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The evening herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, May 31, 1921, Image 1

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READ THE FULL STORY OF JACK DEMPSEY'S CAREER :: SP0RTPA6ET
STJt lEuento itottUi
Today New
Today
Do
Member of the Associated Press.
'Iflorotli Veiir No, mill
KI,A,MATH FALUt, OHKOON, TlIMDAV, MA V ill, IlKil
PRICE FIVK CENTS
I IIYfv'ijP I
UUATi
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KLAMATH
TRIBUTE TO IK
'S
Great Crowd Joins in
Parade to Cemetery
And Exercises Over!
Graves of Departed.
' Decoration Day In Klumath Falls
was patriotically ohsarvod liy tho '
citizens unit tint members of tho'
vurloiiH military organizations of all
I tin warn yesterday iindur vnry fa
wirublo comlltloni).
Tin procession formed on Main I
street unilvr tho direction of Clrninl'
Marshal (). C. Applegalo and Ills
stuff iiiul at 9-30 o'clock, tho par-1
ailn moved ilirwn Main strcat nnil
I hence out towards tho cemetery
At tint hrltlgu, tho rltuullntlc corn-1
monies In honor of tho departed
naval heroes worn faithfully carried
out and at tho eiitruticn to tho cem
etery, tin' column roverHcil and per
mitted tho inotuhiirH of tho 0 A It
to enter ttiii grounds first.
Mayor Wiley uddrisictl tho tin-ne-iiblcd
saying In part: I
"While thero In hut a remnant of
tho (fnlon velerutiH of tho Civil war
hero assembled, tho plrltunl pres
ence of those who have gono bo,
yond, an exemplified by thU llttloj
monument hero oroctod to their.
memory, makes an appeal to our
Imagination stronger than If thoy
were horo In tho flesh, becauso of
tho deathless, patriotic services they
rendered unto our country. Llku
IlratiiN, who dies with tho name of
CiKiiur upon hi lips, wo ran say:
"Vnteruns of tho Union Army, thou
art nt 111 mighty. " You
worn tho
.hnninlnn. .. m!,u - . .1.. ....
..-..,...... u. ...,.. .,,, -
luiji us H1IULH ! IS S Hill IIirilM ri '
tnesa ro
.'ou taught
Ity to tho
publican lands of ours, Y
us n new lesson of fealty
constitution boquoathcr to tit by our
fathern lly tho sldu of tho gruvc
all dlfferonorrj havn long been for-
Kolten, and' today both tho Ji'orth
nnd lh South Join In tho obsorv-
unro of this sad national festival
Americans aro bravo enough and
stronR enough to stand by thin
country's truo history.
"Today IOS.000,000 of grateful
rllltens bow In reyeronco to tho
memory of their soldier dead, and
ronsecrato nnow their allowance
to our country. (A loving trlbut.)
was horo tnado to tho soldier dead
of tho Indian, Spanlsh-Amorlcan
nd World wars.)
"It scorns only yesterday wo
nnuln heard tho tolling of Llhorty
ImiII, when America again took arms
nnd commenced marching, bocnuiu
our Institutions woro threatened by
(Jormnny. Wo do not want to bo
to wnr. Wo woro taunted beyond
onduranco, "When nowovor Oor
inany told us nho "would blow us
up with hrr submnrlnos If wo cross
pi! certain Imaginary lines on tho
high xeaH, nnd alio did torpedo
American vonnolr. wltt Amorlcan
(Contlnuod to Ingo 4)
Trial Is Underway
In the Circuit Court
Ileforo a Jury composed of Austin
Haydon, Hob, Robot tson, Otto Hold
rich, A. II. Collins, T. M. Cunning
ham, I.eo Iloan, I'otor Ilower, W. S.
Slough, James Illalr, C. N. Sutton
nnd John Kndors, tho complaint of
T. It. Marqunrt and K, N. Wood
ugalnst Roy 0. I'atch ullogod to havo
converted and sold an Overland car,
wan heard In tho circuit court this
forenoon.
Kxnmlnatlon of wltnoasoa occupied
tho beat part of tho afternoon.
Tho verdict Is expected late today.
Tho noxt case on tho dockot la tho
eoflo ot Stnto against Arthur Staar,
charged with burglary, which will
begin Immediately at tho conclualon
of tho I'atch oaso.
NATON
El
Insurgent
General Adelbcrt Korfanty leader
of tho I'ollth Insurgents In Upper
Bllrala. Ha has cntcrol that terri
tory, determined to retain Silesia fol
Poland, desplto tho recent ploblscltl
that cava tho district to Germany.
s
Plans aro under way for n big ben
efit entertainment to bo Riven at tho
Mondalo thentro Friday and Satur
day evenings, with n matlnoo Satur
day afternoon, tho proceed-, from
which will ko to tho fund for tho re
lief of fcuffureni In Ireland. Tho af
fair In given under tho uusplron of
jnu murican Association for tho
cco(nlt,on of 10 ,rlBh uopublle. u
,,rnncn ot wn'cn wa organized hero
recently. In a Htatemvnt Issued to
day by 11. M. MannlnR, president of
' tho assocutlon, ho says:
This cntertalntnont Is Rolnj; to bo
unusual from many points, In tho
trl place thero will bo no collection
taken up or solicitation of any kind
whatover. When tboso attending buy
a tlckot, their expenditure Btops thero
In tho socond place wo aro going to
glvo a two dollar show for fifty cents.
It -will bo on entertainment that
those attending will enjoy from tho
start to tha finish. Thero will bo a
plcturo filled with all ot tho tradi
tions, lave, wit and tho wco bit ot
sorrow that louds such sweetness to
tho Kinorald Islo and all 'that comes
from It. In addition thero will bo mu
sical program participated In by tho
musical urtlsts of tho city. Theso hao
gladly given tholr services, for out oil
tho fullness of tholr hearts thoy uro
answering to tho far off cry of a
suffering peoplo our peoplo, our
flesh nnd blood and kin, who In this
hour of need aro turning with pite
ous appeal to tho English-speaking
world for that succor that 1 know Is
not to bo denied them. These artists
aro giving tholr llmo and tholr tal
ent gladly and freely. Tho program
will bo ono oqunl to tholr whole
hearted gonoroslty nnd tho worthi
ness of tho causa for 'which it la given
nnd I promlso tho peoplo of this city
nn ontortolnmont that has novor been
surpaaaod and very seldom equaled In
this city." '
Youth Arrested
For Auto Theft
Kdward V. Jpncs, agod 19. ap-
poared boforo Justlco Oaghagon
'. . .. .. . ... I
hub uiiuruuun uii -r6 . -
tomptod theft of tho car ot A. C.I
Gclngor nt Chllonuln lost night,
Golngor Is said to havo caught
Jones in tho act ot romoving tho
car. Jonas says his rolatlvcs live In
California.
Jones Is said to havo passod sev
eral bogus chocks during bis stay
nt Ohlloquln.
on t
THE HONORED DEAD
Melon In ii list of Klamatli
M'rvlro durliiK tho world war,
(Iii'h ineiiiiirliil twirlM-si
HOWARD 1100(18, VKIINAI. CLJFF, VAN ALLEN CORNISH, ER.
NK8T IM'GGAR, nVHRHTT GIL11ERT, ALBERT B. HAMILTON, AL-
ih.rt w joni:8, conrad lbinl.h, nicholas w. i'anaooh,
jami:b i: pahazoo, lho parribh. ray peters, don red
field, pai'l rovach, louis folle, raymond tower, frank
tucker, jack turner, cucil weekh
T TONIGHT
TO COMPLETE
FOURTH PUNS
Tonight at 7 4C o'clock, In tho
Chamber of Commerce rooms, tho
promoters mid Interested citizens of
this rlty will gather to perfect and
put Into operation tho Initial plans
for tho Fourth of July colebratlon to
bo held In this city
Saturday morning, tho soliciting
committees selected to Interview tho
business man and citizens for either
money or mi-rchandlsn woro actlvo In
all parts of this city and at noon that
day, stated that thero wcro but two
business men in places north of Main
street, who had failed to participate
In the proposition.
This morning, tho commlttco sc-
I locteil to Interview tho merchants on
tlin south side of Main street, began
their work u.irly and canvassed near
ly all tho business houses, mills nnd
banking Institutions. Just how much
was secured was not made public, but
It was satisfactory, according to ono
member of the committee V
Tho uurnose of tha moating to
night wllf bo to lay before tho cltl-'
tens tha exact amount ot money ob
tained, tho marchandlso and prizes
to bo awarded for athletic or other
contests; tho determination of tho
class of cntortalnment to bo offered,
and tho quostlon as to tho prelimi
nary organization ot an association
to carry on work ot this nature In
the future
Thoro Is a well doflned opinion
among most of tho promotors of this
Fourth of July celebration that Kla
math Falls has many natural sccnlo
advantages which should bo mado
known all over tho country, and the
many features of this ectlon would
best ho exploltod through the means
of u rodeo -Mch would outrival the
ones at tho Choycnno, Wyoming, nnd
Pendleton, Oregon. Should tho finan
ces bo grout enough at this ditto, tho
money would bo spent In a way that
would. In tho end, result In perma
nent boncflts. This feature will bo
,taken up tonight for a doclslon
Chairman Fred. Houston stated
thut ho wants tho committees to bo
proscnt at tho meeting early so that
tholr roports con bo mado and tho
business session opened at onco. Also
n this celohrntlon Is not a business
men's proposition, tho rank and fllo
of tho citizens of this city nro In
I
vltod'to nttond and participate, Mr.fuf the Republic and as a sacred duty
Houston urges a largo attendance at
7MG o'clock sharp In tho Chamber
of Commorco rooms.
Ilf.SINK.H8 WOMKN TO MKKT
Kvery buslnoss womnn Is urged to
attend tho spcclnl meeting of tho Kla
math Falls llualncaa Women's club
'onlght nt tho Chamber of Commerce
at 7:30 o'clock.
HERALD WILL COVER BIG FIGHT
iWIio'n KI'"K t Mln the bid fiht?
In rvstu runts will hotel lobbied, pool roonvs iuiiI parlors, buslnewi
ofHccH anil buukN, oil street cam and l'ullnuuw, eterjrwbero u Ko,
llils (lueNtlon 1m tlm tonic of discussion.
Wo venture to nay that JWM) fans In Klumuth Falls nro keenly in
tercotcd In tho outcome of tho Ik-inpsey.Carncntler flRht. A thousand.
""' ro -merrsica ui mora r -
paper reader U interetited to nomo
ItonlulnK this
Interest In
through tho Newspaper Enterprise
tho fight thoroughly.
rignt iann wui linu inieresiini rrauinjc irwni me pens wu ijrpo
writers ot n score of special writersexperts llko Hal Cochran, Johnny
Kllbime, feather-weight champion, nnd Max llolthaxar.
Tliclr serious discussions iU bo enlivened by Ilerton Droley poems,
humor front tho pen of Jock ltnpor
That's Just sample. Watch the sporting pages ot Tho Herald" e t0 taJV '? f m ' '
from now nntU July a for tho rest of tlto names and all tho dope Smith, and W. W. McNoaloy will pro
ubout tho !Ik battle. side.
county men who died In Ilio country'
Tliclr memory woi honored In yeMcr-
FOUGHT AT FORT
EYE OF UNGOLN
Captain James H. Smith, Civil War
veteran, arrived Saturday evening
from Saw telle, Calif., and Is visit
ing his niece, Mrs. J. J. Furber, for n
few days, beforo going to Portland and
Roscburg. Captain Smith will visit
the tctcran'H home at Roscburg before
returning to the California soldiers'
home.
Tho aged veteran, he Is 79 years old,
has had 'an Interesting career. Ho
enlisted In Company A, 43d New York
Infantry, as a private, In August, 18C1,
and sen cd throughout the war. He
was promoted nlno times, He partici
pated In thirty engagements, many ot
them major battles, and was wounded
seven times.
One of his wounds, a bayonet
thruBt, preceded capture by the Con
federates and Incarceration InLlbby
prison.
'lie served under' Generals McClcl
Ian, Durnstde, Hooker, Meade, Sedg
wick, Grant and Sheridan, and at the
battle of Fort Stevens, July 12, 1864.
ho fought under the eyes of President
Lincoln to save the menaced capital
at Washington.
Captain Smith was a friend of bis
namesake, the Rev. Charles Smith,
author of "America."
The old soldier comes of a fighting
line. His ancestors were New Eng
landers, and the family wan repre
sented In the ranks during the Revo
lution, the War of 1813, and the Mex
ican war.
Captain Smith, besides his associa
tion with tho G. A. R is a 32nd de
gree Mason, Shriner, Odd Fellow and
member ot tho Loyal Legion.
At yesterday's Memorial exercises
ha took an active part, placing flowers
upon tho monument ot Civil War vet
erans In tho local cemetery, and mole
lngn brief address. Ho said In part:
"Standing under the broad canopy
ot heaven this sacred Memorial day,
and In tho presence of this gathering,
among whom there are many young
men who, in their oung manhood,
bared their breasts and went forth to
battle for tho protection ot our glor
ious flag, and In the shadow of this
monument erected by loving hands as
n tributu of remembranco above thoj
bodies ot the heroic somier anu souor
dead; as a member of tho Grand Army
enjoined upon the memoera oi mat
patriotic order on Memorial day, I
scatter upon the base ot this monu
ment theso flowers In token of affec
tion for nil those who gavo their lives
for national honor nnd human lib
erty. "Theso flowers shall wither and fado
away, but tho tender love for(whlch
they stand shall enduro forover."
...u-.-r u-t,-- ..,, ,re, --
extent.
STEVENS UNO
tho Jersey event ot July 2 Tho Herald,
Association, has arranged to cover
nnd tho feminine views of Alice (
Yes, It's George
Lw iSssssA
BSSSSSSSkkB'kM
1.SSSSSSSSH
I Jif
1 B J
Colonel CJtorco Harvey.
dor to England, dressrf In hi finest
When he went to pay hta respect
to King Qeorce.
NEW DIE CO. TO
Another oil company has completed
organization and Is reaay to get down
to active operations In the formation
of the Yonna Valley Oil and Gas com
pany, whlc"hld Its arfftnuUtrui
meeting Saturday evening.
The tallowing directors were elect
ed: A. L. Michael, Charles Flackus, J.
L. Sparrentorn, Dan Drlscoll, W. S.
Wiley, Thomas Patterson, Ross Sut
ton and R. H. Bunnell.
The officers are Ross Sutton, presi
dent; A. L. Michael, first vice presi
dent: R. H. Dunnell, second vice presi
dent: W. S. Wiley, secretary, and
Charles Flackus, treasurer. The cor
poration Is capitalized for 1500,000.
The company now has under lease
some 25,000 acres, extending from
Sprague river to Malln, Including land
In Yonna Valley, Langell Valley,
Meadow Lake, Swan Lake, Klamath
Basin and other places. Some of the
land is within two miles of Klamath
Falls.
This Immense territory will be gone
over by an expert geologist, and upon
bis Judgment will depend the location
ot tho first well.
Mr. Sutton said yesterday that
workmen wero getting out timbers for
tha derrick, and that the contracts
called for beginning ot drilling within
60 days. Tho company owns a rig
that has been used In boring water
weu.,t anj tj,ig wm D0 used on the oil
well, at least for the start. It Is ade
quate to bore to a 3,000 foot depth,
said Mr. Sutton.
The new company Is a muutal cor
poration. AH ot the share holders are
land owners and hold shares In pro
portion to tho acreage leased to tbe
company. All will share proportion
ately In tho profits of tho venture.
Tho drilling will bo In charge of
George Hartley, who besides a year
and n halt's experience in the oil
fields, has had a lifetime ot water well
drilling experienco In this county, and
Is familiar with local formations down
to n thousand feet a valuable asset In
stalling the well.
Loan and Bonus Act
Is Topic for Forum
The soldier loan measure, which la
to be voted upon June 7th, will be tho
topic ot discussion at tomorrow's
Chamber ot Commerco forum meeting.
The American Legion has been asked
to furnish at least one speaker to ex
plain tho measure.
TN
COLUMBIA COTS
DIKE; BIG AREA
IS UNDER WATER
Half a Million Dollars
Worth of Crops Des
troyed by Floods;
Settlers Make Es
cape. WOODLAND, Wash., May 31,
Flood waters from tho Columbia river,"
which broke through 75 feet of dike
six miles north of Woodland at 7
o'clock last night, are spreading today,
after flooding nearly 5,000 acres to a
depth ot eight to ten feet.
.There was no loss If life, as warning
had' been given o all residents of the
flooded districts to be prepared for the
break.
The damage Is chiefly to' crops ot
wheat, oats and potatoes, and Is'estl- ,
mated at from 1300,000 to 1500,000.
At 5 o'clock this morning the water
broko through the culvert on the)
Northern Pacific railroad, causing
a still further spread of Inundation.
About 100 cattle are still to be rescued.
Many hundreds were driven from tbe
flood zone.
Grant Burko, son of James Burke,
pioneer rancher, narrowly escaped
death, when the pump bouse on the
dike washed away while be was with
In It.
The water continued spreading
throughout tbe morning over the
)owlandsVTiprth otvhiiretbut fiTgrTja-
torvenlng ground saved the city ot
Woodland from ddrtfcer, ,
Water continued to' pour through '
tho Burrls Creek culvert, which had
been blockod with sand bags by
Woodland men last night.
The mournful lowing ot tbe ma .
rooned cattle can be heard over the
watery wastes and boats are being
used to get those that are still alive
away from the flooded pastures.
EX
END TIME TO
RE
OVER CHARGE
Under a recent order ot James
James C. Davis, director general ot
railroads, the former order, fixing
March 1st as the last date for filing
claims for freight overcharges Incur
red under federal control of tho rail
ways, has been set aside, and Septem
ber 1, 1921, set aside as tho final
date.
This means an opportunity tor
Klamath Falls shippers to present de- ,
mands for refunds aggregating thou
sands ot dollars. When the former
order was Issued M. A. Callagban,
traffic manager, bad Just token the
local, position. He unearthed many
claims, but stopped that phase ot his
work when tho time limit was set at
March 1st.
Now that tho tlmo has been extend
cd thero Is no doubt that local ship
pers will demand tho refunds that aro
coming to thorn.
Claims for overcharges, made prior
to Mnrch 1, 1921, may be presented,
either to tbe carrier direct or tbe in
terstate commerce commission. It
valid they will be paid by the carrier,
but If dispute arises tbe settlement
will bo referred to the Interstate com
merce commission.
MARKET REPORT
PORTLAND, Oro., May 31.
Cattle. 25 cents higher: choice
steers, 7. SO to 17,75; hogs, steady;
shoep, 25 cents higher; prime
lambs, 16.50 to $7; eggs and but
tor, steady.
N
T
IT'S ON PAGE I
A
YOliU FIND CARPENTIERS
A
READING

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