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The Morgan County press. (Wartburg, Tenn.) 1916-1926, September 30, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99065839/1921-09-30/ed-1/seq-6/

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I EAGLE "MIKADO" PENCIL No. 174
K 11
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For Sb at Your Dealer. m!Tim
ASK FOR THE YELLOW PENCIL WITH THE RED BAND
EAGLE M1KAUU
NEW YORK
PROFESSIO AL CARDS
S. H. JONES, M. D.
Paysioian and Surgeon and X Ray
Examination
SUNBRIGHT, TENN.
DR. ARCHIE BYRD
' PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Wartbukg, Tennessee.
T. W. NASH, M. D.
(Physician & Surgeon
Dyixis. - - - Tennessee.
T. A. MORRIS S. H. JESTES
MORRIS & JESTES
Attorneys and Solicitors
WARTBORG, TENN.
Will practice in all the courts collections
and commercial law a s jecialtv.
J. HUMAN,
Attorney at Law
Wartburg, Tenn
Cassell, Harris & Evans
Attorneys at Law
Harriman, -:- Tennessee.
Practice in all State and Federal Courts
Dr. C. O. Johnson
DENTIST AND OPTOMETRIST
Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted
Rooms 2 and 4
First National Bank Building
ROCKWOOD. -:- TENN.
Tennessee
IFarm News-
PREPARED BY DIVISION
OF EXTENSION, UNIVER
SITY OF TENNESSEE.
Select Seed Com From Standing
Stalks.
Pawing over the ears of corn af
ter they have been stored away in
the crib and picking seed from the
likeliest looking ears is a method
that belongs to the ox-team and the
cradle.
Uptodate farmers ' nowadays
choose their seed corn from the
standing stalks where they can ob
serve the growing conditions; and
thus often immensely increase the
value of a given lot of seed.
When selecting seed corn in the
field, keep your eye out for the
sturdy upright stalk of medium
height and thickness, with short
joints and broad leaves carried well
down, which stands in an average
soil. Then look for an ear well ma
tured and set fairly low, of medium
size cob, a not too large butt, and a
hu?k protecting the tip. Remember
ing also that one good ear is better
than two nubbins, be satisfied with
the single good ear on the stalk when
thft stand is thick.
Another advantage of selecting
corn in this way is that stalk char
acteristics can be noted and selec
tions made accordingly. For in
stance, the more or less hereditary
tendency to produce suckers can be
' reduced by selection; stalks blown
over by storms are inherently weak
onrl nhnnld be avoided; under uoi
circumstances should ears from.
diseased stalks be considered.
When selecting corn in .the field
it is often hard for the grower to
oay 4s much attention as he would
I like to the ear characteristics- It is
m a 1 A A
a good plan, therefore, to seieci iwu
or three times as much seed as is
needed, and to go over it again m
the spring with an eye to ear char
acteristics- Often growers carry
forward good seed from one spring
to the next in case of emergencies
that might arise from unfavorable
weather or storing conditions.
Hogs Will Make Money Out of
Big Corn Crop.
On account of the relative high
price of hogs, many farmers' have
planned to produce fall litters of
pigs, instead of fattening their brood
f Via market, according to
0UO v
the specialists of the Division of
Extension, University of Tennessee.
The ratio between the prices nf hogs
and corn makes this a commenda
ble practice. With corn at present
prices, 8 or 9 cent hogf should re
turn liberal profits, and farmers
who raised a good spring pig crop
should consider themselves fortu
nate. With another big corn crop
practically assured the production
of fall pigs has been encouraged.
While hoes may not hold their pre
sent high market position, it would
take a material drop in prices to
make feeding unprofitable at pre
sent corn values Men who have
gone through similar periods of de
pression in years past say that once
again hogs have come to the rescue
of the farmer. Time and again hogs
have "rooted'' the farmer out of
distress, and there is every reason
to believe they will do it again. An
abundance of corn puis good pork
prices bid fair to hold up the mor
als of the farmer, provide him with
money to pay his interest and taxes,
and encourage him to stand ready
for another year.
Farm Breeding Pen.
Thei question of a special .breeding
pen on the farm is apt to bring forth
doubts' of its being a workable plan.
However, it is easy enough and can
be managed in at least two ways
that any farm womancan carry out
says Mrs. Kate M. Wells, poultry
specialist, Division of Extension
The most important point is fur
nishing a separate house or room
for the roosting and laying quarters
for the breeders. This can most easi-
lvbe done by putting a partition in
in nnA pnd of the poultry house,
large enough to house the breeders?.
Twenty-five hen? can be housed in
a Zxtfi or a 6x12 room, arranging
it as to roosts, nests, feed hoppers
and water vessels as in the larger
laying house.
Community Club Helps Get
Preacher.
According to a recent reprot from
F. C. McCuskey, agricultural agent
for Franklin County, the communi
ty organization at Center Grove has
as-isted in securing a preacher for
that community, and the organiza
tion of a Sunday school, and at a
recent meeting raised $75 00 to
help pay the preacher for the next
six months. This is another dem
onstration of the good that can I e
accomplished when people of a, com
munity will act as a unit.
Business Women ot Town Get
ting in Touch With Business
Women of Country.
Evidence of the fact that the old
social barrier which has existed be
tween people of the rural districts
and those of the towns in past gen
erations is fast becoming a thing of
the past in Tennessee was clearly
demonstrated at the recent farmero'
institute at'Columbia. The Business
and Professional Women's Club of
Columbia did much to make the
Homemakers section of the institute
a success. They furnished a rest
room for the members of the Home
maker's section which added much
to their comfort. The town women
also took an active part in helping
Uie rural women stage a dress page
ant, an evening's entertainment put
on to show dressing of farmer per
iods and to illustrate proper dress
for different present day occasions.
Many of themv attended the program
provided entertainment for the ru
ral women while in the city and
otherwise devoted much time to
making their stay pleasant as well
as profitable.
Co-operation of the women of the
towns and cities of the state with
rural women in their meetings has
bien noted on frequent occasions in
recent years by Extension workers
of the University of Tennessee and
thy look on it as one of the hope
ful sigqs of the times. The business
nf the towns are getting in
touch with the business women of
the farms. The farm women are
finding that the women of the
towns are good people to know and
the town women are beginning to
feel the same way about the country
women, and so the old line that
has existed so long is being rubbed
out and in its place a spirit of co
operation and helpfulness is spring
ing up which will mean a happier
and more contented womanhood in
Tennessee- - , ,
ARE YOU
GUILTY
r
"IT
express
carrying an
ckage from
. u moflwwWMnse was
accosted by a local dealer.
"IVh JtJal ft bag tff
twoduoa tht exprtmt, mi W"
,pabmUngm
WW.
unit mmmaia aMt
Wmmm iAm. tthfcA
mmJ iWUl tlO OttM
Tht fam looted u,mm
chant a moment and that taidl
"Why m'i voo patronln mt
home peper andadoertbf I nod
MORAL ADVERTISE
Let Us Be Your
Business Partner
Your partner has a knowledge of your
business and you look to him for advice and ,
counsel on imrjortant matters. You are en- ,
titled to all the help he can give you.
Do you get a partner's help on your printed
matter? Do you get the most from the special
ized knowledge which we have regarding
printing and paper, and above all the service
which a comSination of the two can render?
Our job department has every modern equip
ment for doing work on rush orders. For
letterheads, billheads, and all lands of forms,
we carry in stock, recommend and use
The Utility Htuine Taper
Let Us Serve You as a Partner
THE' UaiOTffKVCAn
NewFord Prices
Effective Sept. 2, 1 92 1
$355.00
425 CO
325.00
395.00
Touring car without starter, F- O. B. factory
Touring car with starter,
Runabout without starter,
Runabout with starter,
To above must be added freight, wartax, gas, oil and grease.
If demountable rims are wanted add 825.00.
'
John A. East Company
Phone 156
ROCKWOOD. : : : : TENNESSEE
Increase in Business
Of The
OAKDALE BANK I TRUST COMPANY
Oakdale, Tennessee .
Since January 3rd, 1920, Over 113,000.00
Condensed Statement at Close of Business, Sept. 24, 1920
RESOURCE8 . LIABILITIES
Loans and Discounts $101,071.76 Capital Stock . $ 10,000.00
Liberty Bonds and ' -
Treas-Certif. ' 41,000.00 Surplus & U. P. 5,811.60
Bank. House, F. & Fix. 2,600.00 Bonds Borrow. 15,000.00
Expense & Int. Paid 1,161.23 Deposits 203.787.52
Real Estate 200.00
Cash on Hand & in Bks. 88.566.13
Total 8234.599.12 . $234,599-12
You can bank with us by mail. Special attention -given
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS.
YOU CAN HELP US,
WE CAN HELP YOU.
No account is too small or too large to receive our best
attention. v
If You Have Money We Want It.
If You Want Money We Have It.

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