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Wessington Springs herald. (Wessington Springs, Aurora County, Dakota [S.D.]) 1883-1891, September 05, 1890, Image 1

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99067997/1890-09-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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•iV'-gW'
Editor
Blank
VOL- VTTI. NO-
business carps.
1
tn. MAT HI AS, M. D.
jwoof tli« University of Pennsylvania
IlC*"' ,1M«i offers his professional services.
|#sse' a
foil liue of
,uRE DRUGS
^fURNER, N.
D.|
\i
physician and Surgeon.
Wossmgton Springs Dakota,
#tl(e-
North Side Main Btreet. fe^lBO
riANKINTON. DAKOTA. 3-l«f
I^ifttkwaad
t*. MCDONALD,
Inlio.
If-H-E I-N-T-E-R-N-A-T-I-0-N-A-L-!
:I TYPEWRITER.!
IA strictly first-class machine. Fully
branted. Made from very best
bterial, by skilled workmen, and
pith the best tools that have ever been'
pfviseti for the purpose. Warranted
do all that can be reasonably ex
erted of the very best typewriter
itant. Capable of writing 150 words
minute—or more—according to
le ability of the operator.
im
AND MFOICINES
cntionery. Toilet Articles, Garden Seeds
'1*' rain's. OUR. Glass, Putty,
he.
,E^ix(iroN springs. Dakota.
M. D.
U, e. 8HOUSE,
gf-SSS
1 jtsMpaltiic P&Tsician aai Snrjeai.
Notary Paklio
Wessington Springs, Dakota.
Conveyaiicinp: promptly and carefully atteud
Will practice in all the Territorial courts
CoUectioms remitted as soon as made.
Md
f•f
E, C. NORDYKE
OCA WY FRO
I Till transact Real Estate business
make collections promptly
I md practice in all courts in the state.
R. FRANCIS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW 'A
U.
AND
SOLICITOR OF PENSIONS:
fj^IMITON SI'RINOS, 8. Dak.
K. COLE,
Watchmaker and Jeweler.
-Special attention given to fine re
pairing, engraving &c. Third door
south of Sanborn County Bank,
Woonsocket South Dak.
$100.00
IF there are no a^eiits your town
Mressthe manufacturers:
THE PARISH MF'CCO.,
Agents wanted. PARISH, N.
fDpi?" STENOGRAPHY and
IUtili. TYPKWK TING FKEE.
nrst-class facilities and best of
achors. Address, with stamp for
Burn postage,
THE
PARISH MF'G CO.
Parish, N. Y.
|Kse Aroh Omti, Pbilad'a.
i. S¥ARK£Y & fALEX'S
JREATMENT BY INHALATION
(forConsumption, Asthma, Bronohi
LSipepsia, Catairh, Hay Fever.
lliX !)riKinal and only genuine (impound
Itein,
eallllel»t," lrs.
ttfV,HlnK
u'e '\voril}
Starkey & Paleu have
t(,r ,lle
Sitrr
last twenty years, is a scien-
,|lu'"t
of tin elements of Oxygen and
i&fcfi1 I^'^etizki),and the compound Is so
1Ifr
malti
Ii&7AltKEY
l,or'®','e that it is sent all
I'aTkn
&
A
have the liberty to
followi|iB
Ihs«
named well known per-
„swho li-ivc tried their treatment:
im
JlcS• '.yVr'.'.'JfOTox. Kd. New South,
.A V'ooman,
New Y.
Quenemo,
lltvp |f^
KA
I'Ivkbmobe, Melrose, Mass.
I™1!
V,1!?lue
1U1.
ItoE.1,Kvi'iHT, Philadelphia.
lnJ.FftA.VK SmiiAi. Merchant. Philadelphia.
Pov\VwK«Sn,I,Al''Ml
ltW,,^R(:iluvl**. Has ton Pa.
ICrVr ?.si'833"roadway N Ed Phlla. Plioto
I'lteivi Waiinea, Hawaii Sandw. Is
lias
Kfv." Itn'OHiK, Inverness. Scotland.
|Hi
mv
'I'Rk. Utilla, Spanish Honduras, A
EOA-
Fresnillo, Zacatecas.Mex.
Pv C'Ounsul, Casablanca, Morocco
i'0(JEi"ed Bluff, Cal.
I Supt. Police
lif.tr,iYu. Bland ford. Dorsetshire, Eng.
I Ai
Bowral,
New South Wales.
Patted' states'"1''8 °"19r8 'n everj' part of the
ISiiWi
°*ygen ?ts Mode of Action and
t'"e°'
anew brochure of two
I#], !11 •'?«*. published by Drs. Starkey &
I ••''ii a', till,: ^lvcn to all Inquirers full inform a
l^'orjll'is remarkable curative agent and a
I'itlt ra H,HveSal '"'ndred surprising cures in a
Kt^beiiw. "I'ronic cases—many of them
ul?:,aJ»andoned to die by other physi
^''«n1^^^,^Ur,oc.m«Vy
addreM
°U
Ams?h,tPfEN
°txyeel»I,er
when you order
REPUBLICAN ticket.
COUNTY.
fsssawiuif"®^-
For Clerk ofCourts-N Dunham
®uPt. of Schools—Geo. Williams
For Assessor—D Paddock
£?£f«^eyor-XL Blank.
For Coroner—Dr. AM Mathlis
afiBSSSw
STATE.
PkkleraDd Jo?m (jinfbl'e68
i^nM°Te.ruorTA
Meliettee.
kvX M„™
."allt governor—Senator Hoffman
5ecretary Of State—O Riugsrud
For Treasurer—N VV Taylor.
For Auditor—L S Taylor.
Attorney General—Robert Dollard
G&° A 8a?man?Uuent °f
ruD,ic
0.FaPa?ker.Si0ner0fScb0°l
INDEPENDENT TICKET.
For Representati ve-V I Converse S
Register of Dceds-F W Whitnev.
Eor Auditor—O Marshall.
1
For Treasurer-Peter ShuUz,
For Sheriff-Pat McDonald.
lor County Judge—AI Churchill.
A'torney-Chas. W McDonald.
For Clerk of Courts—SS Vrooman.
JorSupt. cfSchools—Mrs. KVMiles.
For Suiveyor—B Shimp,
For Assessor—H A Frick.
or Coroner—John Chapman.
"Bin-
jKSSSS&asss.««»«».
IRRIGATION.
The third plank in the platform
adopted by the Republican convention
at Mitchell, favors a constitutional
amendment so that our state, counties,
or townships, may maintain a system
of irrigation. All of our readers rea
lize the importance of this action. At
the time the constitution was framed,
the fact that we were subject to long
and severe periods of drouth had not
been brought to mind, for we were
then in a period of abundant rain fall.
The fact that we need irrigation is ad
mitted by all. Another fact now fully
demonstrated, ia, that irrigation from
artesian wells can be successfully prac
ticed. Those attending the convention
at Mitchell had an opportunity to see
the samples of grain raised on the
Hitchcock farm near Huron, where
irrigation from the artesian well was
used. The wheat was sown April 19th
The irrigating ditches were not com
pleted uniil July 1st, at which time
the water was turned on. The sam
ples were from the same field. From
the part of the field without irrigation,
the straw was not over two feet in
height, and from the irrigated portion
it was fully four feet, showing a rank
heavy growth, with heads averging
from 3H to 4 inches in length, Sam
ples of tne grain showed as marked a
difference as did the growth of the
straw, one being small, the other plump
and well formed. Flax, grown under
the same conditions as the wheat was
also shown, and the difference was
ust as marked.
As to the yield, if our memory is not
at fault it was six, and twenty three
bushels respectively. We were as
sured by Mr. Hitchcock that perfect
fairness had been used in selecting the
From conversations with
delegates it was learned that in some
counties at least half a dozen wells will
be sunk, by private enterprise, before
winter sets in. It is the intention of
these parties to make a test of the
system next year, on a small scale at
least.
In one section, a gentleman who has
great faith in irrigation, is sinking a
large well and is now making coutracts
to irrigate hundreds o£ acres, at one
dollar per acre.
Considerable difficulty has been ex
perincedin some localites in sinking
wells on account of the drills not being
fully adapted to all the geological for
mations of South Dakota. A drill is
now being perfected at Aberdeen that
is doing good work, and it is believed
will overcome all the difficulties here
tofore encountered. Would it not be
wise for communities in our own
county to unite in sinking wells plac
ing them at points where they will
benefit the greatest number, and thus
provide against drouth another year?
If united action is taken, a drilling
outfit cad be purchased on a stock
company plan that will be of great
benefit to our county next year. Each
stock-holder, or community of stock
holders could either have free use of
the machine, or pay in a definate sum
to be returned as dividends. There
would then be little direct outlay in
sinking a well, aside from the tubing.
If the direct outlay could in this man
ner be brought down to about $1000t
would it not be possible to find from
25 to 50 men in many portions of our
county, who would be almost equally
benefited by a good well, who would
be willing to unite in perfecting a
scheme on the above plan? There are
points wehre one large well would fill
a chain of lake-beds extending entirely
across our county. With our lakes
filled we would be certain of having
more freqent showers, and the south
winds would loose some of their ter-
But something more than talk will
be necessary to accomplish this. It
will requre hard work, united action,
and the yielding of many individual
ideas and preferences.
Of
msfuctlon-
and
Public Lands
the
People,From
the
WOMANS REALM.
Under God The People Rule" Motto
of South Dakota.
ARE WOMEN PEOPLE??
Conducted by LoKllaH. Blank associate editor.
EQUAL SUFFRAGE MASS
CONVENTION
Held at Mitchell, S.D., Aug. 25 to
Mondat Afternoon.
The convention was called to order by the
President of the South Dakota Suffrage Asocla
tions, Mrs. Philena Everatt Johnson, at 3 p. m.
The South Dakota Female Quartette of Iro
quois sang a selection, which was followed by
an invocation by Rev. Olympia Brown of Wis
consin,
Rev, Adkinsonmade abrief but eloquent and
appropriate address of welcome to the conven
tion, which was responded to by Mrs. Pickler
on belialfof the State Association and by Miss
Sliaw on behalf of the Nattonal Association.
The quartette then sang the campaign soag
"Dakota, Land of Liberty," and being encored
gave another selection dedicated to Miss An
thony, after which Mrs. Johnson read the call
for the Convention and gave a cordial greeting
to all. Mrs, Johnson is a very pleasant speak
er, with clear voice and good articulation. With
rare executive ability,
Mrs. Laura M. Johns, state president of Kan
sas was then introduced aud gave a very inter
esting address on municipal suffrage in the
Sunflower state. Voting has not made the
women of Kansas massuliae in character,
manners or dress. Those who were good
house keepers before voting are good house
keepers now. There is no delay in the emigra
tion of young men into the state of matrimony
and the country Is not strewn with heartbroken
husbands and other dire
disasters as prophesied,
by Cassins Clay and others.
The following committies were then appointed:
Resolutions—Rev. Joshua Hines, Elk Point
Col. Sheets, Kingsbury Henry Blackwell,
Boston
Enrolment-Mrs.DcVoe, Huron Mrs. Ward,
Turner L. H. Baily, Hughes
Courtesies-Rev. A. W Adkinson, Mitchell
Mrs. Alice M. A. Pickler, Faulkton.
Short addresses were made by Rev. Hines,
Mrs. Swift, Alouzo Wardall and others, all
expressing their interest and hearty coopera
tions. A song by quartette and convention
adjourned.
Monday Evening.
A large audience was present when the
Convention was called to order by the president.
Rev. Abi. Hnntley of Wessington Springs eon
ducted the devotional exercises. Committee
on resolutions reported. After reading the
resolutions the chairman of the committee
moved that they be laid on the table until mor
ning and that the press have the liberty of
publishing them, the following are the reso
lutions which were ilunaly adapted:
1. Rbboi.vrd,
That South Dakota, by the
terms of the Enabling Act, Is under "MUrr"—
to frame.a constitution In conformation with
the principles of the Declaration of Indepen
dence that this declaration affirms that gov
ernments are just, only when they rest upon
"the consent of the governed that women
are governed, and the only form of political
consent is the ballot.
2.
Kksolvk.d,
That the brave and faithful
women of South Dakota, who have shared
with the men in the labors and privations of
doueer life, can be trusted to vote for God and
jomo and native land, and are entitled to an
equal share in the privileges and responsibilites
of statehood.
3. ltKSOLVED,
That the Republican party,
which gave suffrage to the negro men, and the
Democratic party, which gave suffrage
C. Resolved,That a committee of seven
be appointed by the chair to confer with the
Republican State Convention, about to meet in
this city, to present the views of this convention
and to request such favorable action as may be
wise and timely in behalf of the equal rights of
women.
Hon. Henry Blackwell, a noted lawyer, and
editoref the Woman's Journal of Boston then
addressed the audience on "Woman Suffrage,
a Growth of Civilation"
It is in accordance with nature, reason, re
ligion and science. "Male and female created
he them and gave
them
People,For
WESSINGTON SPRINGsTjERAULD COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY
dominion." First
governments were despotic but even despotism
is better than barbarism. Our first government
was anaristocracy of Mrth, now an aristocracy
of sex. There are men in the hotels here to
night who do not know that the Constitution
of the U. S. gives women the right of suffrage.
Benjamin Franklin, a born democrat, worked
to give laboring people the ballot, He alio
beleived in equality of sex. Democrats gave
the poor man the ballot, and tliot is the reason
why the laborers today are voting the Demo
cratic ticket. They learn that in the old
country and come here ready to vote for the
party theybelieve is working for them. Why
'this spirit of unrest? Because this government
is based on injustice. Some say it is all theory
that women suffrage would help. Women are
a class with class interests. Every class
makes itself felt in the government. A certain
man, John Morussey, wassentto Congress year
after year. He was a well known and noted
gambler. Why did he go? Because he was
•ent by gamblers who wanted laws in their fa
vor. So even that class was represented.
There is not a gambler nor a horsethlef in
South Dakota now who does not vote. Wo
men are the most law abiding citizens wo have.
Of criminals only one in ten are women. You
ask why we do not have woman suffrage in
Massachusetts? Because the cream of our coun
try comes west and their places are taken by
predjudiced foreigners who have to learn by
slow degrees the meaning of the Declaration of
Independence. Mr. Blackwell closed by reci
ting in a telling manner, Bryant's poeinon"The
New West."
Miss Shaw made a witty collection speech
and while the collection was being taken, the
choir sang "King Dem Suffrage Hells."
Adjourned to 9:30a.in.Tuesday.
(Continued next week.)
the
People."
Railroad
27.
A
time taw.i.,
O. M. & St, P.
Alpena—Passenger South at 10-Ma. n,
Passenger North at
Freight North at 10:21 ant
Freight South at
4:20
CO
sap®**
with Vestibnied Trains be
waukee, Ht. Paul and Mln
go
,S700,MIIW
SjP^ Wjnts inininols, Wisconsin,
Iowa, Mlssturi and Dakota.
reaching
For maps, time tables, rates of
NORTH­
to
the
working men, and the Fanners' Alliance, which
opposes monopolies and class distinctions, are
all under a moral obligation to support the
woman suffrage amendment, which will remove
the stigma or disfranchisement from 70,000
women citizens of South Dakota.
4. Rksolvki,
WESTERN
mm
}. a.
That .so long as women are
not allowed to vote, tliey cannot be members
of any political party that no party which
does not advocate their enfranchisement has
any claim to their support that the attitude of
women toward parties aud candidates during
the coming campaign must, depend upon the
attitude of parties and candidates towards wo
man suffrage, aud we remind politicians that
every extention of suffrage hitherto made has
strengthened the party which advocates it and
has weakened the party which opposes it.
5. Rkholvjco,That
the adoption of the wo
man suffrage amendment will make South
Dakota, side by side with Wyoming, nobly
conspicuous throughout the Union, will
strengthen the financial standing of the state,
will attract capital from abroad, will greatly
increase intelligent immigration from the east
ern states, and above all will secure the per
manent supremacy of temperance, liberty, and
justice,
RAILWAY.
OVER 7,000 HUES
Of stwl track In Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin,
Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Dakota
and Wyoming, penetrates the Agricultural,
Mining and Commercial Centres of the
WEST AND N0BTHWEST.
TMHf^wabd 'pquipment of the Line
Smqarag^&mptuous Dining Cars, New
Wagf^Mndj.&uttrtiiri sleepers. Superb
^ayC&aches anicf
fAfrVESTtBOLEO TRAINS
Running direct between Chicago, St. Paul
and (Minneapolis, Council Bluffs and
Omah'fi connecting for Pertlard, Denver,
San Francisco and all Pacific Coast Points.
OMJ LINE TO THE BUCK HIUS
For Tickets, Rates,
Map*
Time Tables and fntt
Information, apMy to en, Ticket Agent or ad*
dro»» ate Gen'l Passenger Agent,
Chicago, III.
OTTiuH, B.o. man, e. p. wiwo*,
OnuUftutsr. SnbUuittt.
Sixteen Trans-Oontinental Pas
senger Trains Daily.
lilide^tliKhew train schedule which the Nor
therii.IVictlic Kuilroad inaugurated June 15, l*!io
there will lie sixteen transcontinental passen
ger traias moving daily on this great liue, eight
east boindand eluht. west bound, exclusive of
108 loeafi niaiu ana
rtinnini
Duiuth ...
Moiitpim, Idaho, Oregon and Washington on
its 3800ftiiles of track.
108
loenfi niaiu and bram-li line passenger trains
iiinintfidaUy west of St. Paul, Ashland and
uluthju Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota
Olias.fS. Fee. General Passenger Agent of
theliuiMitSt. Paul, announces that under the
new arrangement the iirst through train, the
Pacific Express, leaves St. Paul at 8:15 A. M.,
Dally, ^Itli a througti Pullman Pallace Sleep
iugCorfleavlnj Chicago dail.vat5:30p.m., via
the. Chrago Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway
rnuniqa'vla Helena and Tacoma direct to Port
land, aid making close connections at St. Paul
with alfltrains leaving St. Louis in the forenoon
aiid-Ohifogoiuthe afternoon of the previous
day. arriving at Tacoma I0:r0 a. m. of the
third d&y md Portland the same afternoon.
The
Mall,
ClpSC
icond through train, No. l, the Pacific
Ives 8t. Paul at4:15 p. m, daily, making
anections with the "Fast Mail" and all
Chicago, will carry a through
")liig Car and one or more
Jng Cars leaving Chicago
night ttains out of Chicago
Pullm^R Pallace Sleeping
Pullmaa Tourist Sleelng
at 10*
line, ri
andTa
carry. Vnllinan Tourist Sleeping Cars, but free
colonist sleepers wilt be run only on train No.
5 St. Paul at 4:15 p. in.
orthem Pacific now operates the is
imentof dining cars of any railroad in
d, twenty-four, and also the longest
m. daily by the Wisconsiu Central
mning through to Portlaud via Helena
soma. Both trains out of St. l'anl will
the
Pullm
line running these sleepers to the principal
md pleasure resorts in Northern
la. NorthItakota, Manitoba, Montana
Sleeping Car line in existance. namely:
to Portland via Tacoma, is the only
trade centers and pleasure resorts in
MinnejjT
and Washington.
betweei
enablesthfr company to announce a through
Pullman Sleeping Car service between St. Paul
andTaeptna and Portland via Butte, west on
m. train, east
the 4:l(ip. m. train, east from Portland on the
7:00
Atlantic Mall.
WDoi!WORK-®®(sf
AffAettMEtHS
N(W t-C'ME $[WIN& MACHINE ORANGE MASS.
5S.B0. 28 UNION SQUARE,NY. jAtJfitjjSjrr.
CHlCS-Uk.
N=y»TLIVMTA.SA=CAt'
SElT- 5 1890.
6:23-
p.i».
m.
Wooilfgocket—Passenger North at*5:02 pm.
v. Passenger 8outhati0:40am.
Passenger East at 10:40. am.
,. Freight North at 10:40 am.
SitM Freight South at 5:02pm.
Freight East at 2:15
a m.
Southern Minnesota
Passenger arrives at
12:48
Freight arrives at 4:40 in
all prl.s
inneseta,
r.^i?r' tables,rates of passage a&i
apply to the nearest station agent
in-theWorld.
R.
miner,
a
V.H. Carpenter.
GenerjU Manager. Gen'l Pass and Tkt. Ag
Chicago, Illinois.
W Fir information in reference
to lands and
towns owned oy the Chicago, Milwaukeea
j.PAULjltailw aj Company, write to H.G
HAuoAff.Land Commissioner. Milwaukee, Wta
eonsin
CHICAGO*"
SSISC°
ST.LOUIS.MD. mumyp OALLAS.TEX.
ROTKBROSat Wessington Springs
Subscribe for the
herald.
ALBERT & VESSEY,
tte®
md
Under The 8un^
That may ho
every-day articles
true' use
jyjow but little. '--"'u."''ff*
"XZTZl
have it itoP«te4 "f',
mad0
that torrid clime.
Cof&e from ^ra^a»
xnusenm of wonders it
the countries repreaen
ot workmen employ«d
comforts and luxuries to
r.d»eu,
6
Just a
grades, Bake»,
WWW»" Aberdeen flour.
all prices.
4
THROUGH SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS
The Wessington Springs Herali
The Northwestern Agrienlturis
BOTH FOR ONE TEAR, and
A DUE BILL FOR ONE DOLLAR'S WORTH of FLO WE
VEGETABLES, GRAIN or GRASS SEEDS, Bulbs or Plants,
be selected from the JOHN A. SALZER SEED CO.'S Fall
Catalogne for 1890, or General Catalogue for 1891.
ALL FOR to IA ii SEPERATELY *4 CA
ONLY THEY COST ?3.50.
t^This is one of the greatest combination offers ever made by reliable
publishers, and to many, may Heem impossible but the fact that it is
offered by us. together with the publishers of The Northwestern Agricul
turist and the John Salzer Seed Co., of LaCrosse, Wis., the most extensive
growers and dealers in seeds, etc., in the West, is sufficient to guarantee its
fulfillment,
Sample copies ot Tiie Northwestkrx Agriculturist sent on
application to publishers, 654 Temple Court, Minneapolis.
For Salzer's Fall Catalogue, 1890. (now ready) write John A.
Salzer Seed Co., LaCrosse, Wis.
-HERALD and Agricoltnrtst witbOQt Seeds, only $1.75.-
LoElla FI. Blank, Associate.
08Peaally
Taplooa puddmg'f Wo
a
NO. 889
80mr
of which
nvt-inlps common use ....
hi (1
™. -0',
plant
from the root ot
to
and
Tea From
China,
fact our
ft* i\ /$
5 S
Store «b
stop
to think of
ya8t
number
to brin?
these
door8.
Come
of Generai
W. ha« WW dotUing
BMtard to Flour.
«ord "®^t
in
the
Woonsocket ioir. toit "Snow
1,1
m4
ALBERT & VESSEY.
"s si
1
E. Caldwell,
First door east of the Hardware
Store, Main street, Wessington
Springs, keeps a first class Meat Mar
ket. He will pay the I
HICHE8T MARK1T PRICK
POULTRY*, MUTTON, VEAL, BEEF, and PORK,
Farmers and others are invited to call when they are ia
need of meat, or having live stock to sell. Caldwell.
for
HIDES
He keeps constantly on hand
$
•s
13
Pi
I
JK SI
»«. S.t
t'5
1
*5"
f,»
5
W
Ml-
I1H
fii
I 4
Ml

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