesday. Sale was well attended
and everything brought good ^prices.
Mr. Gothmann will at once remove to
Fort Sully and accept the position of
post blacksmith. While we regret to
lose Mr. G. and his family from this
vicinity we are pleased to know that
he will still reside in the county.
nil County
SOCIAL AND SUPPER
At the Court House, Onida,
—on—
Monday Evening, October 30th.
A social and supper will be given
at the Court House on Monday even
ing, Oct. 30th, for the benefit of the
pastor of the M. E. Church. Every
body is earnestly requested to bring
baskets well filled. A general good
time is promised. Supper from 7:30
to 9:30. Adults will be charge#r£5
cents and children 15 cents for a good
supper. Music by the Onida Band.
Let everybody come.
QUAETERLY MEETING.
He Free Methodist Quarterly Meet
ing will be held by Rev. C. H. Sage, at
at Milford Nov. 3rd to 5th, as follows:
Preaching service each night at 7
o'clock and Saturday afternoon at 2
o'clock. The regular Q. M. services
Sunday, commencing 9:30, a. m. We
are anticipating a good time.
Come to the Gosple feast.
W. C. MEACHAM.
G00DWATE3.
Mrs. T. M. and Frank Goddard and
Mrs. G. L. McGinnis started east on
a visit, Wednesday morning, and will
take in the fair en route.
S. G. W. Stokes is back again.
Miss Ollie Taylor is learning to draw
sweet music from the violin.
E. A. Lawrence is drawing his crop
of hay to the Pierre market.
Grouse are very plentiful and tame
in these parts this fall.
Robert Clark and G. L. McGinnis
are expected home this week.
CHESS.
East Stilly Items.
fReceived too late for last issue.]
Farmers are busy finishing thresh
ing.
Jacob Houck is at present in Kings
ley, Iowa.
Mrs. W. H. Reed and son, Harry,
are visiting with friends in Aberdeen.
School in Norfolk is progressing
finely under under the supervision of
Lois Spencer. Eighteen pupils are in
attendance.
Preaching services are held every
alternate Sunday evening in Norfolk.
Next date of service is October 29th at
4 o'clock p. m.
Walter Spencer spent Sunday with
Chas. Gray and family, in Hyde county.
Del. Arnold made a business trip to
Kaspar and Cora township last week.
Chas. Brown of Orient was in East
ern Sully last week, in search of stray
horses. He found them near Blunt.
L. M.
DENTISTRY.
Dr. F. O. Sale, Dentist, will again
be in Gettysburg on Tuesday, Wed
nesday and Thursday, Nov. 21,22 and
23, prepared to do Dental Work of all
kinds. Remember the dates.
—N. R. Thompson was hanged at
DeSmet last Friday for the murder of
Mrs. E. J. Bliton at Arlington, in
Kingsbury, on July 4, 1892. This is
the second hanging that has occurred
in the state, the first being a man
named Lehman in the Black Hills.
THE only question in Ohio now is
the size of Governor McKinley's ma
jority.
On May 11th, 1893, the Legislature
of Florida adopted in substance the
following: Whereas, The production
of the pine-apple is rapidly assuming
proportions of magnitude in the semi
tropical portions of the United States
and the territory adapted to its growth
is sufficient to supply the demand, and
our people cannot compete with ior
eign producers who have the advant
age of cheaper labor, be it resolved
by the Legislature: "That our Rep
resentatives in Congress be requested
to secure the passage of a law impos
inga duty of $2 per barrel on all for
eign pine-apples."., That is good re
publican doctrine, and as soon as
the cheap money smudge has passed
away in the South, protection will be
come an issue all the southern
states.
Ws
VOLUME XI. ONIDA, SULLY COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1893. NUMBER 88.
GOING TO KANSAS.
The Alliance Association, a life in
surance organization with headquarters
at Huron, will shortly be removed to
Topeka, Kansas. This step will neces
sitate the removal to Topeka of Alonzo
Wardall, sometimes called "Alonzo,
the Great,'' and S. D. Cooley, both of
whom have been connected with the
association since at early day. Z. D.
Scott, at one time a Populist senator
from Grant county, is also connected
with the company in an official way
but has not as yet perfected his plans
for the future.
This change of base would seem to
indicate two things, viz: That the Aid
association has found the picking very
poor in South Dakota with the pros
pects for the future decidedly dubious,
and that the Alliance is gradually
abandoning the state instead of rely
ing upon it, as in the past, as one of
its great battle grounds and stamping
fields in the union of states. Kansas,
on the other hand, has been recognized
for some time as the hot bed of the
Populistic doctrine and movement,
and if the Alliance Aid and kindred
organizations cannot flourish there
they are indeed marked for an early
demise. Topeka and Kansas certainly
promise an enlarged and partially un
worked field for Wardall's "Helping
Hand" and unlimited surplus of gall.
—Ex.
HEADQUARTERS
Of A CHILLING BLIGHT
Field Marshal General Starvation Com
manding the Army of Laborinng Men
and Farmers Thai Voted for the
"Change"
SIB:
I
have the honor to report that in ac
cordance with General Orders No. 1, is
sued from your office August 15th, 1892,
I did, with the assistance of my officers,
(especially selected for the work), make
requisition upon the laboring men and
farmers of the country for their political
support for the nominees of the Democrat
ic party in the campaign of 1892.
The response was most enthusiastic and
the result of the election fully demons
trated the wisdom of your order, for
Cleveland and reform went through
with a whirl, and now that the "change"
has been fully|accomplished, and the re
sults are before us. I desire to make my
final report and receive my discharge
from the duties then assigned me.
In viewing the results of that election,
I am compelled to admit that we accom
plish even more than was expected, and
some of them are enumerated, to show
that we are strictly "in it."
1st. Our political enemy, the G. O. P.
were completely paralyzed and do not
know, even to this day, what struck them.
2nd. Immediately after the election
various astute financiers and manufac
turers, assuming that we intended to put
into operation the platform adopted at
Chicago, began to curtail their operations,
and in a short time, many of our leading
industries were paralyzed and the
"change" was so rapid and effective, that
much sooner than we had expected our
fool friends found that the "change" was
getting in its good, elegant work and
thousands upon thousands of laboring
men were out of employment, and, with
the swiftness of lightning, every artery of
the national system was also paralyzed.
3rd, It was not long until in many of
our leading cities, mobs of laboring men
were crying for work or bread, and in nu
merous instances, riots were inaugurated,
that resulted in bloodshed. Banks and
business enterprises of every kind were
forced into bankruptcy, and assignees and
receivers, were gloating in ghoulish glee
oyer the "change" which resulted in giv
ing them fat jobs.
4th. Capital was wholly withdrawn
rom business enterprises and money from
circulation, and foreign nations began
calling in their loans, while industrial
stocks depreciated so fast that Nancy
Hanks could not trot fast enough to keep
in sight of the disappearance of values.
Distrust, doubt, and dismay, succeeded
confidence, faith and trust, and we were
soon enjoying "good old democratic
times," with a vengeance. Our work was
so successfully performed, that not an in
terest escaped its blighting effect, and
and while exultingly crowing over the
results, I for one could not help ejaculat
ing with Puck
"What fools these mortals be." Excuse
my seeming hilarity, but I have to laugh
every time that I think of the working
men and farmers that were wheeled into
our support, and, as I see the former vain
ly seeking work, and the latter selling
their products for less than in 35 years, I
smile a smole of deep content, and wonder
what foolishness they will go into next.
5th. It had been many a long day since
we could enjoy conditions that fully satis
fied our desires, and I must congratulate
you upon the complete success of your
little scheme and also assure you of my
hearty support of any plans you may
adopt for the campaign of 1896: and also
to remind ^vou that "the dear people" will
be just as ti, ar to be swindled then as
heretofore, for P. T. Barnum was em
inently correct when he said, "The peo
ple like to be humbugged."
Again pledging my loyalty to you and
your schemes, and trusting that success
will ever perch on your banner, I am,
Respectfully,
GEN. STARVATION,
Field Marshal.
titan.
I* A. TEMMET
Has just returned from the East with the Finest Lot of
DRESS GOODS, LININGS, SHEETING, CLOTHING, BOOTS & SHOES,
in fact everything in the Dry Goods line that he will sell from
30 to 50 per cent. Below Cost for Cash for the Next 30 Dayrf
Cro and See Him.
L. A. TEMMEY* Onida, S. D.
TTEAB. YE!
GO TO THE
IA1HAI1
And buy Goods at
Reduced Prices for Cash
Cut Prices on Nearly Everything. Now is Your Time to
BUY CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, HARDWARE
and MOST GROCERIES.
Onida, S.D. M, I*. FRENCH.
HAIL AND WIND STORMS MAY
SWEEP THE COUNTRY and
DESTROY CROPS.
CONGRESS MAY REPEAL
ML
ONIDA,
THE
SHERMAN»ACT.
I have on hand
—WORTH OF—
Xiftdies' Dress Goods, Gents'
Hats, Clothing, and
Roots and Shoes,
THAT I WILL SELL AT HARD TIME
PRICES. 1-3 CHEAP
EH than
ANY ONE ELSE.
Come and See Me, and
Save Money.
T. M. Simmons, Blunt.
W. N. MELOON,
-AJsTD
i
SOUTH DAKOTA.
Title Examination a Specialty.
I have the Only Abstracts in Sully County.
J. H. GROPENGIESER,
INVESTMENTS FOR NON-RESIDENTS,
TITLES EXAMINED, ABSTRACTS FURNISHED,
TAXES PAID.
ONIDA, SOUTH DAKOTA
fit. .'• .-»
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